My stupid question of the day

That is not taught in EE school - and it should have been obvious. That is learned from safety codes. Safety codes are like a programming language - you are expected to learn it on your own. EE school is too busy teaching things quite more advanced and far more important. Like a Doctor right out of med school, then the EE learns these other things like an intern learns how to suture. They don't teach suturing in med school and they don't teach electrical safety in engineering school. Both are expected to be learned out here - as Zerex71 is doing. Amazing how many responders don't even understand that - instead jump to criticize.
Reply to
w_tom
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This is and electrical discussion and being picky about some simple english aberation only proves you have not got enough knowledge to argue against my criticism of your abysmal knowledge of electricity when you claim to be an Electrical Engineer.
-- John G.
Reply to
John G
Hi Bill,
Okay, terminology time - what is meant again by "balanced" as opposed to "unbalanced"? Is it anything like "matched/unmatched"? What does it mean to match or balance a load to a power supply? Are we talking impedance of the load?
Reply to
Zerex71
EXACTLY.
I, thank you very much, got my EE degree but there are many many things that are not even covered during that schooling, on the theory that, like you have said, you pick up later on in the game. For example, just because EE's have that degree, does not necessarily mean that they know everything about it, of course (and thank you for coming to my defense). For example, I still have questions about lots of things, including television and radio. The principles were taught, but like in all of engineering, each problem and situation requires you to understand *that particular problem*. This particular question came to me one day because I said, "You know, I'm not sure anyone ever told me that." Obviously I know three prongs are for safety, and obviously I know that polarized two-prong plugs are for safety reasons as well. But I also know that I have both kinds of plugs plugged into the same outlet at work, coming from the building power, which is most likely a single phase of a three-phase power line/ transmission.
And anyway, I feel no shame in asking these questions because I am not ashamed to acknowledge when I don't know something. I have found that this is a minority viewpoint, because most people will cover up their ignorance by bluster, meanness, or prideful ignorance.
Mike
Reply to
Zerex71
The other thing is, I've been doing software engineering for sixteen years. Have I ever once had to know these things? No. Do I want to be able to explain the basics for all of the study I've done? You bet. I'd feel pretty stupid if I couldn't answer...my stupid questions.
Also, I'm glad I went the EE route first, because most people probably could not go the 'vocational/trade school' route and then get into EE, but having gone through EE, the reverse direction should be a snap should I decide to pursue the more 'practical' side of EE.
As my power systems professor once quipped, "When you stick your finger in an electrical outlet, it's not the imaginary part you feel." :)
Mike
Reply to
Zerex71
And in all this time that you have spent trying to admonish me, you have yet to answer my question. So your answer to me should just simply be, "I don't know." That'll suffice, thanks.
Reply to
Zerex71

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