Regulator Gas Compatibility--H2 regulator for CO2?

I have salvaged a hydrogen regulator in good condition. I'd like to
use it to set up a home-brew kegging system on the cheap. What would
happen if I were to use this H2 regulator for carbon dioxide (I'd get
all the right fittings, of course)? Can any of y'all gas handling
experts help this novice out?
I'd assume the main differences between an H2 and a CO2 regulator are
in the soft materials used for seals/diaphragms, etc. Perhaps orifice
sizes are smaller, too, because of the lighter, less viscous gas.
What are the other differences I should know about before I attempt
this feat?
The regulator is a Uniweld RHT 8017, rated for 3000 psi input.
Many thanks,
Cam
Reply to
Cameron Lee
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I think you would not be happy with the results. H2 is stored in cylinders as a gas at a couple thousand PSI like Argon or Oxygen. CO2 liquifies at a few hundred psi at room temperature and is stored in the cylinder as a liquid. I believe the regulator design is rather different.
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
What are the differences in regulators for different gases? I'd assume they share the same basic design since they all control the static pressure of a gas. I know this kind of thing isn't generally done, but I wouldn't think the liquid In a CO2 tank would affect the regulator, since only gas touches the regulator.
I'm racking my brain, and here are the possible road blocks I've thought of:
- Perhaps the flow rate might be reduced since the reglator was designed for a light gas. - Perhaps I'll find it impossible to get a CGA-320 fitting that will screw into the regulator; they might be designed that way.
That's about it. If anyone can confirm or deny these or think of other reasons, I'd much appreciate it.
Cam
Reply to
Cameron Lee
Try the Scott Speciality gases site
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menu under Tech Assistance click on Tech & Safety Data. This will put you on a page with links to more information about cylinders, CGA valve outlets, regulators and conversion charts than you probably ever wanted to know. Scott, under "Cylinder Valve Outlets and Connections" lists all the connection data and says, "In some cases, alternate CGA connections may be used, and, upon a customer's request, will be supplied instead of the standards shown below" They can probably answer any question you have regarding possible compatiblity issues between single and dual stage regulators if they do exist.
Check out the conversion tables while you're there. Not everywhere you can find out how to change Millimicrons into Angstrom Units. ;-)
Hope this helps (and gets through this time, have no idea where last nights post went)
Mike H
Reply to
Mike H.
Cold gas - well below room temperature and at much lower pressure than (say) Argon. Seems to me different springs and orifice sizes would be used.
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
Seems I was wrong. Jusy got a Princess Auto flyer showing an Argon or CO2 regulator on their MIG stuff page.
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
Western Enterprises Cylinder adapter from CGA-320 CO2 cylinder to CGA-350 Hydrogen regulator is Western Enterprises part number 821. You could also change regulator inlet fitting to CGA-320 fitting.
You regulator could feeze up when used with CO2. More likly if it is cold, high flow rate, long periods of high flow. Some regulators when they feeze up from using CO2 damage damage regulator's diaphram .
Reply to
R. Duncan

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