how many ways to cut a material?

I'm thinking that there are three possible ways to cut any material...
1. oxidize it along the cut line. For example, burning through with
an oxy- acetylene torch. This is often called "burning" in the metal trades.
2. tear it apart with a force that exceeds the tensile strength. I don't know the proper term for this process.
3. push through it with a force that exceeds the compressive strength. I also don't know the proper term for this process.
Am I correct?
what tools do what? For example, what exactly does a scissors do? Is that different than what a knife does?
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Alan Horowitz wrote:

No oxidation in inert envirinments with ortch or laser
many materials can be melted or vaporized without oxidation
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Alan Horowitz wrote:

4. Water jet cutting.
5. Sandblasting.
6. E-beam cutting.
7. EDM.
8. Chemical milling.
I'm sure I could think of others, if I bothered to spend another 30 seconds thinking about it.
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Alan Horowitz wrote:

Also melt it and pour the results into little molds.
Bob Kolker
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alanh snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Alan Horowitz) wrote:

-- Laser, plasma, etc cut. Using heat sums it up.

-- Not practical. Little comtrol over where it'd break unless part had a reduced section.

-- That's shearing as with a die and press. High velocity water is used to cuts some materials.

-- Shear, the same basic action for both.
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alanh snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Alan Horowitz) wrote:

A lot of other methods have already been suggested. Another one that comes to mind: ultrasonic cutting.
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Failure Modes: Gross yielding Buckling Creep Brittle fracture Fatigue, low cycle Fatigue, high cycle Contact fatigue Fretting Corrosion Stress-corrosion cracking Galvanic corrosion Hydrogen embrittlement Wear Thermal fatigue Corrosion fatigue
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Shearing Bearing Compression Adiabatic Shear Melting Over-aging Thermal shock
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Tom Walz wrote: >>Alan Horowitz wrote:
>>> I'm thinking that there are three possible ways to cut any material...

Those are all failure modes, not manufacturing processes.
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Dear Jeff Finlayson:

material...
Die stamping

Dropping a building

Injection molding

Jack hammer

Brinnelling to improve surface condition (but not for cutting in two) Sandblasting as a machining process

*Some* of them are used in manufacturing. Some of the others are used by artists to provide interesting surfaces.
David A. Smith
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N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc) wrote:

-- Of course they are, no duh. But failure modes aren't manufacturing processes.
> Some of the others are used by artists to provide interesting surfaces.

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