Durability of Kevlar In High Wear Environment

Could braided Kevlar fishing line under 10% test strength tension withstand a few weeks of continuous sandblasting?
Bret Cahill

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Bret Cahill wrote, On 2/5/2009 11:20 AM:

Probably not. Do you mean that the string will be exposed to the direct spray from commercial sand blasting equipment?
There is a wide variability in abrasive power from sand blasting equipment depending on the type of abrasive used, the relative size of the equipment, and the velocity of the particles. From my own experience, I've seen a modest sized sand blaster with a 1/2" orifice, using silicon carbide abrasive, erode a hole trough a 1/2" thick aluminum plate in about 40 seconds.
--

Paul D Oosterhout
I work for SAIC (but I don't speak for SAIC)
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The softest grit available at 20 m/sec.

How about a very light weight butyl tubing -- about 0.1 gms/cm -- to protect the line?
Bret Cahill
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Bret Cahill wrote:

If a 3 ft length of such line is selected, and pulled repeatedly through a fold of fine sandpaper, then a test of its ultimate strength before/after would answer that question neatly.
Materials: Test line Fishermans scales One sheet of fine sandpaper.
Hope this helps
Brian W
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Probably why snook fishermen don't use it.
Bret Cahill
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My experience with sandblasting is that stiff / resistive materials get eaten away.... flexible / compliance materials much less so.
As Paul mentioned, aluminum is gone in seconds...I seen rubber last for days. Glass gets etched / frosted immediately... soft PVC tubing not.
Kevlar (solid items) strikes me as stiff not rubbery. Kevlar line? I dont know, not a fisherman.
Protect it with Tygon tubing. That will last quite a while for sure.
Am I correct in assuming that the line is being used to suspend an object for blasting? What is the application?
cheers Bob
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