Can anyone ID this Detroit Diesel?

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What attracted me to it was that the air intake (or exhaust) on the
turbocharger was taped with duct tape. So, I thought, someone cared
about it enough to tape it. The auction said "detroit diesel series
350 power unit". But the auctioneer does not always know what he is
describing, for example the rotary table and a separate backplate in
one lot, was described as "lathe chuck".
So... Anyone has seen this sort of thing before?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus1592
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Perhaps a Series 50? 8.5 liter (519 cu inch) OHC 4 cyl electronically controlled engine introduced in 1993 - common in city busses, trucks, motorhomes, etc???
Reply to
clare
That is what I thuoght too, series 50.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus1592
I don't know much about them, but the shape and transmission and color suggest to me it came out of a piece of construction equipment. Some sort of tractor or front-end loader maybe?
daestrom
Reply to
daestrom
I think if you go to Google Images with the search for Detroit Series 50 diesel you will see something very familiar.
Reply to
Michael B
Looks like a 50 Series out of a loader.
Reply to
Steve W.
Iggy, It is a 3-53. The valve cover indicates it was manufactured in the early 1970's. It is a bit odd, as very few were turbocharged. It is also designed for a vehicle of some sort. They are excellent motors. The standard engine is rated at 85 hp continuous at 2800 rpm. It should have a limiting speed governor set for 3100 rpm. I would assume about 110 hp with the turbo. Core value is about $1,000 + - . Steve
Reply to
Steve Lusardi
1970's. It is a bit odd, as very few were turbocharged.
standard engine is rated at 85 hp continuous at
assume about 110 hp with the turbo. Core value is
Steve, I looked at some images of 3-53 and it looks spot-on. Any idea what its weight may be?
Maybe it does not have a turbocharger, all I know is what I see on the pic.
If you look at this picture
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Then perhaps the appendage on the right is the same as on my engine, and is not a turbocharger, afer all.
I always wanted to mess with a DD -53 or a -71 engine and post some youtube videos. Never could come across one where there is no risk. Finally got this one for $200 sight unseen.
I think that I will put it inside my now enclosed trailer, so that I could work on it regardless of weather.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus1592
When I was in the trucking business in the mid 1970's a "Detroit 350" usually referred to a Supercharged and Turbocharged 8V71 in other words a V configured, eight cylinder with 71 cubic inches for each cylinder with an output of 350 horsepower. The same engine was used in various GM trucks, heavy equipment and stationary engines. The same engine minus the Turbocharger was a "318". The big dog in the V71 series was the 12V71 or 16V71 in trucks and equipment and in stationary uses. The V71 series were upgraded to V92's in the late 1970's. An 8V92 with a supercharger and Turbocharger put out 430 Horsepower in their trucks. They had a tremendous weight advantage when used in a truck versus the Caterpillar and Cummins motors. As much as 1500 pounds for the same horsepower. That alone made them very popular with many fleet operators. Just looking at that picture it is difficult to tell what engine it is. It doesn't look like an eight cylinder to me so I doubt if it is a "350" but what the Hell I was a Cat man.
DL
Reply to
TwoGuns
I picked it up. I had no time to look at it, but it does seem to be a 3-53 Detroit Diesel. The auctioneer guy told me that it works, but the rest of the machine was not worth salvaging, so they mothballed it. As always it may or may not be true.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus29073
Iggy, I am VERY familiar with this motor. I have built several and have many spare parts in storage. I run a 3-53 as my auxiliary in the sailboat I have been building . These DDA Detroits are very customizable. Not only do they come both left hand and right hand, the governor and supercharger (airbox blower) can be on the left or right side. The head can be swapped around as well, along with the cam and countershaft. You can take accessory power off both the cam and countershaft front and back. The fuel feed pump can be driven off the left or right side of the flywheel housing, as well as the governor. You can get an aortic start kit that mounts in the airbox access port opposite the blower. You have a choice of 4 different governors for the motor and the list goes on and on. They are built like a Swiss watch. They hate exhaust back pressure. There are a myriad of fuel injectors that work on this. You will probably find it has S45s or S50s, but I use the newer N type injector now.
The most common failure is head cracking across the exhaust valve seats and it is almost always caused by loss of coolant and the operator sleeping at the switch. The early versions of this motor had a two exhaust valve head. Most of those were stationary units (Pumps & Generators). In the late sixties the US Army used an aluminum version of this motor with an Iron 4 valve head in their Gamma Goat rough terrain articulated field truck. These were phased out in the eighties, but these units can still be found. Good luck with the project. If you take some more pictures, I will be able to tell you more. As far as weight, they can vary quite a bit based on its configuration, but that engine, assuming it's iron, with gearbox and radiator around 900 lbs. As it has the old type valve cover, you will find a build plate along one side. On that plate will be the entire build specs....don't lose it. Steve
1970's. It is a bit odd, as very few were
The standard engine is rated at 85 hp continuous at
assume about 110 hp with the turbo. Core value is
Reply to
Steve Lusardi
Steve, this is great. The engine is in my enclosed trailer:
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Since the trailer is enclosed, I will try to unfreeze it tonight with a space heater. I can put a big light in the trailer and work on it in relative comfort.
Do you know if I can find manuals for this engine online?
Also, while I am dreaming, let's say I get it started, hypothetically. All it needs is fuel and cranking, after all.
How do I shut it down?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus29073
Shut off the fuel supply (and/or stop cranking)? ;)
Reply to
Morris Dovey
A working engine would not stop if I discontinue cranking:)
I like the first suggestion however, so: how do I shut off fuel supply on this one?
Don't those Detroits have a special air baffle (slam door) to stop runaway engine operation? Steve Lusardi must know what I am talking about.
That's why I am worried about shutting this DD down:
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i
Reply to
Ignoramus29073
Shut off the fuel. It will have a "kill" linkage.
Reply to
clare
A piece of 5/8 or 4/4" plywood slapped over the inlet will do it. Don't try anything less substantial. I saw a set of coveralls go right through one. If the turbo oil seal lets go, shutting them down can be problematic.
Reply to
clare
Is it a 3 lunger or a 4 lunger? A 3-53 0r 3-71 are 3 lungers. A series 50 is a 4 lunger.
Reply to
clare
Exactly, the motor runs on lubricating oil, it is beyond scary. It also produces so much smoke, that I would be unable to even enter the trailer or if I am there, I would have to get the hell out. I will keep a piece of metal handy to slam shut the intake and I may try to pipe the intake or exhaust to outside.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus29073
Iggy, When you defrost the engine, you will find the Governor, which will be located either on the right or left side of the motor. It is bolted to the front of the flywheel housing. (It is probably the more simple limiting speed governor) On top of the governor there will be two levers. The long one is the throttle and the short one is the stop lever, which closes the injector rack down. The short lever must be set to run before cranking. Stopping the motor is simply moving the short lever to stop.
The runaway diesel threat for DDs is usually not on the injector side , but from ingesting its own lube oil from an internal leak into the air box. Your engine will usually not have the clapper door on the blower intake. Those are mostly found on marine configurations. Not having one is a non issue, just have pillow ready to stuff over the inlet screen of the blower in case this happens. It is common practice when starting an unknown engine to pull the valve cover and remove the cotter pin on the lever coming from the governor to the injector rack. This allows you, the operator, to control the rack manually. Doing this allows you to visually observe the function of the governor and look for fuel line leaks around the injectors and injector pipes. I suggest you hang a fuel container above the engine and run the feed line to the pump, as well as the return line from the fuel log in the head. This allows self priming. Do not be over rambunctious when operating the rack. The throttle response is instantaneous. You could end up with the motor in your lap, as it won't be bolted down.
I have both a full 53 series set of manuals, including parts books in paper. I bought them new from DD many years ago. The parts books are VERY helpful. If you need parts, most of the dealers insist on having the serial number of the engine, as the build of every engine is on the computer. This creates a problem if you are doing a custom build and can only be overcome when you have the part number. Yes, if you search on eBay, you will find manuals on CD being advertised. I don't know if the parts data is included, but they are cheap. You will also need many special tools to work on these. I made most of my own, but some of the original Kent Moore gauges are required. They too are occasionally on eBay. You have to watch. If you run into a problem, you can contact me off-line and I may be able to help.
Some additional points, the major difference between the 53 series and the other DDA series is that the 53s are wet sleeve(cylinder liner) and the others are dry sleeve. You MUST pull the cover to the airbox and inspect for water and oil FIRST before attempting to crank the motor. Also you should turn the motor over with a breaker bar one full revolution, just in case there is water in a cylinder, otherwise you will bend connecting rods just by cranking from the starter motor. (22 to 1 compression ratio) Steve
Reply to
Steve Lusardi
i, Steve knows this engine so confirm with him. Nearly all diesels have a shut off solenoid on the injector pump. For it to start, it must be pulled in by +12 volt. drop power and engine dies. When you turn the key off on a diesel, that's all you're doing.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend

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