Can a hard bearing ball be welded to mild steel

The application is to make a turning handle for a vise, of a mild steel rod 9/16 in diameter, and two hard bearing balls 1" in
diameter. Obviously, this is not a critical weld and strength requirements are minimal. The most strain on it would be when it falls vertically through the vise screw and is stopped by the screw, the worst outcome is that it will hurt my foot.
So. Is there some way to weld it that would not crack and would hold up?
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On Oct 28, 7:03 pm, Ignoramus20172 <ignoramus20...@NOSPAM. 20172.invalid> wrote:

I think most any way to weld it would work. Also silver , brass , silicon bronze brazing.
Dan
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Ignoramus20172 wrote:

Sure, this should be easy! I'd TIG it, of course. Not exactly sure what to use as filler wire, I don't think it is critical. It might be good to grind any Chrome off the ball if plated, but an actual ball out of a bearing shouldn't be.
Jon
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On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 21:03:43 -0500, Ignoramus20172 wrote:

The welders at work do this all the time. 309SS stick and all works well.
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I have a set of ball bearings from 2.5 inches on down to 1/2 inch, TIG welded to 3/8 mild steel rods. I use them for dollys or anvils, straightening tubes, hammer forming sheet metal into curves, etc. Haven't broken one yet.
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Why don't you tap the balls and thread the rod? I guess you could anneal the balls first to make it easier.
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On Oct 28, 10:03 pm, Ignoramus20172 <ignoramus20...@NOSPAM. 20172.invalid> wrote:

Seems a waste to me when you can just heat and upset the ends of the 9/16" rod
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On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 21:03:43 -0500, Ignoramus20172

If the rod end is planar, I'd TIG it. Easy weld. If the rod end can be made concave on the lathe, cone would do, then I'd silver-braze it. The silver-brazed joint would be about invisible and have more than ample strength.
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Thank you Don.
I welded it with 410 stainless filler that I had, the choice of filler was made "because I had it". I posted a link to pictures separately.
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On Wed, 29 Oct 2008 00:20:28 -0500, Ignoramus20172

Isnt it amazing how much work gets done, even after the plans have been changed to reflect "whats on hand"?
Gunner
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On Wed, 29 Oct 2008 02:56:06 -0700, Gunner

all work is done with what is on hand when you think about it. :-)
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That's how i get things done. Very small shop and very far from a metal supplier. Boss says "make a few of these", so I draw it up. Then, i re-design it a few times to reflect materials available and tooling. Sometimes it takes longer to get ready to make it than actual machining time. If I absolutely have to have metal ordered it could be 2 weeks to 2 months before i see it.
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Hey People,
Concerning this "Attaching a Bearing to Mild Steel" thread.... does anyone have any good suggestions for tools that can be made or tools that can be bought so that a person could HOLD these ODD types of metal together WHILE using both hands to BRAZE with ? I seem to be having a difficult time "CREATING" or "FINDING" decent Clamps or 'third hands' that can hold "AWKWARD" objects firmly in place. Any suggestions on how to HOLD items firmly together such as the Bearing and Rods or SIMILAR 'weird shaped' steel objects would be greatly appreciated !
Cheers,
/FC....
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OK let's take Iggy's example of 9/16 rod and a 1' ball. If you have a chunk of 7/32 material this will raise the level of the rod so the center is in line with the ball.
If you were to dimple the end of the rod, it would set snugly in the ball. You can clamp the rod down to 7/32 plate sitting on the top of the welding table, and then use another block > 1/2 inch to restrain the ball against the end of the rod.
If you had a bunch of them to do you could make a dedicated fixture, but for onesy twosys this method works just fine.
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I used a magnet to restrain the ball, and miscellaneous junk to raise the rod to the proper level.
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On Wed, 29 Oct 2008 08:58:07 -0700 (PDT), Jman

I use drillpress vises, visegrips and sometimes magnets.
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I used a magnet and the welding clamp to set that stuff on the table aligned. Then I tack welded them (required no physical contact and no movement) and then I could do whatever I wanted with them.
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Great Suggestions on how to keep things in place while welding them...
I used a 45 degree magnet and similar stuff to hold a number of pieces together but I did notice that the magnet will certainly melt with any substantial heat from either the torch or the MIG. I'm going to try a few things and see if I can't come up with some kind of 'Third Hand System" to assist with that...
One thing that drives me nuts is that I always seem to have a problem getting metal pieces at the proper angles ('straight up and down or across').... An example of this would be tacking and subsequently welding 4 - 36" angle iron pieces to plate steel to be used as legs on a table. I can never seem to get the SOB's perfectly (or near perfectly..) straight ! Is there a trick to welding legs onto plate or other angle while keeping them really straight ?
Cheers,
/Jman...
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I tack weld the pieces lightly, then bend them into position and hold them there with diagonal braces clamped to the other tack-welded parts.
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On Thu, 30 Oct 2008 02:01:42 -0700 (PDT), Jman

Jig things so the legs are square in two dimensions. Tack weld. Correct out-of-square condition with taps and bumps. Finish weld. Correct out-of-square condition with large hammer and/or hydraulics.
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