Any good use of carbide PCB drills

I am parting out a PCB drilling CNC machine. Inside of it, there is a good pile of a few lbs of carbide "PCB Drills". These are tiny drills
and perhaps end mills, with what looks like 1/8" shanks.
I wonder if there is any non-PCB use for them. I do realize that these carbide drills can only be used in CNC equipment, and I have a CNC milling machine. Trying to think of any good use cases but can't.
i
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On Wed, 19 Jul 2017 21:18:52 -0500, Ignoramus17939

Google "small hole drilling." In many of the links you'll find comments about the applications. There are many, from medical devices to aerospace to process screens and filters.
--
Ed Huntress

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Hobby dills tiny drill holes. Look into any Dremel box and you will have half a dozen. Martin
On 7/19/2017 9:45 PM, Ed Huntress wrote:

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On Friday, July 21, 2017 at 9:16:13 PM UTC-4, Martin Eastburn wrote:

Not really the same thing. The Dremel ones are HSS. Iggy's got solid carbide.
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I used to use those in the industry. I know what I'm talking about. The SS ones are drills. The ones with a plastic ring about the middle are the real things. One of the things I learned - many people turn in the drills of all sizes to be re-ground and calibrated tip to plastic.
When we took ours there, they were selling boxes of what we used for almost nothing. So we bought boxes and later got ours. All were sharp and he was trying to get his sharping price back out of them. So many companies died and left stuff everywhere. Motor places had fixes but no longer a customer. In the last 6 years in the south bay I worked for three companies. A big one got out of the business. Before that, I got my bonuses and VP and I found jobs before the crash. Then while at another small company a good friend and I created a product line that customers asked for the parts. Then a big fish bought us out and at that location once again started using carbide in very high speed spindle in CNC to drill prototype boards. Mill with 5 mill and drill the holes for connections and parts. Most of ours were surface mount. Grounds and power were on two planes and drilling connected them.
Martin
On 7/21/2017 8:49 PM, rangerssuck wrote:

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On 7/19/2017 8:45 PM, Ed Huntress wrote:

Oh I bet you go for the small ones, twinky.
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    I've used them, in a non-CNC Cameron Precision micro precision sensitive drill press for drilling out the web of a broken-off tap.
    They typically have split points, and are in a wide range of sizes. The colored collar around the shank helps you to pick the right size. (That, plus measuring to get close before you select with the color.) I don't know precisely what the color code is, but it is there.
    They, of course, are great for drilling small holes in PCB materials, like the green G10 glass-epoxy, and the blue glass epoxy for which I don't know the name. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

Diallyl Pthalate.
Jon
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Can these drills drill metal?
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    Yes. I said that I drilled out the web of a standard HSS tap, and was then able to pick out the teeth and re-tap the hole.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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    You've got enough of them so try it! Go for high RPM while you are about it. And particularly -- avoid side stress on them, as that is quite likely to snap the drill -- the same with the standard shanked solid carbide drills which I used for PCBs back when. The smaller the diameter, the easier it is to snap the drill with just a little side force.
    When drilling out the broken tap, the main trick was to get the workpiece solidly clamped to the table of the tiny drill press.
    Also -- check for runout in the drill chuck.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On Wed, 19 Jul 2017 21:18:52 -0500, Ignoramus17939

Crafters and woodcarvers love them. They fit well in Dremels an other small high speed flex-shaft handsets like Foredom. I got a bunch from Gunner about a decade ago (carbide or HSS?), but they seem to eat anything.
eBay sells new carbide 1/8" end mills for a buck, delivered.
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our Country will stand in Need of its experienced
Patriots to prevent its Ruin. -- Samuel Adams
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On 20-Jul-17 10:18 AM, Ignoramus17939 wrote:

Stick them on eBay in bags of 5/10/20.
Lots of electronics hobbiests use them, mainly in home brew CNC PCB drilling machines but also they can be used in a drill press manually if you're careful.
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"Trumble" wrote in message
On 20-Jul-17 10:18 AM, Ignoramus17939 wrote:

Stick them on eBay in bags of 5/10/20.
Lots of electronics hobbiests use them, mainly in home brew CNC PCB drilling machines but also they can be used in a drill press manually if you're careful. ___________
Works better with a sensitive drill chuck. Most drill presses have too much runout work well with micro drills. Some like the little high speed Proxxon are decent though.
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On 21-Jul-17 3:26 AM, Bob La Londe wrote:

Thanks, today I learned what a sensitive drill chuck was. I'd not heard of them before.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytvZekD5x6Q

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"Trumble" wrote in message

Thanks, today I learned what a sensitive drill chuck was. I'd not heard of them before.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytvZekD5x6Q

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Woo! Hoo! I was able to help somebody else learn something useful. Yippee!
So often I come on this group looking for help and knowledge. Its nice to be able to share some back once in a while.
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On Wed, 19 Jul 2017 21:18:52 -0500, Ignoramus17939

Depending on exactly what they are they work well in a small hand held demel grinder. I buy both the drills and what appear to be tiny end mills that are cheap, break easily, but can do small jobs on hard material. "Cheap" being the key word here :-)
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Ignoramus17939 wrote:

I buy them all the time, usually in 50 or 100 count assorted packs. I use them for doing repairs on various things as well as for hobby use.
Very handy in a Dremal tool or one of the small precision drill presses. Used a lot by hobbyists like RC, model train, ship, and model builders.
The big places use them once, then either scrap them or ship them to places to be sharpened and the good ones get returned, the out of spec go to the hobby market.
Have someone clean them and sort out the broken ones, then toss the rest on Ebay in various lot sizes, for shipping it is handy to stick them into a styrofoam block with a second one over the tips so they don't get broken.
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    And what makes them out of spec is the length of the shaft plus bit. This is because the PCB drilling machines are CNC, and have a fairly limited Z-axis movement.

    Agreed.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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They work reasonably well on a milling machine with this type of manual-feed adapter: https://www.ebay.com/i/122443451260?chn=ps&dispItem=1
-jsw
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