Bolt size for rim cylinder locks

Does anyone know the size of the bolts used to install a standard garage
door rim cylinder lock? There are two bolts and I'm pretty sure the
threads are 24 per inch. I am looking for the correct tap and die and am
not sure of the diameter. I'm pretty sure it is NOT 1/4-24 or 12-24.
Thanks!
Joy
Reply to
Joy
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Here there unfortunately is no true standard. What I would do is to bring the cylinder to the hardware store with you and match it up.
If it does not seem to be any of the standard sizes check in the selection of "stove bolts" These come in some obscure threads.
If I may ask, why are you looking for a tap and die? Ordinarily the lock cylinder is already tapped, and the screws come with the new cylinder.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf
I do have a tap and die set - two in fact... English and metric. I cannot find a match other than to use the thread gauge to measure 24 tpi.
You are correct that many rim cylinders use the same bolt size.
I'm not being rude, but please don't bother giving me all sorts of suggestions like "just buying a new cylinder", etc. I want to know the answer to the specific question I posted. The reason for my question is that I want to identify the size of a certain bolt and it happens to match the ones in the rim cylinders. I figured somebody on this newsgroup would know the answer to THAT question and then I'd have my answer!
Joy
: Does anyone know the size of the bolts used to install a standard garage : door rim cylinder lock? There are two bolts and I'm pretty sure the : threads are 24 per inch. I am looking for the correct tap and die and am : not sure of the diameter. I'm pretty sure it is NOT 1/4-24 or 12-24. : : Thanks! : : Joy
Reply to
Joy
Wrong. If anything threaded in smoothly why would he be trying to chase it out to begin with. Make sure of the size and thread pitch FIRST.
Reply to
Steve
You aren't giving a whole lot of information. Is it smaller or larger than 1/4? Is it smaller or larger than 6mm? Could it be 10-24? Standard pitches for 1/4 are 20 or 28 TPI so if it really is 24 TPI it probably is not 1/4 but could be either #10 or #12. Again is it smaller or larger than those sizes? Metric? Be advised that many metric tap and die sets only have even sizes i.e. 6 8 10 12 etc but there are infrequently used sizes in between like 5mm 7mm and 9mm that you are not going to find in a lot of sets and will have to source individually from a fastener supplier or other specialized dealer. There are also occaisionally proprietary threads/sizes of fastener. I have seen a true 10mm metric bolt factory threaded 16TPI standard for example, although things like that are very uncommon.
Reply to
Steve
"Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61**spamblock##@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:466575b0$0$4698$ snipped-for-privacy@roadrunner.com...
well this PDF shows an Ilco Rim Cyl as using a 12-24
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Reply to
Key
Even different for same products. British Yale rim cylinders changed from Whitworth (I presume) to metric when UK metricated (industry metricated but there has been some backlash to conversion at consumer level).
Reply to
peterwn
.
There was also some changes made prior to British metrification. Besides Whitworth there is UN class threads, this came about as there were minor differences that were causing some grief in WWII with the old standard National class. Both were 60 degree threads, but the Brits had a little different shape on the peeks and the valleys than the US did, and this wreaked havoc trying to fix aircraft. Whitworth has if I recall a 55 degree thread.
The OP could have anything on the rim cyl as their never has been a standard for interchange on the screws but it is probably some sort of identifiable size. If it was metric, it could be that it has a 1 mm pitch which is pretty close to the 24 tpi that was suggested as that would be 25.4 tpi and it might seem to be right with the thread gage.
A measurement of the major diameter would probably be the best place to start to identify the thread over Usenet. You listening Joy?
Reply to
Roger Shoaf
Who the fuck knows? Theres no such thing as a "standard garage door rim cylinder lock". They can use whatever size and thread the factory wants. You got a thread gauge and you are apparently using the damn thing on a bolt that fits the thing take a mic or caliper and measure the fucking thing with that. You could do that in 2 minutes compared to fucking around here for days.
Reply to
Punch Job
First, thanks to all those who tried to help. I should have given an approx diameter but assumed it would be assumed since I assumed you all know what a standard garage door rim cylinder and its screws look like. Three assumptions is a triple mistake!
I made a mistake. It seems like the screws to my rim cylinder ARE 12-24 like some people said. A 12-24 nut that fit the rim cylinder screw also seemed to fit the screw in question so I assumed they were the same. They are not. A nut doesn't have enough threads for a good comparison test. Another bad assumption. Not a good day.
So... the question is irrelevant now. But I did learn things I didn't know before so all was not wasted. And just about every rim cylinder I've seen uses interchangeable (12-24) bolts. I'm in New Jersey.
And I often use a tap and die to check threads and it seems to work fairly well as long as I don't force it.
Thanks again for the help and sorry for the bag-load of assumptions.
Joy
Reply to
Joy
What is a "standard" garage door rim cylinder?????
You all but ruled that size out in your first post, and there are a lot of rim cylinders out there that do not use 12-24 fasteners.

Reply to
DB
We all tend to outsmart ourselves at one time or another.
A nut doesn't
A nut should be able to work for thread identification.
Now just don't waste a lot of time looking for 12-24 socket head cap screws, I got pissed when I was trying to find these at the hardware stores and I found out that no one makes them. This is a good item to send the apprentice to fetch. right along with sesamee seed hot dog buns and cashews in the shell.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf

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