Where do you source 35 Amp 220VAC circuit breakers that are NOT in typical box stores?

On 12/17/19 11:41 PM, snipped-for-privacy@decadence.org wrote:


Although, technically, that was Flavoraid.
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"I am a river to my people."
Jeff-1.0
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Yeah, except the way you used it was the "Drinking the Kool-Aid" expression, even, as its roots have always been the stuff Jones handed out, despite the misnomer it got for decades. As if he drank it and survived, with degraded nueral effects. That didn't happen when he became a republican. I know many whom are OK. It happened when the idiot embraced the NYC criminal Doanld J. Trump. THAT was his tainted Kool-Aid. Him and 63 million other idiots. NONE of them did their due dilligence on the stupid bastard.
And the last nit would be that it is "Kool-Aid", unless, I suppose you were referencing the above mentioned expression, then phonetic is good enough.
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On 12/17/19 1:46 PM, Fox's Mercantile wrote:

Do some research. Total up the cost of all federal, state and county welfare programs and then ask yourself where the welfare money comes from.
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On 12/18/19 5:39 AM, devnull wrote:

An accurate division of Federal Spending. <https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/Rv5UHrNsvcucvflDwwz_pqEjjHnbQeE_HoAgEM44mGOwutlLCyMopUBTlKW_j1krJ775qI5DGZLYlEB8z7I3mD5BllP27Iq4URRWPE-vV3hfqv4wYgLtmDm3D_Z_hAlEMc-s1yA
--
"I am a river to my people."
Jeff-1.0
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The "40 years" you "funded Medicare" did not even pay for you, idiot.
So that money is long gone. Nothing for a retarded putz like you to claim is getting spent elsewhere.
So I guess that makes you "LamahFuckUS". Because you seem to think that ANY of what you paid in is even still there.
Yep... Yer a DEVice, with a NUL difference. Ya got that one right.
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On 12/18/19 12:35 AM, snipped-for-privacy@decadence.org wrote:

Invest 2.9% of your paycheck into a decent S&P index fund and see how much you got at the end of 40 years. Anyone with a real job will have a pile of cash big enough to fund a private health insurance policy on just the interest alone and they'll likely have a pile of cash to leave their kids too.
A government run by democrats is *never* a good deal for a working taxpayer.
https://www.marketwatch.com/investing/index/spx
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You are nuttier than a fruitcake, and that even includes the fruitcake some bunch of retards put into our nation's highest office.
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On Wed, 30 Oct 2019 04:47:15 -0000 (UTC), Arlen _G_ Holder wrote:

UPDATE: o SUGGESTION: SAVE THIS POST (IT CONTAINS VALUABLE SOURCES!)
This thread contains a TESTED WORKING PROCESS for hard-to-find parts o At the best price & stock possible, in quantities of 1, for homeowners
Being a good Usenet citizen, not only do I put energy into providing tons of detail within the thread, but I always try to summarize the solution, so that others coming here, in the foreseeable future, benefit from our efforts), where this summary will reside in the permanent web-searchable archives:
This summary will reside in these permanent web-searchable archives: o <http://tinyurl.com/alt-home-repair o <http://tinyurl.com/sci-electronics-repair o <http://tinyurl.com/alt-engineering-electrical
And in these permanent web searchable Usenet archives: o <http://alt.home.repair.narkive.com o <http://sci.electronics.repair.narkive.com o <http://alt.engineering.electrical.narkive.com
The goal was to source "things like" the following part: <
https://i.postimg.cc/ryNkQQvY/breaker03.jpg
o #5, Generac Part Number #74969, 35 Amp Circuit Breaker <
https://i.postimg.cc/qq326cBh/Generac-Control-Panel-9067-9-16345-Page-19.jpg

Home box stores were an instant fail, where those of you in the know would have known that before I even attempted Lowes, Ace, Home Depot, etc.
Also, the local electrical supply shops (roughly about dozen I called in the Silicon Valley), were (rather shockingly) completely clueless how to obtain the part in stock (that was, perhaps, my biggest shock). o AlexanderElec: 831-457-3911 (left message) o BayPower: 408-998-2980 (they don't stock, and can't order) o CupertinoElec: 408-808-8000 (don't deal with individuals) o Eckerman: 831-252-0987 (doesn't have any resource I don't have) o EdgesElec: 408-293-5818 (don't stock, don't order) o NicoElec: 408-446-4141 (left message) o Pfeiffer: 408-436-8523 (they don't do residential) o SprigElec: 408-298-3134 (transferred to sales, left message)
Generac doesn't normally recommend suppliers, but after three calls, I found one second-level tech who privately suggested these suppliers: o <http://onlinecomponents.com $ 92.45 (stock situation unknown) o <http://jackssmallengines.com $137.07 (stock situation unknown) o <http://ordertree.com $233.45> (stock situation unknown)
Searching on the net by Generac part number isn't as useful as searching by the original part number, which, luckily, was still (barely) visible: <
https://i.postimg.cc/vmTTdpdB/breaker02.jpg

AA2-B0-24-635-5D1-C 1. A -> Series A, 277VAC, 80VDC, 10,000 cycles 2. A -> one handle per pole 3. 2 -> two poles 4. B -> series trip current 5. 0 -> w/o aux 6. 24 -> medium delay (04), 50/60Hz 7. 635 -> 35 amp, trip at 43 amp 8. 5 -> bolt-on rear connections 10-32 bolts (very important) 9. D -> labeling is ON/OFF in white, everything else black 10. 1 -> 6-32 x 0.195 inches 11. C -> UL approved, CSA certified
o Amazon <(Amazon.com product link shortened)> o FusesUnlimited <https://www.fusesunlimited.com/circuit-protection-detail/carling/aa2-b0-24-635-5d1-c o Walmart <https://www.walmart.com/ip/Carling-Technologies-AA2-B0-24-635-5D1-C-Circuit-Breaker/213199082
Carling, themselves part of a huge conglomerate, had a lost of a score or so of local "recommended distributors", again, only a very few of which had the part in stock who would sell in quantities of 1, but at a high price - but it turns out there's a better way (see trick later in this post) to bypass that score of parts distributor phone calls.
Carling AA2-B0-24-635-5D1-C 35-amp circuit breaker o Carling: https://www.carlingtech.com/findarep?location $3 o Bridge: 408-335-6700 (you need to pick a person & leave a msg) o Avnet: 408-435-3500 (4-5 weeks lead time, $86.42) o Bates: 408-400-9586 (the number has been disconnected) o Digikey: 800-344-4539 (global sales only, min quantity is 20 parts) o Master: 408-970-8090 (not in stock locally, two weeks, $92.45) o Mouser: 817-804-3888 (not in stock, can send quote) o Newark: 800-463-9275 (not in stock, minimum order is 2) o Sager: 408-544-9500 (not in stock locally, can be ordered, $71.48) o TTI: 510-668-0830 (not in stock, can only order in bulk)
Thanks to the purposefully helpful suggestion by gfretwell, I called Grainger who put me in touch with technical support who told me that they definitely do not carry and cannot purchase the "right" circuit breaker, but that the 40-amp circuit breaker might work in a pinch.
The critical items, of course, are the type of rear connection, which is what's different in the two Grainger alternatives, but which isn't obvious in the Grainger photos because the photos don't show the all important rear of the circuit breaker (spade type tend to vibrate off in generator applications, I'm told, and anyway, it's an unnecessary retrofit).
The 40-amp Carling breaker that Grainger does carry, as gfretwell astutely noted though, is pretty damn close (far better than the SquareD Q0B235, which was also a purposefully helpful suggestion that was posed prior).
<https://www.grainger.com/category/electrical/power-management-circuit-protection-and-distribution/distribution-circuit-breakers-and-temporary-power-solutions/circuit-breakers/panel-mount-circuit-breakers>
Circuit Breaker, Magnetic Circuit Breaker Type, Toggle Switch Type, Number of Poles: 2 Grainger # 10C608 Mfr. Model # BA2-B0-34-640-521-C Catalog Page # 201 UNSPSC # 39121601 <https://www.grainger.com/product/CARLING-TECHNOLOGIES-Circuit-Breaker-10C608>
Circuit Breaker, Magnetic Circuit Breaker Type, Toggle Switch Type, Number of Poles: 2 Grainger # 3XC74 Mfr. Model # CA2-BO-34-640-111-C Catalog Page # 201 UNSPSC # 39121602 <https://www.grainger.com/product/CARLING-TECHNOLOGIES-Circuit-Breaker-3XC74>
I had never called Grainger before (always assuming they're the most expensive), but, at $40 anyway, they are actually the cheapest, by far, but they too didn't have the right part.
In the end, the BEST solution (if we don't go with the alternatives), is this URL which was kindly supplied to be by one of the Carling distributors (who said it's what _he uses_ to source _his_ parts!): <http://eciaauthorized.com
*That's a neat trick!* o *My advice is to _SAVE THAT URL_*!
(That one URL is better than almost everything attempted to date to obtain the part in stock at the best price possible today.)
BTW, Bob Engelhardt, who purposefully helpfully and very kindly suggested the SquareD Q0B235 was on to something when he noted that the original part clearly failed its 10,000 cycle promise, as that breaker couldn't possibly have had more than a few score cycles in its short lifetime, given that it's not a part you generally touch unless you're working on the generator and want to disconnect it from the house (where you're more likely to just pull the 15-amp generator fuse on the front panel to prevent a start): <
https://i.postimg.cc/63Z0x60t/generac-circuit-breaker-panel.jpg

That 15-amp fuse is item #10 in this Generac exploded diagram): <
https://i.postimg.cc/qq326cBh/Generac-Control-Panel-9067-9-16345-Page-19.jpg
<
https://i.postimg.cc/Zqf00Y5K/Generac-Generator-Wiriing-Diagram-9067-9-16345-Page-14.jpg

The part is on order, thanks to purposefully helpful folks on this repair-related group.
--
Usenet is a great resource for homeowners with electrical problems to fix!

The adult audience will appreciate that I never responded to the incessant
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On Sat, 2 Nov 2019 03:40:08 -0000 (UTC), Arlen _G_ Holder

Spade connectors are really pretty robust if you get the heavy duty ones and they are in most motors where vibration is a regular thing. The question is whether that feeder is getting overload 0protection at the panel end? If so the 40 will still be fine to protect the conductors. A 35a breaker for a panel board will be a part you can get if that is not what you have there.
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On 11/1/19 10:40 PM, Arlen _G_ Holder wrote:

No, it contains your usual useless going on and on and on about something most people don't give a fuck about.
--
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Jeff-1.0
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Based upon what Fox's Mercantile said...

Why don't you shut the fuck up!
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On Sun, 27 Oct 2019 21:08:05 -0000 (UTC), Arlen _G_ Holder

That is a fairly normal form factor for industrial equipment and there are a half dozen companies that make breakers that would work for you. I may have one in the garage from IBM. Grainger might be a start locally but it helps there if you know someone with an account. The price is pretty flexible from list to 40% of list depending on how well they know you.
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