Advice needed on wiring a motor

I have purchased a 3-phase motor from ebay. It is made by Hitachi and designated as 0.26Kw 4-pole Type EFOUP, Form K. There are two plates on the side, one containing the above data plus the
legend about the two voltages it can handle, namely 100 and 220. The other plate shows 2 diagrams of the wiring for the two voltages. The trouble is, there is no terminal block. Instead, there are 9 wires coming out of the motor and enclosed in a plastic sheath - all black. These 9 wires terminate in a plastic plug with 9 terminals, clearly designed to plug into a socket, but I don't have a clue as to what the socket looks like, and there are no markings on the plug at all. The terminals on the plug are arranged in a 3x3 matrix, and three of them have flats on them so it can be inserted into its socket in one way only. By using a continuity tester I determined which plug terminals are connected to which. The following link shows a copy of the wiring diagrams on the side plate, and a schematic of the plug with the connections as determined by the continuity meter.
http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m266/lemel_man/Hitachi.gif From this it would appear to be configured for the lower voltage, but I need it for the higher voltage. The plug is the type where terminals are pushed through from the back, so they are clearly visible and there are no connections between them in the plug, so all the connections are inside the motor housing.
Can anybody tell me how to change it to 220v please?
--
Regards, Gary Wooding
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    It looks like one of the standard molded nylon connectors. I'm trying to remember whether that style is made by Molex or by AMP -- I think AMP -- I've got some somewhere in the shop. Those flats are the telltale.

    Actually -- you determined which wires are connected to common windings. Typically, a dual voltage motor will be set up like this (view with a fixed pitch font to things will line up properly):
Winding set 1 Winding set 2
(A)-UUUUUUUUU-(B) (C)-UUUUUUUU--+    phase 1 | (D)-UUUUUUUUU-(E) (F)-UUUUUUUU--+ phase 2 | (G)-UUUUUUUUU-(H) (I)-UUUUUUUU--+ phase 3
    Note that the letters which I have used here are for convenience in describing things, and bear little or no relationship to whatever markings the manufacturer probably used.
    All of the right-hand ends of winding 2 are connected together, and are not brought out from the motor.
    For the lower voltage, the right-hand ends of winding 1 are also connected together and otherwise ignored. The left hand end of the two windings on each phase are connected together and to the outside power, thus effectively connecting the two windings in parallel.
    However -- for the higher voltage, the right-hand end of winding 1 of each phase is connected to the left-hand end of winding 2, and the incoming power is connected to the left-hand end of winding 1.
    So -- for our purposes, it looks like my terminals A, D, and G are what they call U1 V1 and W1, and what I called B, E, and H they called Z1, X1, and Y1 -- the other end of the first set of windings.
    U2, V2, and W2 are the left-hand end of the second set of windings, C, F, and I, and are what you measure as "connected together". So -- those are the middle three pins with no flats on any of them.
    Your motor is not connected for either voltage *yet*. That is determined by what is on the mating connector (which you will probably want to get from someplace like Mouser or DigiKey -- unless you have a good electronics store locally where you can walk in and try to find a mating connector.
    Try rotating your connector image from where you traced the conductivity 90 degrees clockwise, so the two pins with flats are on the bottom, and I think that will make it match up with the drawings on the motor, which are certainly set up to match the motor's connector pattern.
    So -- get a mating connector --- and the pins -- and a crimper for the pins, crimp a pin on each of the incoming three phase wires and put those in the three along the side with two flats. Crimp two pins on the ends of three wires perhaps 2" or 3" long, and put them in the connector according to the rest of the "Higher Voltage" drawing, and plug it into the motor. Just to be safe, put a couple of 100W light bulbs in series with each of the incoming three-phase wires (or if you can find them, a single 240V 200W light bulb in series with each line), and you have a safe way to connect it to test. What should happen is that the light bulbs will glow fairly brightly at first, and then as the motor spins up to speed, all three should dim equally. If they don't, or if the motor does not spin up at all, then something is wrong with my analysis of what you have posted.

    This should do it. Be sure to get the mating connectors and the crimper and pins (and a pin extractor would be a good idea in case you make a mistake somewhere in there, or in case I did). You *don't* want to remove the existing connector from the motor, as it makes the data plate on the motor useless.
    I'm not sure how happy this particular motor will be if you have to go up to 240V. Did you try the manufacturer's web site?
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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Hey DoN,
Isn't that the same connector they used on the old black and white monitors in video games?
--.- Dave (whos showing his age)
[snip]

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    I don't know. I've never had a video game -- but I would expect the monitor connector to be a smaller version of the same style. Amp makes them both in small and large versions for different current ranges.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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I never had one either, I repaired em.. I meant arcade games circa 1978, you know, 3ft square boards full of TTL to do "Pong"..
--.- Dave
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    Those had the connectors with the D-shaped pin fingers or cavities? I would have expected more like the Molex connectors with the single edge of 'V's like this for keying: __________     < o o o o |     < o o o o |     < o o o o |     < o o o o | -------- (I can't draw the bottom edge and the pins at the same time on this scale using ASCII graphics, so that edge is out of position. :-)
    Still nylon bodies, but closer to the period practice, I think. (Granted, I don't know how old some of the things which I have seen with the 'D' finger connectors really were, especially since I picked up a cluster of those with cut-off wires and crimped pins still in them from a hamfest. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

Hi Don, your description seemed fine until I measured some resistances, now I'm confused; I only had a continuity tester before. The following url
http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m266/lemel_man/Hitachi2.gif shows the plug rotated 90 degrees as suggested, but with the measured resistances between the terminals. Strangely, there is around 10 ohm resistance between *any* 2 of the central 3 terminals. The other 3 connections all measure at 5 ohms. I don't see how it can be 10 ohms between any two of the central 3, unless there is a common resistance somewhere.
--
Regards, Gary Wooding
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    [ ... ]

    Aha! Here is where it was (in usenet), instead of in e-mail like the other copies which I got this morning and already answered. I was away a good part of yesterday, and didn't get deep enough into usenet reading to find your question here.
    And -- my first try at answering fell afoul of your address munging, as I did not expect it in a direct e-mail.

    The three central terminals go to the "Winding set 2" windings, and from each you are measuring the resistance from the connector pin, through one winding, through the common wire to the right of the three windings, and back through another winding to the other connector pin. No matter which pair of pins you pick, you are measuring two of the three windings in series, so of course they will measure twice what any of the individual windings from "Winding Set 1" measures where you can get at both ends of a single winding.
    BTW -- the motor (IIRC the wattage rating) would be an excellent match for the tiny VFD and my Taig lathe. After I send this, I will go back to the start of the thread to verify my memory of the wattage.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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I'm resending this 'cos the first one seems to have been lost...
DoN. Nichols wrote: > ...snip > Actually -- you determined which wires are connected to common > windings. Typically, a dual voltage motor will be set up like this > (view with a fixed pitch font to things will line up properly): > > Winding set 1 Winding set 2 > > (A)-UUUUUUUUU-(B) (C)-UUUUUUUU--+ phase 1 > | > (D)-UUUUUUUUU-(E) (F)-UUUUUUUU--+ phase 2 > | > (G)-UUUUUUUUU-(H) (I)-UUUUUUUU--+ phase 3 > > Note that the letters which I have used here are for convenience > in describing things, and bear little or no relationship to whatever > markings the manufacturer probably used. > > All of the right-hand ends of winding 2 are connected together, > and are not brought out from the motor. > > For the lower voltage, the right-hand ends of winding 1 are also > connected together and otherwise ignored. The left hand end of the two > windings on each phase are connected together and to the outside power, > thus effectively connecting the two windings in parallel. > > However -- for the higher voltage, the right-hand end of winding > 1 of each phase is connected to the left-hand end of winding 2, and the > incoming power is connected to the left-hand end of winding 1. > > So -- for our purposes, it looks like my terminals A, D, and G > are what they call U1 V1 and W1, and what I called B, E, and H they > called Z1, X1, and Y1 -- the other end of the first set of windings. > > U2, V2, and W2 are the left-hand end of the second set of > windings, C, F, and I, and are what you measure as "connected together". > So -- those are the middle three pins with no flats on any of them. > > Your motor is not connected for either voltage *yet*. That is > determined by what is on the mating connector (which you will probably > want to get from someplace like Mouser or DigiKey -- unless you have a > good electronics store locally where you can walk in and try to find a > mating connector. > > Try rotating your connector image from where you traced the > conductivity 90 degrees clockwise, so the two pins with flats are on the > bottom, and I think that will make it match up with the drawings on the > motor, which are certainly set up to match the motor's connector > pattern.
Hi Don, your description seemed fine until I measured some resistances, now I'm confused; I only had a continuity tester before. The following url
http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m266/lemel_man/Hitachi2.gif shows the plug rotated 90 degrees as suggested, but with the measured resistances between the terminals. Strangely, there is around 10 ohm resistance between *any* 2 of the central 3 terminals. The other 3 connections all measure at 5 ohms. I don't see how it can be 10 ohms between any two of the central 3, unless there is a common resistance somewhere.
--
Regards, Gary Wooding
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I'm resending this 'cos the first one seems to have been lost...
DoN. Nichols wrote: > ...snip > Actually -- you determined which wires are connected to common > windings. Typically, a dual voltage motor will be set up like this > (view with a fixed pitch font to things will line up properly): > > Winding set 1 Winding set 2 > > (A)-UUUUUUUUU-(B) (C)-UUUUUUUU--+ phase 1 > | > (D)-UUUUUUUUU-(E) (F)-UUUUUUUU--+ phase 2 > | > (G)-UUUUUUUUU-(H) (I)-UUUUUUUU--+ phase 3 > > Note that the letters which I have used here are for convenience > in describing things, and bear little or no relationship to whatever > markings the manufacturer probably used. > > All of the right-hand ends of winding 2 are connected together, > and are not brought out from the motor. > > For the lower voltage, the right-hand ends of winding 1 are also > connected together and otherwise ignored. The left hand end of the two > windings on each phase are connected together and to the outside power, > thus effectively connecting the two windings in parallel. > > However -- for the higher voltage, the right-hand end of winding > 1 of each phase is connected to the left-hand end of winding 2, and the > incoming power is connected to the left-hand end of winding 1. > > So -- for our purposes, it looks like my terminals A, D, and G > are what they call U1 V1 and W1, and what I called B, E, and H they > called Z1, X1, and Y1 -- the other end of the first set of windings. > > U2, V2, and W2 are the left-hand end of the second set of > windings, C, F, and I, and are what you measure as "connected together". > So -- those are the middle three pins with no flats on any of them. > > Your motor is not connected for either voltage *yet*. That is > determined by what is on the mating connector (which you will probably > want to get from someplace like Mouser or DigiKey -- unless you have a > good electronics store locally where you can walk in and try to find a > mating connector. > > Try rotating your connector image from where you traced the > conductivity 90 degrees clockwise, so the two pins with flats are on the > bottom, and I think that will make it match up with the drawings on the > motor, which are certainly set up to match the motor's connector > pattern.
Hi Don, your description seemed fine until I measured some resistances, now I'm confused; I only had a continuity tester before. The following url
http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m266/lemel_man/Hitachi2.gif shows the plug rotated 90 degrees as suggested, but with the measured resistances between the terminals. Strangely, there is around 10 ohm resistance between *any* 2 of the central 3 terminals. The other 3 connections all measure at 5 ohms. I don't see how it can be 10 ohms between any two of the central 3, unless there is a common resistance somewhere.
--
Regards, Gary Wooding
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Is there such a thing as a 3-phase 100 volt motor? I've never heard of such a thing.
Gary
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snipped-for-privacy@panamsat.com wrote:

Japan is 100V 200V. Back in 1977 or so when I was last there, half of country was 50hz and the other 60hz.
Wes
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Yes, 100/120VAC 3-phase motors do exist. I was given a 120VAC 3-phase control module (several years ago) that was manufactured by A.O. Smith.
When I contacted them about obtaining a wiring diagram and specifications, they replied that the obsolete control was made for Vitamaster for use in treadmills, and that they could not provide any information.
There were some new 120VAC 3-phase motors availble at the time from a surplus dealer, Mendelson in Ohio, IIRC.
When I asked about the motors here in RCM at the time, someone mentioned that the 120VAC 3-phase motors were used for elevator door operators.
The A.O. Smith Co has a lot of downloadable PDF motor info at their website.
WB metalworking projects http://www.kwagmire.com/metal_proj.html ...........
wrote:

--
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You don't need a plug. Identify the motor wires and cut off the plug. Spice the 9 wires plus your feeder cable wires according to the connection diagram with good quality compression sleeves and insulate then with heat shrink tubing or Scotch 33 tape. If you want the ability to change voltages in the future, use compression lugs and short machine screws to make the connections. Insulate as needed.
Randy

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On Tue, 08 May 2007 18:50:06 +0100, lemel_man

Your>
http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m266/lemel_man/Hitachi.gif shows that you have a star connected dual voltage motor, not at present linked, for Low or High voltage operation.
"Dual Voltage Motor Connections" posted in the drop box shows the winding arrangement. I
The central three terminals showing continuity on your gif are terminals 7,8 & 9 of the drop box figure 3.6
One of your outer columns of terminals will be terminals 1,2 & 3, the other column will be terminals 5,6 & 7.
The correct linkage for High voltage is 4 to 7 5 to 8 6 to 9
Line input to 1,2 & 3
This is achieved by three horizontal links on your gif, from the centre three terminals to either the left or the righthand column of terminals.
Line input is into the remaining three terminals.
Because the starts and finishes of the windings are not identified we do not know whether the links should go to the right hand or to the left hand column - you have to experiment.
If you have chosen the correct column the motor will start instantly and run quietly and normally at rated speed.
If you've linked to the wrong column the motor will be very obviously distressed. It will run slowly or not at all, be very noisy and possibly blow a fuse. The motor will not be harmed by this but immediately disconnect because it will rapidly overheat.
Good Luck
Jim
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