Structured wiring: fiber optic or not?

A friend is having a new roof put on his his 50-year-old, flat-roof home. This provides access to all kinds of new wiring possibilities for the
structure.
He wants to do 2xCAT6 and 2xRG-6 throughout. I'm not sure what to recommend re. fiber optic.
Is it too soon to know how this will be an advantage to existing homes?
I hear there are several FO standards (62.5 micron, 50 micron). Is there strong competition, or is one the clear favorite into the future?
What should I recommend?
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How about some big conduit and some fish lines, so anything can be added later?
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hadn't thought of that. It's a great idea.
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob E. wrote:

Second that. Fiber has been around for decades and never really caught on for internal communications. It's great for moving lots of data over really long distance, but within a building there is just not much advantage over copper and a lot of disadvantages.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fibre needs it's own conduit. It is still fragile, limited bend radius and subject to shock. Secondly, it will be corning glass so thin that it bends. Plastic fibres have too much opacity, went out with hooped skirts and is limited to toys and lamps now.
If you damage it you may not realize it until you wonder why the bandwidth is so bad. Stick with copper inside a buiding as James stated.. The fibre optic providers do. Glass fibre has never been faster than the copper circuits that feed it.
Second that. Fiber has been around for decades and never really caught on for internal communications. It's great for moving lots of data over really long distance, but within a building there is just not much advantage over copper and a lot of disadvantages.
Bob E. wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Jacketed fiber is tough. One trick is to blow it into existing underground gas pipes, with a little parachute/umbrella sort of thing. A quarter inch bend radius has no effect on the stuff we use.
But shock?
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 03 Aug 2010 13:45:58 -0700, John Larkin

More Larkin non-sense.
1/4" bend radius is not true.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The_Giant_Rat_of_Sumatra wrote:

It depends on the fiber. I have a fiber patch cable that came from some networking gear at work that got removed. It has a yellow jacket and appears at first glance very much like 18 gauge zip cord only a little thinner. You can tie it in a knot without breaking the fiber, although in practice I wouldn't recommend it.
This is pretty much just academic at this point though, nobody installs fiber from point to point within a building anymore. Copper is easier, more versatile, and cheaper; both the medium itself and the equipment at the ends. The only time it makes sense to use fiber is when you absolutely need electrical isolation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ALl fibre optic strand are made from Corning glass and will not bend that sharply. As somebody that has destroyed hundreds of those yellow jumpers (I didn't believe it either) that you can tie in knots, I know they are ruined inside after that.
Find somebody with a red laser LED jumper tester or OTDR tester and you will see what I mean. The light does not make those corners and spills out the sides of the jacket. After you straighten it out the light still spills out the sides of the jacket if you have created minute fractures, the glass is broken inside now.
Read the specs. I forget the rule of thumb but the minimum radius is abut 15 times the diameter of the cable, typically. Glass does not bend, or stretch, that far without damage.
It depends on the fiber. I have a fiber patch cable that came from some networking gear at work that got removed. It has a yellow jacket and appears at first glance very much like 18 gauge zip cord only a little thinner. You can tie it in a knot without breaking the fiber, although in practice I wouldn't recommend it.
This is pretty much just academic at this point though, nobody installs fiber from point to point within a building anymore. Copper is easier, more versatile, and cheaper; both the medium itself and the equipment at the ends. The only time it makes sense to use fiber is when you absolutely need electrical isolation.
The_Giant_Rat_of_Sumatra wrote: More Larkin non-sense.
1/4" bend radius is not true.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

His declaration is below that of any fiber I have ever seen.

You are not very bright. Nearly ALL government facilities utilize it. It does not radiate. It is used widely by the military as well. And yes, I do refer to structural installations.

I am quite sure that you have failed to cover all of the decision making points surrounding a comm link medium choice.

There are more reasons, but you seem to enjoy simplification.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It depends on the type of building, but most of the installations I see are mainly fibre within the building.
Our network here is fairly typical; from the main core switch we have copper to the servers in the same room, and 16 core multimode fibre, mainly OM-3 laser optimised now, out to the various comms rooms around the building; there is one of these at each end of each floor, blus a couple of additional ones, and a few more are being added. From the edge switches in these rooms it's copper out to the desktops, and to a few attional servers, telephone system etc. We've also got fibre through the underground car park to another building; this is OM-1 fibre, and just within distance for it. From that building we have copper out to some temporary 'hut' type buildings in what used to be its car park.
To another building just across a road from the main one where we rent some office space we have two 100 Mb laser links on the roof. Until recently we had a wireless bridge feeding one PC in a 'shed' on a roof. We also have a 1Gb fibre link to another site, about 2-3 km away which we are using for about 3 years during major refurbishment of our main building, but this link is not ours; it;s a service which we buy from BT. Obviously this link is single mode fibre, but it terminates on a NTE box at each end, into which we plug our own multi mode fibre. BT monitor this line via an ISDN connection at one end. A similar fibre link, but at 100 Mb provides our Internet connection; in this case the user's connection on the NTE box is copper. Within the building on the end of the 1 Gb link is all copper, because we are using the existing, terrible, cabling that was in that building; for the short time involved it wasn't worth having the whole building re- cabled, but many of the lines are over-length for copper, most of the socket modules on the ends are poor quality, and there is only one strand of Cat. 5 run to most of the cabinet positions around the building. I we were going to use this building for longer it would have been re-cabled with fibre.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What I wrote there wasn't very clear. When I wrote that there are comms rooms at each end of the building I didn't mean actually *at* the ends, but rather in the East and West parts of the building. our building is long, and a strange shape. It's not always possible to take cables by a very direct route, e.g. where you need to go up or down through the building have to get them to a service riser where you can run them. Many of our fibre runs within the main building are over 100 m, and some over twice that. Some of them also run through electrically noisy areas with heavy machinery. Other than when used with MTRJ connectors, we've found fibre to be very reliable, more so than copper. I wouldn't run it to the desktop though, as some propose.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I doubt a householder will ever need to connect multiple servers via anything to his multitude of PCs around the building.
What I wrote there wasn't very clear. When I wrote that there are comms rooms at each end of the building I didn't mean actually *at* the ends, but rather in the East and West parts of the building. our building is long, and a strange shape. It's not always possible to take cables by a very direct route, e.g. where you need to go up or down through the building have to get them to a service riser where you can run them. Many of our fibre runs within the main building are over 100 m, and some over twice that. Some of them also run through electrically noisy areas with heavy machinery. Other than when used with MTRJ connectors, we've found fibre to be very reliable, more so than copper. I wouldn't run it to the desktop though, as some propose.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Josepi wrote:

You must have less than 100 PCs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A few less than 100. If you counted CPUs I might be close.
Cripes even my thermostats talk on a RS485 bus but not Ethernet so no router yet...LOL
You must have less than 100 PCs.
Josepi wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Josepi wrote:

I'm not talking about spare parts or PIC chips. I'm talking about desktops, laptops, and multimedia computers.
Can you use 100 SVGA CRT monitors? I could give you that many.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 05 Aug 2010 14:58:03 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

You were the idiot that was dumb enough to collect them.
You call me a troll, yet you converse with a top posting dolt that ignores folks telling him to learn how to post to Usenet properly.
Yeah, Mich, yer a real Usenet guru... not.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FigureItOut wrote:

I wouldn't be surprised in the least if they become valuable collectibles at some point, they're getting scrapped so quickly that sooner or later they'll become rare. I'd have laughed if someone told me that a few years ago but things are changing. Something common as dirt is worthless and most of them get thrown away, then down the road people who remember them get nostalgic and by that point most of them are gone.
I've seen several 486 PC systems fetch $250-$350 on ebay recently, actual sales, not just sky high opening bids. I threw out several a number of years ago when they were less than worthless and apparently so did everyone else. An original PC/XT or AT with a matching monitor will get at least a hundred bucks, often more. Apple II systems that I saw go for a few dollars a pallet load at school auctions will now bring hundreds each in working condition.
I would personally pay up to $100 for a decent condition IBM 5154 EGA monitor for my own collection, but they don't come up often and when they do they normally fetch upwards of $200.
The same thing happened with tube audio gear. That stuff was getting pitched left and right in the 60s and 70s, now virtually tube audio gear is worth something, with certain items fetching small fortunes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Only certain models.
Like, I have a Ball monochrome Hercules vector graphic display that is still in the box. That would be worth something.
Or like the top of the line Viewsonic fine line, high bandwidth display that only the Mac nuts can claim to top.
I have both. I also have a 10MB Tandon original HD. That will only be worth something a few minutes after I die.

Bullshit. Not without some defining feature. Like the Sony tube flat screen era. It also has to be max 0.25 dot pitch. Any bigger and they are a dime a dozen.

I have the last huge TV (one of them) the Toshiba HD SD combo set at 37".
That isn't the biggest, but that is one huge scan area.

I should spec my old machines out and put them up. I even have an old EISA 486 DX screamer.

I didn't. I think I still have my first machine (PC). I wish I still had my first computer (a pair of Atari 800s).

My friend's PC XT had no HD, nor did it have a detachable display. It was integrated into the base/computer chassis. Itwas an IBM product.

Yeah. I saw some mainframe stuff that gets sold for scrap weight prices. There were some NICE air handling systems in those things, dangit.

Sad too. A used thumb mouse from Logitech goes for $45, and the damned things are always on their last legs (the switches go out).
None of the new models are done right. They should bring back the old design as a gaming mouse, which is why the old one is so popular.

Yes, but they are hugely overpriced, and over hyped as being 'better' when they are not. That fad will pass too.
Those old baby finger sized tubes would be cool to see again though... :-) Don;t know if you are familiar with those.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.