Acme threaded stuff

Every now and then someone bemoans the fact that they can't find a particular acme threaded something. If you can't find it at MSC or
someplace like that, try here:
http://www.greenbaymfgco.com /
This company supplies lots of acme threaded supplies. The even sell square holes!
Pete Stanaitis
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And they even sell the round pegs, for those of us so inclined.
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wrote:

Damnit..even THEY dont make a 7/8-5
Ive got a great little combo horizontal /verticle, R8 with power feeds, two 2hp motors, all the arbors and end mill holders..and the cute little bitch STILL sits in my shop with a blown nut
And none of my lathes will cut a 5 tpi.
Mumble mumble
Gunner
Rule #35 "That which does not kill you, has made a huge tactical error"
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Doesnt that just mean you need to scrounge another lathe up?
Gunner wrote:

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Oooooh..I LIKE the way you think!
Sigh..but..Ive actually run out of room. For real. But..that means I need to scrounge up a bigger building!
Yesssss!!
Thank you !
Gunner

Rule #35 "That which does not kill you, has made a huge tactical error"
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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 07:35:41 GMT, Gunner

=========================I have never tried this myself, but it appears quite durable repairs can be done use the old fashioned method of babbeting the nut, and the new fangled methods of injecting teflon/epoxy such as moglice.
Anyone have any actual "hands on" with either method?
Unka' George (George McDuffee) .............................. Only in Britain could it be thought a defect to be "too clever by half." The probability is that too many people are too stupid by three-quarters.
John Major (b. 1943), British Conservative politician, prime minister. Quoted in: Observer (London, 7 July 1991).
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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 08:16:30 -0600, F. George McDuffee

see http://www.practicalmachinist.com/cgi-bin/ubbcgi/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t2744;p=0
Unka' George (George McDuffee) .............................. Only in Britain could it be thought a defect to be "too clever by half." The probability is that too many people are too stupid by three-quarters.
John Major (b. 1943), British Conservative politician, prime minister. Quoted in: Observer (London, 7 July 1991).
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"F. George McDuffee" wrote:

I use mogolice on way repair but would not use it on a nut since nurs are easy to make and I can't have a new nut fail on a customers machine.
Inserts are easy to come by if you look. You dont necessarily have to have the proper insert for the pitch. If you have a smaller one you can shift the compound and enlarge the width of the thread to match the pitch. I would recommend handgrinding some tool steel and use an unworn section of the screw for a gauge... Make sure you have enough clearance for the helix angle. I may even have some acme taps for that pitch nut. Just finished doing some wierd pitch (.395) double lead stuff. Custom propriatory threads. ( thats not really the correct pitch. its proproatory :) but you get the idea.) Top notch type inserts would be what I use for most acme threads. Get yourself an acme pitch gauge and it makes hand grinding a hss tool easy. Just remember the helix relief.
John
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Gunner wrote:

No universal mill? At 5 tpi, it's more practical to go with milling the thread, you start picking up a whole lot of side thrust with that amount of translation per rev. One of the Village Press mags had a recent article on using the epoxy-type repair compounds for repairing a leadscrew and nut, the guy had to do a whole lot of extra work because the screw wasn't worn uniformly. Not sure that making a new one wasn't easier by the time he got done.
Stan
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On 11 Nov 2006 06:37:24 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@prolynx.com wrote:

I have this perfect..and I mean Perfect...Hales mill. Its been variously badged as Yamazan, Jet and so forth. Its about 2/3 the size of a Bridgport, with a horizontal spindle under the ram. Nice big motor for x axis power feed, micrometer downfeed, dials are inch and 1 turn =.2
It had been hit on the end of the table the second month it was on the floor, by a forklift, which pushed the lead screw through the X axis nut. Harmed nothing except gutted the nut. So they locked the table down, and put on a air powered feed unit on the table and used it to slit some parts. Ultra low time. Well..the plastic hoses for the Bejur oiler need replacing ..which I already have the hoses. One of my A list customers. The mill was made in 1984, Taiwan and probably has less than 1000 hours of run time on the horizontal spindle. Period. The verticle was never run. And they tossed in a a very large rack full of R8 endmill holders, drill chuck holder and so forth. The nut looks identical to that on a Bridgeport..but scaled down. Has the backlash adjustment and so forth.
They needed the floor space to put in another CNC mill so told me to haul it off. Its been sitting in the To Do section of my shop for two years now..and I REALLY want to get it up and running. This is one Im NOT going to sell, as its a perfect size for the home shop..and if I ever have to down size..this will go with me.
I gave the nut to a buddy, but he hasnt gotten around to making the nut..it of course requires the proper insert..and they are rare. Getting him to hand grind a HSS bit..aint happening anytime soon.
Gunner
Rule #35 "That which does not kill you, has made a huge tactical error"
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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 16:26:33 GMT, Gunner
<snip>

<snip> What size thread do you have and is it Acme [29 degree] or ISO/DIN trapizoid [30 degree] profile? What size HSS bit does his (or your) bar take?
Unka' George (George McDuffee) .............................. Only in Britain could it be thought a defect to be "too clever by half." The probability is that too many people are too stupid by three-quarters.
John Major (b. 1943), British Conservative politician, prime minister. Quoted in: Observer (London, 7 July 1991).
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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 12:23:42 -0600, F. George McDuffee

No idea. Looks to be pretty much standard 29 degree. But Ill have to put it on a comparator and check
Gunner

"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 16:26:33 GMT, Gunner
<snip>

<snip> With a little more surfing:
see: http://www.roton.com/Mating_Components.aspx?familyp60204 http://www.roton.com/Mating_Components.aspx?familyq60204 http://www.roton.com/Default.aspx
I don't know if they use UPS or Brinks.....
Unka' George (George McDuffee) .............................. Only in Britain could it be thought a defect to be "too clever by half." The probability is that too many people are too stupid by three-quarters.
John Major (b. 1943), British Conservative politician, prime minister. Quoted in: Observer (London, 7 July 1991).
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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 12:48:07 -0600, F. George McDuffee

Brinks from the looks of it.
That bronze sleeve would work well. And I could saw it in half and make a spare.
Thanks for the link
Gunner

"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
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Gunner wrote:

My Harisson M300 does 5 TPI. I've had the lathe about 5 years and only recently realised it had a universal changebox so I can cut metric and imperial without altering anything, I suspect the metric is an approximation in this case.
Regarding your 5TPI my neighbour used the Harisson to cut a 2TPI twin start square thread recently for his dining room table. The nut in the opening/closing jack had finally given up after about 150 years so a new one had to be made. 2 TPI is as low as it goes. The nut came out without a hitch.
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Gunner wrote:

Any real reason not to convert to an vailable size. 3/4-5 or 1"-5 ?
Can your lathe do 10 TPI? If so, root through the geartrain and see if you can drop in a gear or gears that doubles the output speed to the gearbox, and use the 10 TPI setting. You may run into velocity issues and have to handcrank the cuts, but for a short job, no biggie!
Cheers Trevor Jones
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wrote:

Yes. The leadscew is perfect.

The largest thread an HLV-H will do..is 11. Period.
Shrug
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
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Gunner wrote:

No, no, no, nooo, dude!
The largest thread it will do without having to muck with gears is 11. :-)
(I'll hedge that by saying that other than drooling on the odd one, I do not have a pile of intimate experience with a HLV-H.)
Got gears between the spindle and the gearbox, or are they fixed and immovable?
Set the box to cut 15, and swap gears in to triple the speed of the input side of the box, and you're there. Run really slow spindle rpm.
Upping the tooth count on the spindle gear is the most effective way to do this, on most of the lathes I have seen.
Gotta have some gears around, though, which can be a kicker.
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Trevor Jones wrote:

Lotsa good reading about gears and gear trains here. While the specific answer is not given, think the information is there for you to work out a solution, but it will depend on what gears you have on hand.
Just remember that in the end you need a 5:8 ratio from your spindle to your leadscrew. (I think I got that right, five turns of the spindle equal to 8 turns of the leadscrew, same as 5 tpi) or it's equivalent including the gearing in the box.
If I understand the info from the links below, there is at least one position in the selectors that allows a 1:1 input output ratio through the gearbox.
Then it's a matter of finding the gears to fit the ratio you need on the banjo.
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/12/1231.html

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/12/863.html#000000
I'm pretty sure that I'll be corrected if I got any of this really screwed up, but I think I got my head around it.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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wrote:

Ive got two full sets of auxillary change gears. No joy.
http://www.csparks.com/hardinge/Manual/Page34-35.jpg
http://www.csparks.com/hardinge/Manual/Page36-37.jpg
Excuse me..I can indeed cut a 10 tpi. And thats the biggest
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
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