1kg Steel Melting Furnace on eBay

Based on the nameplate rating in the picture on eBay it looks like it would be about 5KW, or about $0.50/hr to operate.
Regards, Bob Headrick
Reply to
Bob Headrick
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For those of you who might be interested, we just listed a new small steel
melting induction furnace (1kg capacity, fast melt) on eBay, item #
200115158055. This unit can be run using household power. Here's the eBay
link:
formatting link

Tim
Reply to
Tim J.
--Just outta curiosity does anyone know how much power it takes to melt 1kg in an induction furnace; i.e. what's the electric bill like?
Reply to
steamer
If you have to ask you can't afford it...
I heard the electric bill for one of our data centers runs about $250k... per month!
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
As mentioned by another poster, at 5kW and assuming $0.06 per kWh (as it is here in Vancouver), that would translate to about $0.30 per hour (yes that's 30 cents per hour). I'm not sure which system the 250k number is based on but I know that it takes almost nothing to run this small furnace - there are customers that run these machines in two 8 hour shifts every day in the jewelry industry.
Tim
Reply to
Tim J.
According to the name plate pix it takes 22 amps on ordinary (220-230 V single-phase) residential current. At 11 cents/KWH that would be around 65 cents per hour.
Reply to
Robert Swinney
(220-230 V
Melting cast iron with my induction furnace I recently used 3.8 kWh to melt a 3Kg ingot - having fitted a re-settable kWh meter to my 100kVA diesel generator I make a habit of resetting it before each melt. Obviously s/s will be more as the melting point is higher, although the latent heat of liquifaction may be a bit less.
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Where did you get it and how much did it cost?
Wes
Reply to
Wes
100kVA
What? The ingot, or the generator, or the kWh meter, or the induction furnace. !
The answer to all of them is eBay, and loads of dosh ! (except the ingot thinking about it)
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
OK, here is a quote from a recent posting of mine in the electrocast group, that breaks down the figures:
Having fitted a digital resettable three phase kWh meter to my 100 kVA generator, I thought it would be amusing to see what sort of overall efficiency I'm running at in terms of electricity input to molten iron output.
A few assumptions:
1/ I melted approx 3kgs of white iron 2/ Ambient temperature was 13 deg C 3/ The iron melted at 1535 deg C 4/ It was super heated to 1635 deg C 5/ Specific heat of iron is 0.449 J/g degK 6/ Latent heat of liquifation of white iron is 138 KJ/Kg (suprising difference with grey iron at 95 KJ/Kg)
There are three phases:
a/ Raise iron from room temp to melting point b/ Stuff in enough energy to melt it overcoming the latent heat c/ Super heat by a further 100 deg C
By my calculations (but please check them)
a/ uses 0.569 Kwh b/ uses 0.115 Kwh c/ uses 0.012 Kwh
Thus a total at 100% efficiency should be 0.696 kWh I measured usage of 3.8 kWh so:
18.3% efficiency
Now of course heat is lost in the electronics, in the walls of the crucible, and in the various cables, but 18.3% is pretty staggeringly low I reckon, especially as it takes no account of the energy being piled into my water cooling plant, nor the 1 hp coolant circulating pump.
If I did the same calculations from the diesel in the generator tank to molten iron, and allowed for the other factors mentioned above as well I reckon I'd be down into single figures of efficiency !!!!
AWEM
Wed May 9, 2007 7:45 pm
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Reply to
Andrew Mawson

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