Gradual failure of gas grill regulator

I have a Weber Genesis Silver propane grill that?s about 15 years old. It?s kept outside, but with a fabric cover when not in use.
Over the last year or two, it started running hotter and hotter, building gradual, slowly enough that I was just pulled along. Things would come out overcooked, and I would adjust the time and flame setting to compensate. It recently got to the point that turning flame control knobs had little effect - it was always way hotter than set. At which point I realized that something had to be wrong.
Well, grills are pretty simple:
Propane? Tank 3/4 full, and running out doesn?t usually cause it to run hot anyway.
Flame height valves? All three do the same thing, they are made of solid brass, and they all feel the same, and feel OK. Unlikely.
Burners? Nah.
Hmm. Only the gas pressure regulator is left, and this gradual rise in temperature despite the valve settings could be explained if the output pressure were to rise gradually as the regulator wore out.
Well, I had bought a new regulator a few years ago while I was having spider-mite problems, and that regulator had been in inventory ever since. Installed the new regulator.
Bingo! Temperatures returned to normal, flame controls now control the flame height, and my cooking improved overnight.
The moral of the story is that regulators can wear out, giving trouble long before they just fail. I?m guessing that regulators should be replaced at ten years.
Joe Gwinn
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I had a similar problem, the flame would start out very small but increase as the grill heated. Changed the regulator and everything became fine.
The old one was full of crud and oxidation.
i
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On Sep 1, 2016, Ignoramus27222 wrote

I didn?t notice an increase while heating, but I would start the grill and come back in 10 to 15 minutes, so I would not have necessarily seen any increase. But accumulation of crud and oxidation is certainly plausible.
I will cut the regulator apart and inspect the innards.
Joe Gwinn
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On Sep 2, 2016, Gunner Asch wrote

Could be. I?ll look.
Joe Gwinn
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On Thu, 01 Sep 2016 21:44:30 -0400, Joseph Gwinn




Fun story. I've never had that problem because my BBQs rust out before the regulator can go bad. They're just $25 tabletop models since I'm single, but they can handle a 5# teriyaki pork loin roast pretty easily, or 6 petite sirloins. I always buy large qtys, cook it all up, and freeze what I can't eat during a week in the fridge.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I'm afraid to ask, but why do you spend a week in the fridge?
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In January we do it to keep warm.
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On Sat, 3 Sep 2016 08:44:58 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

It keeps me out of the rain here.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Why? You're always wet, anyway. ;-)
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On Sat, 3 Sep 2016 13:45:14 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

All washed up, y'mean? I mean, I'm retar...um, retired.
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Larry Jaques wrote: >

Tell us something that we don't already know! ;-)
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

I might believe it, if you had said that it was to keep your snacks closer. ;-)
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Without even bringing this customized armless swivel recliner upright I just turned and grabbed a slice of honey ham from the fridge.
After our usual arctic January and February the temperature of a fridge is beach weather. As a kid I went swimming in the 40F North Atlantic.
--jsw
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Jim Wilkins wrote: >

The fridge is on the other end of the house, so I have to get up and walk there an back. It cuts down on snacking by 70% or more. I had a fridge in my room at several different places, when I was healthy. I go to bed hungry, quite often, to keep my blood sugar where it belongs.
I worked outside at -20 in a tee shirt and fatigue pants, after a winter that was rarely above -40. My metabolism was running wide open.
:)
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On Sun, 4 Sep 2016 15:41:56 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

70+ years ago we went swimming May 1st whether there was ice in the lake or not, just so long as the water was open at our swimming hole near the outlet.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote: >

That would burn some calories, as well. :)
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I went swimming in a partly frozen lake on a warm day in early May to see how far I could swim to save someone. The answer was not far at all, certainly not 50 yards if even 50 feet. My skin was too numb to really feel the cold but I also couldn't grab a rope or walk out easily. --jsw
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On Mon, 05 Sep 2016 00:00:54 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

I've worked here in a tee shirt at the freezing point. Once I warm up, I sweat if I have sleeves or jacket on. I've always needed the reverse of a vest. My torso is warm from the work, but my arms got cold. My main jacket for work was a simple, unlined windbreaker. When you just stand around, your metabolism drops and you need a real jacket, but if you work, your metabolism warms you up in a hurry. I think the average human body puts out 300w of heat on a regular basis, much more when working.

That's just nuckin' futs. It's as bad as running naked of the sauna and jumping into a snow bank. Silly Darwinist Northerners. "How many times can we do this before our hearts explode?"
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It's around 300 BTU. 341 BTU/hr = 100 W.
https://www.gohvacsales.com/static_docs/tech_tips/26_the_people_load.pdf
--jsw
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On Mon, 5 Sep 2016 07:23:35 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

88w, OK.

Thanks for the correction, as it had been quite awhile since I read that. Interesting link. Thanks, Hardi. From 260 sleeping to 2000 BTU/hr working/swimming is quite a range.
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