ANCIENT MARINERS: Andean-Mexican seagoing trade

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Is there some form of convention or "law" that says I cannot suggest more than a SINGLE page as being "of interest"?
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Reply to
Seppo Renfors
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I don't know about it being a matter of convention or law, but it certainly seems to be a matter of fact. :-)
If you really meant to draw our attention to both pages, why didn't you do it the first time when you had a chance?
Eric Stevens
Reply to
Eric Stevens
If it is neither "convention or law" then it cannot be a "fact" either, you know.
Ahhhh.... but you see I have generously attributed a certain amount of mental agility and self motivation to people, considering the group IS a "sci.*" group presuming it to refer to "science" but without the "fiction" - though certainly sci-fi people have agile minds at least :-)
Reply to
Seppo Renfors
You mention a mob of people, then point to a time, now you tut-tut about your own actions attempting to somehow imply an "error" by me - why else point to a specific (but irrelevant) time? You see your "european contact" in this context doesn't state a time as the ARTICLE claims "european contact" before then. You don't specify what you referred to with your sloppy writing.
Are you suggesting none of the "cultures" you point to exist in Iowa?
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To say even revisionists agree with certain aspects - BTW, I can quote whomever I like and designate the value of them as I see then warrant.
.... or Beothuck? The term "red ochre" is about a people who's burial customs involved red ochre - that includes the Beothuck as well as the early Saami in Finland. It can be and is also called "Terminal Archaic" as a culture. I also tends to creep in on the "Woodland traditions" and can be referred to as that too. "Red Ochre" is a poorly chosen name as it is practically meaningless.
My understanding is that no burials were found at Riverside..... but I could be wrong:
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"Riverside Site (20- ME-1), Menominee County, Oshkosh, Wisconsin - 3 bodies were found at that site. The remains of one of the three individuals was cremated."
"The Riverside Site is a multi-component cemetery and habitation site. Intermittent occupation of the site spans a time period circa 1000 B.C.-A.D. 1850. The stylistic attributes of the copper objects are characteristic of the Red Ochre Culture, an archeologically defined culture within the Archaic Period, dated to 1000-400 B.C."
"The remains of two of the three individuals were removed from Feature A. Funerary objects date this burial feature to the 18th and 19th centuries. These objects, not in the possession of the Oshkosh Public Museum, consist of glass beads, a kettle brass bracelet, and a ceramic vessel."
So only one set of remains were of any age and that age is unknown. The primary identifier for "Red Ochre" culture hasn't been found apparently. Cremation was not a part of that culture either, IIRC cremation dates to the "Middle Woodland" culture. Again this isn't exactly the Keweenaw peninsular in Michigan either - if it is indeed the same "Riverside" we are dealing with.
What part of "I'm certain" didn't you understand?
You know, your life would really be empty and hollow without her as you can't stop thinking about her for long enough to write a few lines of text!
Psssttt.... they have found a HUGE piece (7 Yank ton) of that pure copper IN the lake itself, you know. Who is to say the ancients didn't dive for it as well?
This has already been discussed and searched for - it doesn't appear to exist - therefor it tends to point to an ASSUMPTION based on establishment dogma more than science as it requires the rejection of all refining processes pout of hand. BTW, you are one of those reporting on such things and there has been diddly-squat from you as well.
Listen, even with the intelligence of an oven mitten it is obvious you cannot c14 date a HOLE!
Reply to
Seppo Renfors

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