How many?

I have a personal rule that if I've had an exposed flame in the workshop
(welding etc) I won't leave the workshop for half an hour after I've put it
out and turned the gas off. This dates back many years when I was told by a
fire officer that any fire will show itself by smoke, flame or smell within
20 minutes. Dunno if it's true, but it makes sense to me, so I do it.
Anyway, this often means I'm sat on the stool mooning calf-like at my Toy of
the Moment and planning the next move, but sometimes I'm just generally
communing with my hoard - sad old miser that I am. Last night, I idly
wondered just how many engines I'd contrived to gather into one place in the
last - what? - three years? - and did a reasonably accurate count up,
counting only engines that actually go or which are so complete that it will
not take more than a day's work to fire them up and I didn't begin to
consider driven devices like generators, pumps, compressors, vacuum pumps et
al.
Oh dear ............
What's an average number of engines to gather around you? Should I worry? Is
Hazel right?
Regards,
J. Kim Siddorn,
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
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I wouldn't worry, Kim, I think there's a formula based on the size of the available accomodation, and the size of the collector.
Basically, if you can squeeze past the collection and get to the bench without injury , you're within the normal parameters.
If, like me, you have to climb over engines to get to the bench, then professional psychological help is needed ;-)
Regards, Napoleon, oops, I mean Arthur G
Sign seen on roadworks in Ireland "Inane realignment - funded by the EU"
Reply to
Arthur G
"Arthur G" wrote (snip):-
professional psychological help is needed ;-)
You can find your bench? I'm envious ;-)
Reply to
Nick H
In a similar vein I'm currently building a storage shed/bunker at the bottom of the garden away from everything else to keep petrol, paraffin, diesel bottles of gas etc. in so that they aren't all in the workshop or engine sheds.
As for engines there's a permanent collection of about 20, a further fluid collection of between 5 and 10 on top of that, a couple still to fetch, the model engines on the mantelpiece.....
I think this Newsgroup could have a very interesting rally on our own with all the stuff we have between us!
Regards
Dan
And no, I can't get to my bench as there's a Crossley TSH in front of it ;-)
Reply to
Dan Howden
Several more than you have room for.
Not at all. A collection will expand to fill the space , and then some. Nature abhors a vacuum, and also an empty shed :-)
Regards
Philip T-E
Reply to
ClaraNET
You've got room for a bench? Now there's a thing! :))
Reply to
Mark Howard
Do you insist on an integral number or do fractions count? i.e. "Entire" engines (like "Entire" horses?)
Jack in Oz
Reply to
Jack Watson
"Jack Watson" wrote
Well, I counted engines which have all their major components and don't require transplant surgery to make 'em go. However, one or two might need magnetos and a larger number fuel tanks, -- Regards,
J. Kim Siddorn,
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
If you sit equidistant from them all, then you'll do nothing.....
When you have to pay for external storage, you are probably getting near to the point where you will 'have' to do something.... we reached that point a while ago, and began a reduction process which is slow but ongoing.
We may be moving the factory at some time, and if we can get a larger unit then the company stuff that we currently store can go, leaving a bit more room.
The biggest hoggers of space are the machines, not the engines.
Peter
Reply to
Peter A Forbes
Gentlemen,
Tommorrow I shall go and visit my good friend Dan and relieve him of one of his engines, a Lister L, thats where the problem will begin because I know that it wont go in my garage workshop :-(( so other arrangements will apply, as to the bench syndrome I have solved that by placing it as near to the door of the garage as possible and also having it on wheels with the electric sockets etc on a flying lead so that if it is a nice day I can work outside. I dont know if anybody has noticed but if you place two engines in close proximity to each other they breed or so I tell my good lady :-))
Martin P
Reply to
Campingstoveman
Sooooo glad it's not just me that can't find his bench - you made me happy.
Can you suggest the name of a suitable therapist Arthur???
In message , Nick H writes
Reply to
john. ambler
"john. ambler" wrote >
Can you suggest the name of a suitable therapist Arthur???
I don't know his name, John, every time he calls I run away and hide :-)
Arthur G
Reply to
Arthur Griffin & Jeni Stanton
Answers in order Too many Yes Probably
John
Reply to
John Manders
Gentlemen, Just be thankfull that your engines are relatively small (Paul's collection excepted) Vehicles are much larger. Spare a thought for those poor souls who are devotees of lorries and busses.
John
Reply to
John Manders
I'd love a Scammell Super Contractor or a Thornycroft Mighty Antar outside....:-)) They really clear the way in traffic jams!!
Peter
Reply to
Peter A Forbes
We left our Scammell Super Constructor behind in the Isle Of Man (15 litre Albion engine) :-)
Paul
-- ____________________________________
Internal Fire, Museum of Power, Wales
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Internal Fire Museum of Power is a Not-for-Profit company registered in the UK
Reply to
Paul Evans
Albion engine) :-)
Shame on you! :-))
I had a drive in a Mighty Antar some years ago when I first got my HGV licence. It was a pretty intimidating experience, but very worthwhile.
It was crude, almost to the point of hardship inside the cab but the mechanicals worked well enough, this one had a big R-R diesel IIRC.
Peter
Reply to
Peter A Forbes
Antar had a RR Meteorite. Most of the Super Constructor Scammells had supercharged RR 6 cylinder N series. The story we were told at Pickfords Birmingham was that they used to carry a large drum of engine oil in the cab of a Rolls powered Scammell with a tube going to the filler. Every 5 minutes they would turn the tap on for 30 secs to replace the oil the engine had just used/leaked/eaten.
Pickfords then specified the 900 series Albion for their Super Constructors, normally aspirated and a good solid lump.
Ours was 876 BGJ based at Brum. I had the cab completely rebuilt but the doors still needed doing along with the rear body - money pit. A lot nicer to drive than the earlier Scammells as they were fitted with a Self Changing Gears 8 speed box instead of the 6 speed Scammell gate change. Regret selling it but it was one of the things that had to go to fund the museum, along with fast cars, fast bikes and medium speed women.
Paul
-- ____________________________________
Internal Fire, Museum of Power, Wales
formatting link
Internal Fire Museum of Power is a Not-for-Profit company registered in the UK
Reply to
Paul Evans
Don't be silly, Martin, how can engines possibly breed, they're all female!!!!!
Reply to
CHARLES HAMILTON
I'd settle for " KOLOSS" owned by "ABNORMAL LOAD ENGINEERING"(Anyone seen it?) Not exactly sure what breed it is (Faun??) but it would look nice on my front!!
Reply to
CHARLES HAMILTON

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