Anyone ever rebuild a 760 pellet gun?

I know its not a real gun but it helps keep the pests out of the bird feeder, I have a Crossman 760 from when I was just a little kid I am now
over 40 and it just doesn't have power (for a pellet gun) I went to walmart to buy a new one but they are just a plastic POS with a metal barrol. I like the heavy solid feel my old all metal and wood 760 has but its a real dud these days. Can these things be brought back to live or is it just a piece of my past.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hang it up and admire it. Trying to rebuild it is like trying to restore a 55 year old woman to her former 19 year old glory. All the stuff is there, you just can't get it back in the original configuration due to gravity, rust, use, overuse, wear, tear, and drama.
Go buy a top of the line pellet gun at somewhere besides Walmart. Walmart doesn't have top of the line pellet guns because no one will pay $500 for one. They are available, they are just $500 now.
HTH
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a Gamo 1000 pellet gun, it cost me about 200 dollars (IIRC), it is a perfect tack driver. An unbelievably accurate air rifle.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What has your reply got to do with the post?????
--

Clif

"Ignoramus12615" <ignoramus12615@NOSPAM.12615.invalid> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What has your top posted drivel got to do with anything?
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Top posting isn't the custom here, Cliff. Not saying it's wrong, but it isn't the custom in this NG and it seems to annoy some readers.
Ig's reply is en pointe because it cites an example of a modern air rifle considerably more performant than a Crossman that is available for considerably less than $500.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 12 Apr 2006 19:28:36 -0700, "Steve B"

Match-grade air rifles are that pricey, but an air rifle having very acceptable performance far superior to the rifles of yesteryear can be had for about $200. Ig mentioned his Gamo. They make good air rifles, definitely a cut or three above Crossman. I selected the RWS Diana model 34 as "best value in good-enough air rifle" when I was shopping two or three years ago. It's a one-pump break-barrel in .22 that is nearly as accurate as my good old had-it-50-years bolt-action clip-fed .22 rimfire carbine at ranges of 150 feet or less. At one-pump muzzle velocity of about 800 fps in .22 it definitely has ample power to drop varmints at ranges up to 150 feet. I chose .22 because it's accurate out to the ranges I need for garden defense, is in the dirt shortly thereafter -- gotta think about what's behind the target too ya know. I use it to zap garden-eatin' rabbits, with a low-power inexpensive Tasco scope that is designed to cope with the unique push-pull recoil profile of modern spring-powered air rifles. The Tasco is no Unertl but it's really quite decent for a "consumer grade" scope, absolutely sufficient for my purpose. Optics are as sharp as necessary, light-gathering power is sufficient to use until after civil twilight, it was easy to zero in and it has stayed that way over a couple of years of occasional use.
I don't need magnification, but having sight picture focussed at infinity is a great help for my older eyes. With scope or iron sights, depending on your eyeballs, if your bird feeder is 100 ft or less distant you should be able to consistently drop squirrels with head shots. Those are best if any kids might see you doing it. The squirrel just drops like a rock, no flopping or suffering. My neighbor kids (and their gentle parents) thought it "right" when I shot rabbits that ate the pretty flowers they enjoyed. Little girls love to pick flowers, big girls do too. They'd even call me when they saw a rabbit in Mary's garden out their back window. "Don, grab your rifle, there's a rabbit in Mary's garden, not far from the Monet arch!" They would not have been so sanguine about witnessing the miserable struggles of an obviously-frantic wounded critter I'd then have to go dispatch with a vertical shovel-stroke.
Rabbits shot with the Model 34 jump about 6" straight up and come back down stone dead with hardly a quiver: squeeze off one round, set rifle down and grab a shovel to aid completion of nature's cycle as steward of the land: bad rabbit eats flowers, pow, dead rabbit feeds new flowers. We all know PhD's for whom that's a bit deep, but it makes perfect sense to the little girls I've known and most of the big girls as well. The key is to effect a clean kill every time.
When I first got the model 34 a couple of years ago, rabbit 1 was at the far end of the garden about 150 feet. I held a bit high like I always had with my old Benjamin after 10 pumps, squeezed one off. Missed -- no suprise -- but then, thru the scope, I saw a hole in a gladiolus leaf that was dead center in the sight picture I recalled from when the rifle had popped. Hello! Rabbit1 was still there, motionless, apparently hadn't heard or been worried about the tic in the leaf just behind it from the subsonic pellet. Cool! Broke barrel to pump and cock, reloaded, held right on Bre'r Rabbit, squeezed. Up 6, down dead, rabbit1 was flowerfood waiting to be planted which was accomplished forthwith.
Then Bre'r Owl moved into the neighborhood, so I don't get to shoot hardly any rabbits anymore. Oh well, whatever works.
A friend of mine says he has shot maurauding raccoons with his model 34 at 75 feet. Raccoons are tough critters. He'd have to have shot Bre'r Coon right thru they eye to drop him with an air rifle, probably what he did. He is competent with rifle and shotgun.
The Model 34 is a bit heavy for enjoyable carrying for long periods as in field plinking, but that weight definitely aids accuracy for occasional varmint-dropping or target shooting. It's not as heavy as a match .22 rimfire but noticably heavier than a .22 rimfire carbine or an older no-plastic Crossman.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've had mine for almost 40 years. It's been a while since I've taken it apart. As I recall there's a few O rings to replace. I think I still have the exploded view with part numbers around somewhere. If I find it I'll let you know.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It doesn't seem like anyone is interested. I am. I have a thrice-rebuilt 760 myself.
There's no magic to it. A handful of 0-rings and a couple of smears of grease is about all it takes to get it back to as-new performance. Mine needed the pin re-done on the pump piston, too, but that was solved by sleeving the hole with a bronze bushing.
The 760 isn't a 'real' air gun by today's standards, but it was a dandy little boy-toy, and they last almost forever.
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Good post Lloyd, thanks for the information.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I did fail to mention that there are two little "cup" type seals in there. I got them literally off the shelf from a local guy that rebuilds airguns.
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wayne mak wrote:

Crosman has a list of service centers on their Web site <http://www.crosman.com . They also list the order numbers for the parts diagrams--the design has gone through some changes so make sure you get the right one.
Odds are that it just needs some new seals.
Before you put money into fixing it though, you might want to take a look at the compasseco <http://www.compasseco.com , beeman <http://www.beeman.com , and Cobra <http://www.airgunsbbguns.com sites and see what's available--air rifle technology has made massive strides in the past 40 years.
You can get into an older design barrel-cocking El Gamo for about the same price as one of the toys from Wal-Mart, or if you've reached a point in life where you can afford an expensive toy you might want to look into "last year's model" target guns from Feinwerkbau and Anschutz (since air rifle became an Olympic event it has become a _very_ competitive market).
Don't be too put off by plastic stocks by the way--they work fine and most military rifles these days are so equipped because they're lighter, stronger, require less maintenance, and are cheaper than wood. Of course the plastic the military uses is likely a bit different from that that you find on a cheap airgun.
Many years ago I indulged myself in a Feinwerkbau 300S, which is quite a remarkable piece of hardware. Quite accurate enough to pick wasps off a nest.
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wayne mak wrote:

Dead easy to do, and there are a dozen or so guys out there that make a living selling parts just for the old airguns.
The old wood and metal crosmans are pretty sweet bits of kit, for what the were.
Most of the seals are just common O rings, with a couple odd bits that you might have to deal with a parts supplier for. Those parts would be the exaust seal, the seal in the air chamber, and the pump cup seal.
A google search for Crosman airgun parts will find many souces, or you can try the various links from http://www.airguns.net/classifieds/classifieds.html as a good start.
Chances are pretty good that you can find someone to sell you a complete kit of parts for about $20, maybe less.
Crosman will sell you the parts as well, though they tend to want to swap out the old design parts(metal ones) for the new design parts (plastic) sometimes. They generally want you too order by part number. Most of the aftermarket guys have their stuff arranged such that they can deal with the various changes made in production, and have kits made up as a package.
www.crosman.com has downloadable schematics with part numbers. You will have to download quite a few of them and examine them fairly carefully to determine wich one is correct for the gun you have, wish is fairly early production, and somewhat desireable to the Crosman collectors/shooters.
Cheers Trevor Jones (with about 80 pounds of various aiguns, mostly Crosman)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wayne mak wrote:

Wayne Parallel paths here. I've had a Cometa pelletgun since I was about 9 (Christmas present). Rediscovered it recently and am about to start rebuilding it. In the meantime, I stopped by the local Sports Authority store and they had a Benjamin Legacy 1000X on clearance for $105. 100 fps, scope,all American-made, wood stock, not much plastic. Full-size gun with lots of punch. I've enjoyed it a lot in the month I've had it, sitting on the deck and making holes in tin cans and paper targets. No rabbits around here, and the wife won't let me shoot the squirrels, but crows and starlings are fair game. And if that noisy min-pin behind me wanders into my yard again .... j/k
Rebuild your Crossman. Some of the links others offered will give you some ideas on tuning it, much of which lends itself to lathe work. Tuning results in higher velocity and lower recoil. Enjoy the project, as I am looking forward to mine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have bought parts from him last year, I think that it was.
He was undergoing cancer treatments at the time.
I know that Crosman or Daisy sold him all the old series obosolete parts that they had. They are carrying parts for the current models only.
I just can not remember which company that it was at the moment.
He did have some used parts for some models.
Hope that this helps you some.
Harvey
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 12 Apr 2006 19:11:28 -0400, "wayne mak"

There is an air rifle store in south Minneapolis, on Hiawatha or Minnehaha, that has parts for old air rifles. I rebuilt my 55 year old Benjamin, works great now. My son has it
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wayne mak wrote:

Wayne,
Sounds like you have the original model with the wood stock, gold bolt, and non-grooved receiver. It's a real classic - keep it forever. I bought mine back in the late 1960s for about $15, from Sears. Counted for a lot of squirrels and blackbirds in it's time.
Yes, they are rebuildable. Look up "Bryan and Sons", I believe they will sell you the parts or do the rebuild for you. They specialize in old Crosman guns.
Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
funkychateau wrote:

Sorry, that should have been "Bryan and Associates". The url is: http://www.bryanandac.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
funkychateau wrote:

Thirty yards away, at the top of an old cottonwood, he didn't flinch or jerk, didn't raise his wings, he didn't even slump so much as teeter off the branch and rush down. Right in the eye.
I still think about that crow and feel bad, and about that 760--and feel good.
er
--
email not valid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try the Benjamin 22 cal. air rifles... Not real expensive and plenty acurate for keeping stuff out of bird feeders...
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.