Best way to bevel brass

I need to bevel some 16 gauge free machining brass sheet with a 45 degree edge. The finished cut needs to be half of the sheet's
thickness.
The pieces are 3 inches square and need to be beveled on 2 parallel edges. There could potentially be hundreds of these pieces.
Is this a job for a mill, a grinder, a hand file or something else?
Gary Rice
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snipped-for-privacy@panamsat.com wrote in

Mill...or router
--
Anthony

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snipped-for-privacy@panamsat.com wrote:

There are automated commercial bevelers that would work, but you could probaly build one eaily enough. They have a V-shaped trough the work slides in, and a horizontal cutter in the bottom. There's a height adjustment that sets the depth of the bevel. You fire it up & slide the work down the trough. It's sort of like a wood jointer, but with corners. I suspect a router with an end mill would work.
Doug White
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snipped-for-privacy@alum.mit.edu says...

I've seen these used for beveling the edges of engraved nametags. The only one I looked at closely used a cylindrical carbide burr as the cutter. It would be worth checking with engraving businesses to see if they could run the parts.
Then there's the mondo version for weld prep... <http://www.emachinetool.com/accessories/catalog/large.cfm ? OptionFamilyID&2>
Ned Simmons
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    --What he said; I suspect that a router would do fine. Just be *certain*, when working with small parts like this, that you make a custom insert for the router table that has the smallest possible opening, so you don't risk tipping one edge of the workpiece down a hole as this could cause it to go ballistic...
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Call it what you like, but a bevel joins two parallel sides. A chamfer joins 2 mating sides.
A bevel can't be half the thickness of your parts, but a chamfer could.
I wouldn't want to have to look at possibly hundreds of parts to do without a quick way to accurately set up 10+ pieces at a time to cut in one pass (at least one side of the fixtured parts in a single pass). Ideally, I'd try to plan for one side to be cut in one direction, and the opposite side to be cut on the way back (mill table). Then set more parts and repeat.
Anthony's suggestions are sound, a rotating cutter would go fast.
WB ............
snipped-for-privacy@panamsat.com wrote:

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On 13 Jul 2006 13:36:45 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@panamsat.com wrote:

A mill of course. Or a Beaver chamfer machine
Gunner
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