wear testing

can anybody provide me guidance in wear testing for analysis of wear mechanisms in steel???
will Pin on disc method work for non mettalic interfaces?
I want to work with steel and glass interface.
kindly reply
BG
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Check out the ASM Handbooks, Volumes 8 and 18 for information. www.asm-international.org
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snipped-for-privacy@rediffmail.com wrote:

BG
Wear testing using standardized samples such pin on disk, three-balls-in-socket, rubbing disk, etc. have no bases in reality since the wear systems of any "standardized test" and the application are very different.
Best practice is to build a prototype of the machine (or small subsection of the full size machine) and test it directly measuring material loss (wear) via dimensional loss and gravimetric (weight) loss. Protoype and subsection testing more closely duplicates the wear systems in the actual machine application. Accelerated testing using stanardized samples or even prototype testing is a risk - wear systems are often velocity and time depenedent and hence the output of an experiment is confounded with time.
good luck
Ed
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Thankyou very much for your reply.
I have a possiblity of conducting wear test on pilot plant simulating actual process, I can produce the worn surface with this pilot plant but my main intention is understing wear mechanism and for that I need to do metallurgical analysis of this surface with SEM or AFM.
Can you guide me, how can I proceed for this?
thanks for your help, BG
Ed wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@rediffmail.com wrote:

BG
An SEM will show you changes in surface morphology during wear if replica samples are taken of the subject aticle peroidically - or if the article can be examined directly.
IMHO the atomic force microscpe (AFM) is to "close to the action" to show anything useful - also returning to the same location to deterimine changes from wear over time are problematic. Using EDS and X-ray mapping in a SEM - asuming the rubbing surfaces are chemically different would be more useful. Examination of collected wear debris (using wash fluids or adhesive tape in dry situation) will give insight into primary and secondary wear mechanisms.
ICP of the wear debris may also tell you exactly what is wear the most. A metallographic cross section of the wear surface may show if fracture or deformation are predominate in specific wear of metals.
Ed
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