Can anyone ID this Detroit Diesel?

Lloyd on another note DD did build a 51 series for a short time in the early fifties. I think they were for the railroads, but they are very rare. Steve
Reply to
Steve Lusardi
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Ignoramus30015 wrote in news:q_OdnQJyULhorInQnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
I have nothing to contribute but kudos
nice job!
Reply to
z
"Steve Lusardi" fired this volley in news:if44ms $hpg$02$ snipped-for-privacy@news.t-online.com:
Funny, that... When they trained us in Vallejo and when we worked on them 'Nam, they always _told_ us we were working on 651s AND 653s. There were a lot of older boats with them. (older being sort of relative, since the "glass slippers" didn't last very long, but we salvaged and re- used anything we could, down in the tippy-tip muddy end of IVCorps.
When I came back in-country and did some work on a few touring busses, I found there were lots of 651s around.
I even have a personal anecdote where an adjustable wrench got left on top of the blower on a 651-powered bus. After a 200-mile round-trip to Washington, D.C. and back to the barn, the wrench never fell off...
The 1271s were that smooth, too, if they were in half-way decent shape.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Gunner Asch fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
The 12V71s had a reputation for the rack jamming (actually, the governor link) and running away. Our machinist mate told me (but I never saw it happen) that he had something like 15 seconds to lift the hatch, jump down in between the engines, pop the rack cover, and manually jack the rack to OFF.
I think I'm glad I never did see it, as that engine had a max working RPM of 2450 on the boats, and supposedly red-lined at about 3600.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
My DD353, there is a intake shutoff, just pull on it lightly and all intake is stopped.
I lifted the engine yesterday (on blocks). The pan has a small leak, I put a plastic tub under it.
I ordered a gasket, when I reinstall the oil pan, I will be sure to have a shutoff hooked up for easy shut down.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus4804
that motor on some APCs and those are very rare.
in-line 53s is very true. Many of the parts are
53T motors is that they use a blow through blower, as
that use twisted rotors. When the turbo boost
pressure to shift an internal bar in the rotor against an
drilled holes in the rotors. DD stated that relieving
DDAs were very high tech motors and way ahead of
Back when I was growing up in Elmira Ontario there was a guy ran a small excavating business - basically a back-hoe service - and had a late 50's GMC dumptruck with a 6-71 and a hi-hoe with a 3-71. The 6-71 "talked" through 2 staight pipes about 5" diameter up the back of the cab, and when Ibra opened that thing up going up the hill out of town towing the 'hoe it was music to a motorheads ears!!!
Having the 3-71 and 6-71 meant he only needed to keep one set of spares to service both units.
Same oil filter, same fuel filter, most of the gaskets, etc.
He dug wells with that 'hoe and would often have it so far down in the hole you couldn't see the boom, and he'd crab it back out on it's own, using the bucket and hoe.
Reply to
clare
We had just one Fairbanks-Morse (nuc boat). But it had an intake flapper you could trip from the deck above the diesel engine if you had a runaway or such.
daestrom
Reply to
daestrom
Ignoramus27085 fired this volley in news:jNSdnRs8avXOc4rQnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
No such on the MK-1 PCFs. I don't know about MK-3s. Never crewed on one.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Agreed re: runaways. I was told a story about a LARGE marine engine where the teller's farther was the hero; everyone else fled and he rammed a bale of cotton waste into the air intake, stopping the engine. It too had an air cutoff door, but the runaway just ate it & kept going.
I ran into this with a VW Rabbit a friend owned. Not good. Burning SAE 10W-40 vs #2 melts the glowplugs as well as not stopping when you need it to.
I like the CO2 idea; just be sure it's not a dry power extinguisher when you grab it.
Reply to
David Lesher
If dry powder is all you got, it will probably work in a pinch and would be better than letting the engine blow apart. I wouldn't want to predict what damage the powder would do to the engine though.
In preparing to extinguish a small engine room fire caused by a welder I once had a Chief MM snatch a dry powder extinguisher out of my hands before I could trigger it. He quickly replaced it with a CO2 unit which made a lot less mess than the dry powder would have.
Vaughn
Reply to
vaughn
That powder is VERY corrosive inside a running engine... Most insurance appraisers will declare the engine SCRAP, if it was stopped with a Dry Chemical Extinguisher, or require it to be IN-Framed before they would insure it on a Machinery Policy, again.... Just say'en....
Reply to
Bruce Gordon
It better be a BIG CO2 extinguisher though. A 671 wound up is 750cfm at 3000 RPM at atmospheric - at least double that through the blower, so you need a good 1500 cu ft of CO2 to be sure you are going to bring it to a halt - and a runaway g71 will be a lot more than 3000 RPM - more like 6000, so at least 3000 CU ft of CO2 available to the intake. Thats something like 400 POUNDS of CO2 (based on 556 cu meters per tonne at 70F and 1 atmosphere)(15012 cu ft/tonne)(6.23 cu ft/lb) Based on information from
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OK, so you don't need 100% CO2 charge to stop the engine - but suffice it to say a 25 pounder isn't going to cut the mustard . The engine will progressively slow down, inhaling less CO2 as it slows down, so I'd say a 50 lb or 2 25lb extinquishers would be MINIMUM to have available if you are counting on killing a runaway 6-71 (426 cubic inch displacement 2 stroke)
Reply to
clare
Besides the mess, a standard dry chemical extinguisher is not going to be nearly as effective as a CO2, and will definitely require an engine teardown (adviseable after a run-away in any event - but a lot messier when filled with powder.)
Reply to
clare
I've seen a pair of coveralls go through a runaway deisel before the chunk of steel plate slapped over the intake finally did the job. It was a six cyl turbo deisel - not sure of the make or model as it was something like 30 years ago.
Reply to
clare
Powder makes a terrible mess, but less so than toasted corpses do..... it really is magic for burning liquids such as fuel oil/gasoline/etc.
CO2 extinguishers are downplayed by firefighter types...they don't work well at all outdoors, etc.
Reply to
David Lesher

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