Xenon Lights Tripping GFI on Separate circuit

Hello,
Not sure if this is the correct group to post this. If not, please let me know.
I purchased a xenon under cabinet light to replace the boring
fluorescent one that was there . When I turned it on, a GFI breaker on another circuit in my home is tripped. I exchanged it for a new one, now the GFI breaker occasionally trips. The only thing in common between the circuit the light is on and the circuit the GFI breaker is on is that the wiring comes in close proximity to each other. Is it possible that the xenon lights are inducing a voltage on the input line which is in-turn inducing a voltage on the circuit that is in close proximity causing the GFI to trip? Has anyone seen this?
Thank You,
John
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I have not seen true "Xenon" lamps.
BUT if it is some type of "arc" lamp and the cord includes ground the odds are even that it indirectely uses "ground" to help "strike" the arc.
If it has a grounding plug, you might have to use a non-GFCI outlet.
If it doesn't have a grounding plug check you installation for some accidental ground fault.
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John Gilmer wrote:

They are incandescent with xenon fill. I believe they are more efficient because there is less heat transfer with xenon.
-- bud--
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bud-- wrote:

Basically a halogen lamp. These are incandescent lamps and should not cause problems with GFCI circuits.
A couple of things to check: That the lamps neutral return is wired correctly (not connected to ground by mistake). If these are low voltage halogens, the transformer may be exhibiting excessive leakage to ground.
--
Paul Hovnanian snipped-for-privacy@hovnanian.com
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Yes, that is possible. I have seen noise from one circuit trip a GFCI breaker on another circuit in the same distribution panel. It is due to higher freequency noise getting into the GFCI circuitry itself, not an imbalance of current, which is the normal trip mode. Separate wiring might help, or an RF filter on the light.
Ben Miller
--
Benjamin D. Miller, PE
www.bmillerengineering.com
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