Homebuilt laser cutter pictures

Hi all,
We have built a computer controlled C02 laser for cutting and engraving.
Thought some of you may be interested to have a look.
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Any comments are welcome.
Cheers, Tony
Reply to
Tony Burch
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That is really neat. I appreciate that approach to building something that otherwise is a big, expensive machine. You did a good job. Richard
Reply to
Richard
Dear Tony Burch:
You might change "C02" to "CO2" in the page title. Why didn't you put a "stepper motor" on the focus? Only intend to do planar constructions? Just curious.
Pretty cool!
David A. Smith
Reply to
N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)
"N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)" wrote .
If this is turned into an x, y as well as z system with sharp focus, it would be similar to the 3-D laser engraving system being sold to make small decorative artworks out of glass blocks.
John
Reply to
John C
That's very neat. Very clean construction too.
Do you have phots / clips of it in action? (Eg: is there anyhitng worth seeing when it's working?).
I rememebr watching a laser engraving machine at work some years ago ... I don't recall the type of laser...
Cheers, Alan
Reply to
Alan Browne
Hi David, thanks! Thanks for pointing out the 0->O. I though about putting a stepper motor on the focus, but I just wanted to get the machine running as quickly as possible, so I just put a slot with a bolt and a wingnut. My initial application is cutting sheet acrylic. Cheers, Tony
"N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)" wrote in message news:7tIge.5807$eU.4139@fed1read07...
Reply to
Tony Burch
Hi John, oh, so that's how they do that glass block artwork - I hadn't thought about that. If I put a stepper motor driven focus on the lens, then I might be able to try something like that. Cheers, Tony
Reply to
Tony Burch
Hi Alan, thanks for your kind comments. The photos on the website were actually taken while the machine was cutting. The CO2 beam is invisible, which makes it less spectacular, but more dangerous because you can't see where the beam is. At the moment I don't have video of the machine running, but the photos give a reasonable idea of how it all works. Cheers, Tony
Reply to
Tony Burch
Tony, I have seen these glass decorative artworks in shops, but have not used nor seen the engraving systems. One shop takes order to do 2D engraving out of supplied portrait photos, or do 3D engraving (inside glass blocks) after taking perhaps a 3D scanner photo of the customer.
To find out more, one easy way is to search with Google,
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I've just tried keying in 3D laser engraving of glass, and I got quite a few useful hits. I notice some even have prices of the systems.
Have fun, John
"Tony Burch" wrote ..
Reply to
John C
John C & Tony Burch:
Excellent advice to do a search. The 3D engraving requires more than one laser (beam), as I recall. The "bubble pattern" is formed at the confluence of two beams, which can be directed into 3D space.
David A. Smith
Reply to
N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)
Nice job Tony, but for more accuracy I would brace the "nutplate" of the leadscrews, or else move the "nuts" closer to the support-rails. As it is you are vulnarable to position-hysteresis. However, if the current repeatability is sufficient for the type of work you use it for, never mind. Care to tell us what the $ investment ballpark was?
Rudi
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