Angle iron

On Sat, 02 Jul 2011 15:30:59 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:


That's what comes of living "out in the sticks" where your suppliers are limitted, largely because their market is limitted.
Try the same in, say, Vancouver, or Calgary, Edmonton, Toronto, Kitchener, Montreal, etc, where many diverse industries use the materials in question.
Luckily you DID have a Home Hardware store - what they stock and sell out of the huge warehouse in the little town of St Jacobs Ontario is staggering!!!! And their prices are pretty fair, on the whole.
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On Jul 2, 11:00 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I bought angle and channel for several projects from a place "out in the sticks" that sells recycled pallet racks.
jsw
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On Jun 30, 6:48 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

No real hardware stores around? Virtually every one around here has a rack of rolled steel shapes in 3-6' lengths. Not as cheap as at a steel yard by the pound but very convenient on a Sun. afternoon. Ace is da place.
Stan
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On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 17:48:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That might be shaped hot, via bending rollers. (like metal roofing)

Given the same alloy, absolutely. Look at the crosssection. Extruded is much thicker at the root of the V.

Only in the Borgs or retail stores. In real metalmonger stores, it's cheapest in 20' lengths.
--
Just getting back after a farkin' virus ate my computer.
I'm still without any email or usenet archives. <sigh>
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wrote:

Angle iron (steel) is not extruded. The standard structural product is hot roll-formed. Cold-roll-formed angle has uniform thickness throughout, but the hot-rolled shapes are squeezed in their plastic state so they're thicker at the bend and thin out at the edges.
It is possible to extrude steel, and it's done, for more complex shapes. I've never heard of it being done for simple angles. It involves using molten glass as a lubricant and it's fairly involved, unlike aluminum extrusion.
Cold-formed steel is inherently stronger because of the effect of work-strengthening, but the shape of the hot-rolled product is superior in structural terms. Pound-for-pound, there is a tradeoff, but I think the hot-rolled comes out with a strength advantage due to shape, over the strength advantage of cold-rolled due to work-strengthening.
--
Ed Huntress



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