Widget for joining 3-core mains flex



That's a safety break, for many reasons. If you drop something like a hedge trimmer, it won't be left dangling around your nuts on the cord looped over your shoulder.
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Andrew Gabriel
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Indeed. Also makes storing the tool easier - or adding an extension. And those extensions with the appliance plug/socket on them often can be bought for less than the cost of the cable from the same store.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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My recently purchased Bosch trimmer, although it had the inconvenient "needs 2 hands" feature (the reason God created gaffer tape) did not have a plug/socket, making it inconvenient to store. I fitted one.
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I don't know if the safety break was a regulatory requirement, although it was pretty universal. Does your Bosch have active breaking (stops dead when you release the handle)? I guess that would do the same thing, although the active breaking on two lawnmowers I have both stopped working after a couple of years, and now the blades just spin down under their own momentum when the trigger is released.
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Andrew Gabriel
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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

That would be active braking.
break =/= brake
Graham
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Eeyore wrote:

Judging from his words, in Andrew's case it does appear that the brake had been actively breaking...
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Sue

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Yes.
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It is the best but sometimes it is too long a job to open up the appliance and to attach the new flex cores because of the way user- unfriendly way in which the appliance has been designed.
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Make the join at the end near to the appliance so it's not dragged around corners all the time.
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Stuart.
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If the flex goes round a indoor doorpost and I pull the flex then I am not putting much strain on it at all.

I will have to live in sin then! :-)

The cable on my fan heater is about 4 to 5 foot and is too short to be used whre I want it to be.
I want it to extend it to about 10 foot.
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Coleman wrote:

Hey, are you related to the Coleman company? :) I just bought a 21 volt cordless drill from Coleman.?
P.S. Can some one tell me what a flex is?
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Jamie wrote:

Coleman is an old AMERICAN company that made gasoline lanterns and camping gear. Good luck with that drill. I was given several new 18 and 19.2 volt Coleman Powermate drills, along with eight batteries. The piece of crap doesn't have enough torque to do much, and one snapped the steel shank that connects the chuck to the gearbox. The other was shipped without a wire from the PWM board, to one side of the trigger. I fixed it, and made one complete set out of the pile of parts. I couldn't even give it away. A $9 drill from Harbor Freight works a WHOLE lot better.

Are you really that dense? It is a British term for flexible line cords. It has been discussed countless times on the electronics and electrical engineering newsgroups.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

well, I'm not British and I have never heard of the term "FLEX".. Here we have different names, maybe not the correct name but different never the less.
SJO, Rubber cord, zip cord, curly cord and yes FLexible cord I can comprehend, but when using the terms "FLEX" with out cord or what ever afterwards kind of throws me. For all I know you could have been talking about "GreenField", BX, BC, Seal Tight, what ever....
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Cabtyre.
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Then a regular extension cord will work fine.
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.

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Yes it will but it s clumsy and inconvenient to get out each time!
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Coleman wrote:

Then stop bodging things and install a proper, permanent socket where it is needed.
Owain
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Bit drastic?
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wrote:

I didn't see the beginning of this thread, but a technique that I frequently use when joining wires is as follows. Look at the diagrams in Courier New font, or they won't make much sense.
-------------- ------------------- Cable +---- wire_1 --------------------+ Cable sheath +----------- wire_2 -------------+ sheath +-------------------- wire_3 ----+ -------------- ---------------------
Firstly, strip a piece of the outer cable sheath off and put it to one side to use later. Then cut the wires as shown in the diagram. Bare the ends of the wires, and solder the two ends of wire_1 together, and the same for the other wires. Because the wires were cut to different lengths in this way, the soldered joints are not close to each other, and cannot short together.
Now take the piece of sheath that you put to one side, slit it down the side, and put it over the new joints. At this point, the cable should look almost as if it had never been worked on.
-------------- ------------------------------------------------- ------------------- Cable | This is the piece of sheath that you | Cable sheath | kept to one side, now used to | sheath | cover the joint | -------------- ------------------------------------------------- ---------------------
Now wind some electrician's tape around the full length of the sheath that you have inserted, and an inch or so beyond each end. Better still would be if you had slipped a piece of heat-shrink tubing over the wire before soldering it together. The heat-shrink tubing should be about two inches longer than the piece of sheathing you used to cover the joints. _________________________________________________________________ ---------/ / / / / / / /----------- / / / Taped up with electrician's tape / / ----/ / / / / / /____ / / / / / / / / ----------/_________________________________________________________________/------------
I have used the same technique on multi-wire cable - most recently on an Ethernet cable that I had to cut to get through a small hole, then join together again, because I didn't have the tool to put the connector back on. In this case, with 8 wires, the total length of the connection was about 4 inches.
MikeC
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MikeC wrote:

----------/_________________________________________________________________/------------
Fine for signal cables.
Lethal for mains flex.
The method provides virtually no strain relief for the conductors. Which a continuous outer sheath provides as well as insulation.
Subject to even a modest pull, the conductors or soldered joints will fail, potentially leading to a bare live conductor.
Any means of jointing mains flex has to provide strain relief for the conductors comparable to that provided by the outer sheath of the original cable.
--
Sue






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