Oregon Power Poles

Here in Oregon, when conductors are brought from the top of the pole to an underground cable at the bottom of the pole, the PVC enclosure
of the conductors is mounted on standoffs of what looks like 4 - 8 inches so that the PVC (or whatever material is used) is not actually touching the pole except for the supports. I have seen this done for high voltage distribution (34.6 kV) but also for household service entrances (240/120 V) voltage levels.
I'm curious to know why the standoff from the pole, I haven't seen this in other states. Anybody know for sure?
It seems obvious that this is to protect the wooden pole some way, but from what? Because of the cooler climate, Oregon has comparitively less lighting than most other states. Many transmission circuits are run without grounded static wires because of this. Does the standoff make it easier to replace a damaged pole? Is it somehow a safer installation?
Beachcomber
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| Here in Oregon, when conductors are brought from the top of the pole | to an underground cable at the bottom of the pole, the PVC enclosure | of the conductors is mounted on standoffs of what looks like 4 - 8 | inches so that the PVC (or whatever material is used) is not actually | touching the pole except for the supports. I have seen this done for | high voltage distribution (34.6 kV) but also for household service | entrances (240/120 V) voltage levels. | | I'm curious to know why the standoff from the pole, I haven't seen | this in other states. Anybody know for sure? | | It seems obvious that this is to protect the wooden pole some way, but | from what? Because of the cooler climate, Oregon has comparitively | less lighting than most other states. Many transmission circuits are | run without grounded static wires because of this. Does the standoff | make it easier to replace a damaged pole? Is it somehow a safer | installation?
Maybe they will know over in misc.industry.utilities.electric.
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Beachcomber wrote:

Conduit risers are mounded on standoffs to provide space for climbing the pole.
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Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
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been quite a few years sence i have seen anyone climb a power pole... up up and awayyyyy in the bucket lift.
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Tim Perry wrote:

This is true. But there's still the occasional time that its easier to climb.
A few months ago, I saw a line crew setting up to change a bad transformer on a single phase lateral that had been rendered inaccessible to standard bucket trucks due to construction. You could walk in to the pole, but couldn't drive between a new building and a creek. At 8 AM, they were setting up with a full line crew, a crane with about 150 feet of reach and a bucket truck of similar dimensions. At about 3 PM, they were still there.
I can remember the good old days, when a crew would tackle this kind of job in a couple of hours by wheeling the transformer in/out with a hand truck and rigging a block and tackle to a portable hoisting arm (I forget what they called these things) and climbing. Figuring the difference in cost between the former specialized equipment (that crane alone probably rents for a few thousand $ a day with its own crew) and maybe a couple of extra grunts on the ground for the latter, machinery isn't always the cheapest way to get things done.
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i have dealt with power companies in several of these united states. i have found the service crews, without exception, to be highly trained in safety procedures, professional acting, competent, suficiently equiped to handle the task at hand.
not too long ago i had a reason to get a quote on a 100' crane rental. if i recall correctly it was about $100/hr with a minimum delivery & operator charge or $750/day.
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Tim Perry wrote:

That's still pretty expensive compared to doing it by hand. I don't think there are any safety issues involved. At least not 20 years ago when our crews did a few of them this way.
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