crushing of coke

Our company has been asked to quote a cone crusher for use in crushing coke.
Maximum feed size of 6" crushed down to 1/2"-. Our main experience is in
providing crushers for aggregate production and have no direct experience
with coke. I know very little about coke other than it is coal with the
volatile components baked out of it for use as a carbon source for steel
manufacture. The only crushing related information is that it is not
particularly abrasive but rather sticky and plastic in consistency. It has
been described as not unlike recycled asphalt from the standpoint of
crushing.
Any information on crushing coke in general and crushing coke with a cone
crusher in particular would be read with great interest. If not too much
trouble please copy replies to:
j snipped-for-privacy@efn.org
snipped-for-privacy@jcieug.com
Jon Juhlin
Reply to
Jon Juhlin
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Try a search on google. "Metallurgical Coke Crushing" returned 1,530 hits. As an old blast furnace operator, I found coke to be quite abrasive. Changed coke screens about twice a year at the blast furnaces, as I remember. It is only sticky & plastic in the coke ovens as it transists from coal to coke via heating in the absence of air.
J> Our company has been asked to quote a cone crusher for use in crushing coke.
Reply to
David Kercsmar
I have not used a cone crusher for coke. I know of a rod mill using high carbon pearlitic steel rods and a rubber liner. I seem to remember a temporary jaw crusher which probably had Hadfields manganese jaws, but I do not know if coke would give much workhardening on hadfields manganese. The crushing strength is probably known by your customer as it is probably important for their customers.
In general terms coke is easy to crush compared to most rock. It is also not very abrasive. Be careful if asked to work with sinter (for iron production) as this is very abrasive.
Reply to
David Deuchar
Coke used in blast furnace is very abrasive in nature. I have just completed supply of high chrome iron liner plates used in a hopper for a steel plant. Earlier high manganese steel was used which would wear out soon.
Reply to
Arun Rao
In order for high manganese steels to work well they need to work harden, coke being light does not do this well compared to say iron ore. This does not mear to me that coke is abrasive just that the choice of high manganese is not appropriate. There is little point in arguing over coke abrasiveness, any material being transported will cause some wear.
Reply to
David Deuchar
Indian coke is notorious for its high sulphur,phosphorous and ash content. This extremely high levels of silica in ash contributes to the wear. I agree that hadfield steel is a wrong choice for this application,but the practice is to use hadfield steel for the past 45 years. Only now this has been given due consideration.
Reply to
Arun Rao
Thanks for the lively discussion of my question.
As I suspected, this material has low compressive strength and so would be ineffective for work hardening the hadfield's manganese. Although it sounds like this has been done in the past (with cones or jaws?). If the question of liner wear were the only problem, I suspect we could work around that if the hourly tonnage were high enough.
The other thing I worry about is any tendency for the material to form "pancakes" which is likely if the material is sticky and plastic. This is bad for cone crushers as it fills up the discharge area of the crushing chamber inducing "bowl float" which is very destructive to the crusher.
Any experience in this regard?
Jon Juhlin Crusher Project Engineer JCI Eugene, Or
consistency. It
Reply to
Jon Juhlin

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