B&S Engine starts but won't run

Briggs & Stratton one cylinder OHV Model 185432 Simpson Pressure Washer
Not used for 9 years. Starts on first pull and runs as long as I keep spraying gas on the air filter.
Cleaned carburetor (blew with compressed air). Bowl was clean, carb seems spotless. Does not seem to be anything to take apart on this one-piece casting except for what seems to be an air jet accessible from the top.
Any ideas on what might be going on? Carb bowl always full. Needle float valve seems to be in very good condition.
Thanks for any and all suggestions.
Ivan Vegvary
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On Sun, 28 Aug 2016 16:03:49 -0700 (PDT), Ivan Vegvary

The main jet in the bottom of the carb is plugged. 99.99%
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yep. The gas plugs the holes in the fuel pick up tube and the main jet.
--
Steve W.

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On Sun, 28 Aug 2016 19:46:06 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

+1. Most people don't run the engine out of fuel before storage, and the old fuel varnishes up the jets as it dries.
Chances are good that the pump didn't get a douche of pump protectant way back when, either (Most people forget that.) so the chances of a failed pump are pretty high.
--
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On 8/28/2016 7:03 PM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

My first thought is that it is gummed-up with varnish and other gasoline products. There is a product called "Gumout" carb ceaner that has worked well for me many times. https://gumout.com/maintenance-aerosols/carburetor-choke-cleaner/
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If there's gas in the bowl and it's not reaching the intake something is plugged, whether you can see it or not.
If no better ideas come up I'd try dunking the casting (disassembled as far as it'll go) in a pot of Pine-Sol on a hotplate outdoors. It's a fairly aggressive treatment, if you have access to an ultrasonic cleaner that would be a good, cautious first step. Boiling Pine-Sol etches zinc rather harshly, removing galvanizing from steel and leaving brass jets pink. It'll likely do the same to zinc-based die casting alloys. A little etch might be ok, a lot is apt to be destructive.
I used this method on carbs for a Suzuki SV650S and it cured a rough slow running problem very neatly, at the cost of removing all the surface zinc on both jets and brackets.
hth,
bob prohaska
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wrote:

Get a 1 or 5 gal bucket ($25-$200) of Berryman's Carb Dip. Strip and dip the carbs. Gumout works for gooey, but doesn't work at all for hardened deposits. Ditto my fave carb cleaner, Berryman's B-12 Chemtool. It's great, but not good enough for hardened crap. Hmm, looking at the SDS on both, I think the Greenies killed CarbDip. Maybe the Chemtool is the better of the two now, and Gumout tried to copy Chemtool. https://www.berrymanproducts.com/assets/CD-A-Int-0996-SDS-R01.pdf https://www.berrymanproducts.com/assets/1AA-1-aerosol-0110-0113-0117-0120-SDS-R01.pdf http://schmeling.com/msds/gumout_carburator_cleaner.pdf
In any case, for you, Gunner, you'll likely have to import anything which will actually work. The R O Kalifornia bans the good stuff.
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THANK YOU everybody. Took off carb one more time thinking that the bowl fastener probably functions also as a gas inlet. (I've seen that before ) Wrong! But I found a tiny,tiny jet perpendicular to the gas flow that was plugged. A sewing needle and a hammer unclogged it, and the machine purrs rather nicely Thank you for pointing me to 'supply' problem. Ivan Vegvary
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On Sun, 28 Aug 2016 19:54:03 -0700, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

It's good to see the group getting on topic every once in a while.
There's an amazing amount of internal combustion engine diagnosis that you can do if you just remember that fire needs fuel, air, and heat to burn, and that an internal combustion engine without fire is just an air pump.
Air needs to get in, fuel needs to get in, the air & fuel need to be heated up to ignition temperature, it has to be able to work on the piston, and then it has to be expelled before the cycle repeats. If one of those is missing, it ain't gonna work.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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I can often figure out the problem by holding my hand in the exhaust stream for a moment and then sniffing it. To calibrate your nose, try that for a rich mixture with the choke out, a normal mixture when warmed up and a lean one when running the carb dry.
--jsw
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On 8/30/2016 5:00 PM, Tim Wescott wrote:

it has to have spark (at the right time!),
it has to be able to work on the

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On Tue, 30 Aug 2016 16:00:48 -0500, Tim Wescott

Right. Fuel, air, and a properly timed spark.
--
While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy
is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our
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On Tue, 30 Aug 2016 19:55:23 -0700, Larry Jaques wrote:

Or air, enough compression, and a properly timed spritz of fuel (if it's a diesel).
--
Tim Wescott
Control systems, embedded software and circuit design
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On Tue, 30 Aug 2016 19:55:23 -0700, Larry Jaques

Not quite correct. You need fuel and air, comprssion and properly timed spark
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On Wed, 31 Aug 2016 20:45:17 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Verily.
--
While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy
is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our
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On Wed, 31 Aug 2016 22:16:02 -0700, Larry Jaques wrote:

Here: no compression, no spark, working internal combustion engine: <
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zs56Cii3kdg

--
Tim Wescott
Control systems, embedded software and circuit design
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wrote:

An engineer at Segway had a model engine he'd built that drew in and condensed the hot gases from an external flame to operate the piston. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuum_engine
--jsw
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On Thu, 01 Sep 2016 14:27:52 -0400, Jim Wilkins wrote:

It looks like a really inefficient reinvention of the Newton steam engine.
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Tim Wescott
Control systems, embedded software and circuit design
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wrote:

Newcomen. Yes, it's a hot-gas version of a similar idea from Newcomen, the earliest practical steam engines.
A lot of the early engines were vacuum engines -- the earliest hot-air Stirlings and steam Newomen engines were vacuum types.
It was a while before they could use pressure beyond atmospheric without blowing their heads off. d8-)
--
Ed Huntress

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wrote:

The 1698 steam pump of Thomas Savery used both vacuum to pull water into its chamber and pressure to force it up out of the mine, since it had to be placed within about 25 feet of the water table.
http://www.egr.msu.edu/~lira/supp/steam/savery.htm "The boiler would have needed to hold 35 psig pressure to raise water 80 feet- similar to the pressure in an automobile tire. It is likely that this use of such pressure was a reason that the Savery pump had a reputation for boiler explosions. Zealous operators undoubtedly increased the boiler pressure to pump water upwards further, and thus created some of the accidents by overpressurization."
The wrought iron of the time was forge-welded from small pieces and was riddled with questionable seams, like a Damascus shotgun barrel.
Steam engineers including Watt avoided pressure for the next 100 years, until metalworking advances of the Industrial Revolution finally permitted strong enough boiler construction. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Cort
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watt_steam_engine Despite the tea kettle tale, "James Watt avoided the use of high pressure steam because of safety concerns."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Trevithick https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Evans " Later in life Evans turned his attention to steam power, and built the first high-pressure steam engine in the United States in 1801, developing his design independently of Richard Trevithick, who built the first in the world a year earlier."
--jsw
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