Anyone seen a lamp like this before?

Hi all,
Just got back from spending a few days on holiday in Berlin. I stayed at
a cheap-but-nice place which used to be a telephone factory (take a look
at
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if you're thinking of going to Berlin - you guys
would probably like the place). Anyway I digress a little, but the place
was fitted out using many Cold War era lamps, desks and fixtures which I
thought looked really cool.
Then one night I went for a walk and noticed a huge complex of derelict
buildings, probably 50 acres or so. It turned out to be an old East
German railway rolling stock maintenance depot. When the wall came down
they had two depots within a couple of miles of each other, so they
closed one, removed all the gear and abandoned it. Nowadays it has been
pretty comprehensively trashed and, apart from the odd sign warning of
"unfallgefahr", you can wander around the place pretty freely. Some
squatters have even set up an nightclub on the site. Given my love of
old junk and also a fascination for derelict buildings, I couldn't
resist a look. Sadly I didn't have a camera with me, but brought back a
couple of things from among the piles of waste on the site:
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Obviously there are a pair of Bourdon pressure gauges (apparently these
look pretty weird under an x-ray scanner!) and one of those Cold War era
lamps I was talking about. Unfortunately the lamp glass is broken, but I
thought I'd pick it up anyway and try to find a replacement. It looks
like the glass has been sprayed red on the inside, probably so that it
could be used as some kind of signalling lamp. Has anyone seen a lamp
like this before? It's marked with a logo made from the letters "EOW"
and also carries the letters "Ex" and "Sch", both inside circles. The
whole thing is very heavy and the cage isn't made from wire, it's round
bar! I also need a weird triangular spanner to open the case. That blast
cabinet I was talking to Harold about would be useful too! Here are a
few more pictures:
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Anyone got any thoughts about where to find a new glass dome, or how to
make one? Interesting challenge...
Sorry for the long post!
Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
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I have seen them in the USSR. They used to use these in construction sites for some purposes, I forgot which. Like marking cranes etc.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus18077
Mate of mine runs
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and has lights of this style occasionally, also glass that might fit. Other than that I do some glassblowing and know a couple of people who could blow one. Where about in the world are you.
Christ> Hi all,
Reply to
David Billington
Hi David,
Thanks for the suggestions. I'm in Shropshire, England. I had a look at the Source Antiques site but can't see any lights of this design on there at the moment, but there is some pretty nice other stuff. Maybe I should e-mail him a picture of the lamp and see if he can get the glass? I'm not bothered about the glass being red as I want to use the lamp for ordinary lighting.
The globe is essentially a cylinder with a hemisphere on the end and about 1/4" thick. I think it probably has a lip on the upper end but I can't tell for sure as I haven't been able to disassemble the lamp yet. Do you think it would be straightforward enough to blow?
Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
"cold war era"? Huh! It's an old lamp from the former DDR. That's it. Nothing military-related.
Not too uncommon. The only difference is the cast housing. But ...
It means "Explosion" = explosion and "Schutz" = protection. "Ex"-stuff is used mostly in mines and means that it won't spark when switched on/off. I guess that the "Sch" means here, that it is water tight (spray water). I would say that they used it because of it's rudgedized design.
HTH, Nick
Reply to
Nick Müller
Do you mean beyond the fact that you see lamps with that general design anwhere that a heavy-duty, rugged lamp is needed? Caged lamps light that are everywhere; we have at least four of them lighting up our barn -- the cage keeps the glass from shattering all over the horses if they start to act up.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
I thought you were UK based. Might be best to email a photo to Rod Donaldson at Source with some dimensions, he's on broadband. He may have something stashed away. Not everything is on the site.
Blowing it should not be difficult, if it requires a flange at the top then it will most likely have to have a punty mark at the bottom but this can be ground out and polished. If no flange, just straight sided, then the piece could be cut from the blown item leaving what you want without requiring a punty.
The punty is the small piece of glass used to hold the glass to another iron when the piece is transfered from the blowing iron.
Christ> David Bill>
Reply to
David Billington
When I said "Cold War era" I just meant something that was made in Eastern Europe sometime between 1960 and 1980. I didn't mean anything military-related. Maybe I'm using the phrase incorrectly, but I'm not a military historian.
That's interesting to know the meaning of the "Ex" and "Sch" marks. I read online that those triangular-headed bolts are often used on equipment designed for explosive environments, but so far I can't find anywhere that sells the right spanner (M6 I think it is). Might see if I can get one of those electricity meter box keys. Looking closely it also says "geprueft" between the "Ex" and "Sch" marks. Does that roughly mean "proven" or "tested" in translation?
Thanks for the information,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
No, I meant this exact lamp. I've seen a fair number of similar ones too, but never one as heavy and solid as this. This is probably the weight of a brick!
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Thanks for the information. I need to get a triangular spanner before I can disassemble the lamp, then I'll take some photos and e-mail the dimensions to Rod. If he hasn't got anything I might get back to you about the glass blowing.
Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
We use lamps of almost exactly that construction in the pyro trade for lighting work areas where explosive powders are present.
According to NFPA, there's nothing that actually qualifies as "explosion proof", but there are dustproof lamp enclosures that qualify for use in explosive dust environments. A different type is required for explosive gasses.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
That's OK. "cold war" for me means something different. YMMV.
It's often used for "restricted" access. For example the FD uses some triangular locks on doors, cabinets, poles etc.
it means tested in the sense of approved.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Müller
sci.engr.lighting
Reply to
Michael Shaffer
I have seen lamps that looked like that on Navy ships. They were used as "night lights" and the red color was so as to not destroy your night vision. You could take a break from watch duty and return and still have the night vision.
Of course anything for the Navy was sturdy. Try marine suppliers for replacements.
Bill k7NOM
Reply to
Bill Janssen
Naval lamps are like that. Right and left - :-) Christmas colors.
I have a Japanese lamp that is very close in design.
Martin
Reply to
lionslair at consolidated dot
It looks like the glass has been sprayed red on the
The Ex means that it is approved for use in an explosive atmosphere. I don't recognise the other letters Tom
Reply to
Tom Miller
Is the base size a standard medium thread base or is it larger, as in a mogul base?
"lionslair at consolidated dot net"
> Ignoramus18077 wrote: > >> >> >>>
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>> >>>Obviously there are a pair of Bourdon pressure gauges (apparently these >>>look pretty weird under an x-ray scanner!) and one of those Cold War era >>>lamps I was talking about. Unfortunately the lamp glass is broken, but I >>>thought I'd pick it up anyway and try to find a replacement. It looks >>>like the glass has been sprayed red on the inside, probably so that it >>>could be used as some kind of signalling lamp. Has anyone seen a lamp >>>like this before? >> >> >> I have seen them in the USSR. They used to use these in construction >> sites for some purposes, I forgot which. Like marking cranes etc. >> >> i >> > Naval lamps are like that. Right and left - :-) Christmas colors. > > I have a Japanese lamp that is very close in design. > > Martin > > -- > Martin Eastburn > @ home at Lion's Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net > NRA LOH, NRA Life > NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder > >
Reply to
Grady
Ut is NOT a running light as they have light baffle's so that they can be seen at specified angles.
Bill k7NOM
Reply to
Bill Janssen
Do you mean the base of the bulb? I can't be certain yet, because I haven't been able to extract the remains of the bulb, but from below it looks like a standard Edison screw fitting.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
More than like it is just a standard incandescent lamp. Very doubtful that it was any type of HID lighting. The portion of the filament assembly that is left looks like a common incandescent. Earlier post regarding xp for explosion proof could very likely be correct, possibly class 2 device. This is a typical design today for such fixtures from Crouse Hinds, Appleton, OZ Gedney and others.
Reply to
Grady

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