55 Gallon Drums

Hey all, I know it's a bit OT but...
Who knows a supplier for the steel 55 gallon drums in the New England
(MA) area? I need for some burning and waste removal, as i dinna want
to F**kup my lawn. The home despot don't got them, nor Lowes.
Google searches have just led me to like "Industral Waste Containers"
and "UN Certified Disposal Containers" Big prices for a bucket...
I just want to buy a damn 55 gallon drum like you see in the State
parks and have a fire in and may puke in during a kegger...
Thanks.
Fred
Reply to
Phred
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Look for a company that does a lot of fiberglassing, Before I moved south, I worked for a company in Frankfort NY who fiberglassed large steel tanks. We had to pay big bucks to have the old 55g drums removed as they contained industrial waste. gary
Reply to
Gary Owens
Check with the local commercial cabinet shops . We get contact cement in 55 gal drums and the supplier doesn't want them back . They tend to become clutter at some point ...
Reply to
Snag
Ck with your John Deere dealer they get oil in nonreturnable drums.
Reply to
Ralph Henrichs
Check Craigslist. That's where I find my drums.
Reply to
Gary Brady
As an alternative, use a stack of old truck tire rims. The tire shops that do trucks periodically get bent or cracked rims that are no longer of use. I've got a stack of 4 of them on top of cinder blocks (just take one block away and you can shovel out the ash from the bottom) and am doing my part to make Al Gore melt. A 55 gal drum lasts a year. Tire rims last at least 5 years.
RWL
Reply to
geolane_NOSPAM_
Now, that's a darn fine idea. I go to the local tire shops and get old rims for all sorts of uses. Mainly paint stands for painting wrought iron, but they are handy for a lot of other things. Never woulda thought of them for making a burning barrel. Wouldn't take a lot to weld some short two inch pieces of rebar on the outside of each to help keep them in a column, either. When you're done, and it's cool, just topple the column, and dispose of the ash, and restack.
I think I'll try one this season at the cabin. I currently use a 55 gal barrel with rebar grating in it, and strategically placed pickax holes and .357 holes. We do a lot of burning of underbrush, and I was surprised at how fast the ash builds up into a glob that you have to then dispose of. I thought it would have just flown away, but it doesn't. It's hard to get the ash out because you have to topple the barrel and get it out the top.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
Around here SD CA we use commercial clothes washer drums. All those little holes look cool with the fire leaping out. (Assuming you were talking about burning.)
Reply to
daniel peterman
Think about a piece of tubing with no bottom. We have burned our yard waste, etc. in a 55 gallon drum for years and they really don't last very long. Recently I bought a piece of tubing about the same size as 55 gallon drum at an auction and I intend to use that instead of a drum for the rest of my life. A short piece of culvert would work, just don't stand close to it for a while when burning, if it is galvanized. Shovelling the ashes out of the drum is no fun. Much easier to lift the tube (or the truck rims) off the ashes. Several poster have mentioned the idea of getting your drums from businesses the get chemistry in them. Especially if the material is combustible and if you will have to remove the top---- A cutting torch could ignite whatever-it-was. Even a spark from a saw or a chisel could do it. Be careful.
Pete Stanaitis --------------
Phred wrote:
Reply to
spaco
A lot of firms won't give them away for fear of the drum later being found in the newest superfund site which gets them a lesson in what 'deep pockets' mean.
The best drums are ones that have a liner in them, these have a removable top so they can get the liner. I've seen these used with adhesives and heavy silicon. If you latch on to one of them, grab the lid, keeping the ashes dry adds to the longevity of the barrel.
Wes S
Reply to
clutch
That's the kind our shop gets contact cement in and the supplier don't want 'em back . We currently have about 8 or 10 out in the yard , come n get 'em . No liners though , so that first burn is gonna be a doozie .
Reply to
Snag
The best i used was a drum made by rolling a 4x8 of expanded steel into a drum shape, weld or bend the edges to stay together. This thing gets enough air for complete combustion, once it's burning well even green stuff goes up. I used a round section of screen 6 inches above ground, but that just bocks up with ash anyway.
Reply to
Stupendous Man
Hi Fred,
Lots of good ideas so far...
If you don't mind a bit of work try some of your local plumbing suppliers and look for old water bladder tanks. Most of these are warranted and you can find returned tanks that look just like new with bladder problems. They are a bit thicker than 55 gallon drums and come in all shapes and sizes. The supplier may be more than glad to get rid of them for nothing due to the bladder inside and not so easy to remove it. At least that used to be the case around here. This is what I have been using for many years now. The last one I cut the top off of and pulled out the bladder has lasted for something like 3 or 4 years now. I can't remember for sure.
Reply to
Leon Fisk
Someone gave me one a while a go..but Id not suggest making afire in it..it appears to be fiberglass
Gunner
"Deep in her heart, every moslem woman yearns to show us her tits" John Griffin
Reply to
Gunner
I get them free from an industrial paint contractor, or if I'm in a hurry I pay a local honey distributor $10 for a clean one that was used to import honey. They usually have a couple thousand on hand. Too bad that you're not in the sunny south. :)
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
I use mine horizontal, with a two foot tall flue and spark arrestor. They usually last three years, if used weekly. If you lined one with fire mortar, they would last a lot longer. I have had a fire in one for almost three weeks when I burnt several very moldy sets of Thomcat catalogs, along with a quart of used motor oil. There was less than a shovel full of ash left.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
On Sat, 27 Jan 2007 18:19:22 -0500, Phred scribed:
Wow! Great suggestions!
I really just need to get rid of some organic waste and dead tree limbs from the property, use the ash as fertilizer for the impending vegetable garden we will start next spring.
I reckon I can drop a few of these on the driveway, light them up and not have too bad a lawn destruction or other problems.
I will call around to a few of the places you all mentioned and see what I can find. Certainly not looking for anything that held industrial waste as the ash goes in the garden...
Thanks for all your help!
Fred
Reply to
Phred
It's been a while, but...
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Reply to
Steve Ackman

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