Structured wiring: fiber optic or not?

I have a 37" glass tube Sony that works fine for Wii games.
Try to stay on topic and avoid your posting style ignorance. It's a
way-too-obvious troll indicator and gets you into so many kill-filters very quickly. Perhaps look into a proper newsreader that can use more up-to-date posting styles. Forte Agent 4.1 seems to be pretty antiquated when not used for binary software piracy. Perhaps you haven't set it up correctly and it is still attempting to sort out the confusion with right caret characters on attachment reference text.
You may notice how most readers thread the posts and the previous text can be referenced by going back a line? Many site online can teach you this by googling "beginning Usenet posting"
Hope this helps.
I have the last huge TV (one of them) the Toshiba HD SD combo set at 37".
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Most of the ones I refer to have CPU's. Even fairly simple tasks use a CPU these days. My thermostats have about 500 settings each alone, plus the central mixer control they talk to via comm bus...LOL
House control logic system, alternative energy system control and monitoring and it's slave CPU that control's the grid co-gen power system. Media player PC system, even my TV has a CPU with firmware I upgrade, CPU sewing machines and control CPU for them. Not to mention the CPU based SCADA systems I run for analogue monitoring and control of functions in my workshop shed, from the house (1200 baud 4W modem...LOL). The list goes on and on these days.
100 SVGA CRT monitors?... Yuk. That's alot of energy and space.
I was just discussing, with the wife, tonight how movies are so dated, now by the CRT monitors used. What was high-tech, not ten years ago looks silly in the cops and sci-fi shows. Meanwhile they are so careful not to mention dates in most movies...LOL My, how fast things change.

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Josepi wrote:

I test them and give them away. I am retirement age, but now 100% disabled so it's a hobby. I keep equipment out of a landfill, and help people with used computer parts.

I still prefer a CRT type monitor. They cause me less eye strain. I'm using a 17" emachines CRT monitor right now. I really miss my 22" HP CRT monitor. It had 1536 * 2048 resolution.
I was a broadcast engineer, and never liked CCD cameras or LCD monitors for studio use.
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I love that about old sci-fi movies. It's fun to see what was considered futuristic at the time. Of course if a technology hasn't been thought of yet, it's pretty hard to accurately portray it in a movie!
It's amazing how fast things progress. If someone 10 years ago had told me that by now you'd be able to buy a 2 Terabyte 3.5" hard drive for ~$100 I'd have thought they were on drugs. The first hard drive I bought was 340MB and cost around $400, and that seemed like a bargain at the time.
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James Sweet wrote:

And software that cost $30 now costs $100+! Producing millions of complicated hardware reduces its price, but the price of software which costs pennies to reproduce stays high.
When will people wise up and switch to open source?
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It cost pennies to *reproduce* but how much do you think it costs to produce? It doesn't write itself!
I use open source for a lot of things, but in many cases the functionality I need or the quality is not there. I'm not a developer, I don't wish to fix my own code. $100, or even $1000 is peanuts compared to the time I can spend chasing down dependencies or scouring forums for a solution instead of just referring to a nicely written manual or calling up tech support.
I'm not intending to bash open source, but to use it or not is not a case of whether one is "wise".
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The first external hard drive we bought at my previous place of employment, about 25 years ago was a full height 5 1/4 inch one in an external rack type case, which had space to add a second drive, and also contained the power supply, and a SASI controller. It was 16 MB formatted, and cost over three thousand pounds. We thought that we'd never manage to fill that much space! The heads didn't park automatically, and you couldn't do it from software; you had to remove the top of the case, and turn a small wheel on the side of the drive before powering it down.
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I remember getting my first large memory board that was capable of 64K of static RAM populated to 16K for just under $1000. I had to write my own drivers for the floppy disk interface and beat the market technology using a double sided 5.25" drive with 40 tracks instead of the usual 35 tracks. This took it past the 100K of storage.
But those were still the advanced days from the Motorola MEK6800D2 kits. 1K of RAM memory was a huge upgrade and was almost a dream. I had to do a lot of foil scratching and air mounting to get those four chips wired in. Two note music was a big fascination and a few of us defined standards to store musical notes in so they could be shared with others using 1802 RCA processors. PCs (Intel) were never heard of and IBM didn't make micro PCs period. They were only toys until they put their name on them.
I love that about old sci-fi movies. It's fun to see what was considered futuristic at the time. Of course if a technology hasn't been thought of yet, it's pretty hard to accurately portray it in a movie!
It's amazing how fast things progress. If someone 10 years ago had told me that by now you'd be able to buy a 2 Terabyte 3.5" hard drive for ~$100 I'd have thought they were on drugs. The first hard drive I bought was 340MB and cost around $400, and that seemed like a bargain at the time.

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A few do, mainly those who do development work at home, though the need for this has been reduced by virtual hardware. I know two people who have multiple servers at home. I can see no reason why anybody would need fibre at home, other than possibly for testing or training purposes.
I was replying to James's suggestion that fibre is no longer installed for purely internal connections within buildings, other than in special circumstances; it certainly is, at least in larger buildings.
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I learned early in my fibre job career that fibre optics are only required where copper limits the length of cable due to bandwidth usage.
OTOH: I have learned in electrical high tension stations it can eliminate some of the ground gradient problems with copper commuication buses during high current electrical fault conditions.
wrote:

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All glass fibre optics need a large radius for the bends. 1/4" radius will definitely break any of the corning glass products we used to build a four city wide MAN fibre optic network.
I was warned of this bend problem early in my installation training and thought it was bunk. I was using electrical tape boxes (about 4.5" dia.) to store spare flexible jumper leads for usage in the field instead of making two trips from the site to warehouse each time. It took a few months to a few years for the fractures to show up in the glass and become problems for customers once they achieve high bandwidths and cannot attain them, due to data errors...fractured glass strands = reflected light and bad light conduction.
One day a contract cross country fibre optic company we used to do all our splices, showed me, with his laser light indicator, what happens when you bend the stuff too sharply. Red light spills out the sides at the fractures and you can see it right throuygh the jackets too. Most strands never recover but still work fine, depending on tolerable light losses. We stopped storing the flex jumpers in small round boxes from then on. Behind the scenes I began seeing all our installed jumpers being replaced due to data errors (light impedance)....ooops!
Check the specs and although these jacketed outdoor cables with many strands looks tough they cannot make the sharp bends. Most specs will tell you to use no smaller than 2-3" conduit to enforce slow turns.
Shock? A few incidents where cables between poles were hit, one by a dumptruck, and a pole hit in an accident (IIRC), shattered some (or all) of the strands in 50 or 100 strand aerial cables. The contractors started cutting back cable sheaths to find the start of the good glass sections and make a splice there. One fracture from the dumptruck with dumper up, stretched the cable so badly before snapping, the inside the fractured strands when over 1 km in one direction and almost 1/2 km the other, due to longitudinal mechanical shock. The injuries are restrung back to the nearest splice box now, without test, and it it takes a few km of new cable it is faster and cheaper. The drivers not looking pay big time for those ones.
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When we did our building, we put runs of rectangular plastic downspout pipe into the walls and floors.
John
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Yes - always do 2 (or more) of each so you can do loopback tests.
Put in some lines in the attic and to the roof for satellite, antenna on the roof, and antenna in the attic.
Cat 6E might be for real now, so try for it instead of Cat 6. The cables I put in in 2004 say "CAT6E", but it certainly wasn't an official specification then.
See if you can find out what the cable company runs to your house. It would either be better than RG-6 or better than RG-6 that you choose at random. Also, get the kind that has a separate wire for DC.
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Single mode. The stuff I put in 2004 works with the 1Gb/s interfaces that I got 6 years ago that were made for the larger diameter multimode stuff [wouldn't work over kilometers, does work over 100 meters] Single mode interfaces are still till expensive, but coming down in price. Multi-mode won't handle much over 1Gb/s; single mode should hit more than 1Tb/s over 100 meters in a while.
There probably is a specific type of connector that you should use for the fiber-optics, but I never figured out what it was.

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Do you mean Cat. 6A? I've never heard of 6E.
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I think OM-1 is 220m with Gigait, 1000 base SX. OM-3 laser optimised fibre will do 10 Gb, 10G base SR, at several hundred metres, I think it's 300 m.
The longer wavelength optics normally used with single mode fibre are significantly more expensive. It is possible to run 1000 base LX over OM-1 and OM-2 multimode fiber using special mode conditioning patch cords, but you'd probably only do this if you already had existing older fibre installed.
As for connectors, ST were the most common at one time, but later equipment tended to be SC. In more recent times the smaller LC connector has become very common, and is probably the most popular. It is also the recommend standard for use with OM-3 fibre. We've found all of these connector types to be reliable, and MTRJ to be very unreliable.
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In sci.electronics.equipment snipped-for-privacy@mail.croydon.ac.uk wrote:

none of this matters.
nobody is going to be hooking up fiber devices in their home, no matter what's in the walls already.
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On Wed, 4 Aug 2010 19:54:07 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader

You're an idiot.

I have a former boss that lives in WV now, and he re-built his entire home from the ground up, and installed fiber, coax, Cat6, etc. into his home. He does use it.
Your "mo matter what" remark proves that you do not know what the fuck you are talking about, boy.
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Recommend any system that allows easy upgrades, such as conduit with pull cords installed. Then he can pull through whatever the current cool stuff he wants.
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Save time and money. Run both single and multi mode fibers but perform no terminations.
Then, use as needed as the future technology dictates. The savings is in the time it would take to fish lines in the future. Doing it now, while those tasks are what you are doing anyway, will save a lot of time, and you'll thank yourself in the future for not having to do it then.
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I have a couple of BlackBox 100Mbit media converters for FIbre to Ethernet and back I can sell to somebody. They wholesale for about $1000 each. I am sure they would have come down a bit by now. They support all the handshake check signals too.
For 100Mbit or even 1000Mbit why bother, unless you want to talk over a couple of km? Run copper inside. The fibre optic providers do.
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