Car Stands from wood?

I have a small (=light) car that will need a lot of work done. It would be easier if it was off the ground by more than the height those car stands you
get at the auto stores can do.
So I'm thinking of making some stands from wood, and jacking it up in stages onto them. Has anyone done this, and are there any pitfalls (a particularly appropriate term) of which I should be aware?
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Hello'o! Here is the rivet and weld section of the usenet, not the dowel and clue part of it (that I would locate far bejond some dark corner). So we would all suggest to make your stand out of steel and save your live. Even a smal car on your chest is no fun. I know someone who has broken _all_ ribs except 3 or 4 when a car fell on his chest (during an race accident).
Nick
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Nick Mόller wrote:

Considering that it is standard practice to support cranes weighing 90+ tons on stacks of 6x6 wood cribbing, I hardly think that there is any risk in doing the same with a ton or two of car.
As long as there are no holes, there is no chance of something snapping. You have to use solid wood and cross stack over a large enough area to give stability.
Pete C.
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Making wood stands, also, does not require a welding machine. All that it srequires is a saw and screwdriver or a hammer.
i
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... and also making it hard to access the car from the underside.
Nick
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On Sat, 9 Jul 2005 10:14:31 -0300, "jtaylor"

I heard from a friend who rebuilt wrecked cars as a hobby that wood is OK but not concrete blocks. Blocks can crush suddenly and drop the car. Wood, however, will only compress a little bit. Randy
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Talking about wrecking yards.......... Some of them weld a couple of wheel rims together to make stands for cars. One horizontal and one vertical. Eight rims and a few minutes of welding would do it. Maybe you can find someone that would weld them for you locally. Your local auto wrecking yard might have some already made they would sell you.
Dan
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wrote:

I would make them from solid wood (say, pieces of 10" boards screwed together).
i
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I just cut a couple of stands to fit the tractor, car or whatever I'm working on with the chainsaw while I'm cutting firewood. Use a solid enough piece of timber to make a good stand, and they roll when they are tipped over on their side so you can put them back in the shed.
The tractor is 3 ton, the dozer shovel is 4 ton, so I choose good thick logs to cut them from. You could probably find something good to work with and get it cut to size at your local sawmill, or get some old recycled house stumps or bridge timbers. Make sure they are wide enough to support the car with the sideways forces that you will apply with a spanner on tight bolts.
As another poster said, don't use bricks, concrete blocks or similar as they can crumble and collapse. You do not want to be underneath something heavy trying to hold it up with the side of your head......
Hope this helps, Peter
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On Sun, 10 Jul 2005 01:21:40 +1000, "Bushy Pete"

Not a good idea to use wood blocking with the grain vertical unless you are trying to stop horizontal movement. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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On Sun, 10 Jul 2005 01:21:40 +1000, "Bushy Pete"

And NEVER EVER use the end grain to support ANYTHING. If you use a log, put a plank across the end the car/truck/tractor or whatever sits on. If (when) the log splits, it WILL ruin your day.
ramps made from dimensional lumber, "nail laminated" together, make very safe vehicle supports. Use combinations of 2X4, 2X6 and 2X8, staggered layer to layer, with alternate layers having a peice or two running crosswise to keep the stack from splitting, and nothing made from steel will be safer.

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Actually concrete blocks are pretty strong, IF you put the holes vertical and put a 2x on the top (and bottom unless dirt). Concrete is very strong but will crumble if stress is allowed to accumulate at one spot.
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Problem with concrete blocks is that they crumble at unexpected times and do it in a total failure mode.
Nick Hull wrote:

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If that were really true no one would use them for the foundation of their house. In fact, when the ground slides and concrete block foundations crack, they almost invariably crack in a zigzag line of the mortar. If you are afraid to go under a vehicle PROPERLY supported by concrete blocks, how do you get the courage to go into your house and how do people manage to live & sleep in mobile homes supported by the flimsiest of concrete block stacks?

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Not really. In their intended use, the loads are very evenly distributed. Setting the weight of part of a car on a small point on the block is a very different stress.

Well, put it this way. When we block up a car for an extrication in the firefighting world, we use wood cribbing. Cranes, as mentioned, use wood cribbing. Cement block for building, wood for cribbing. If there's a standard material for a purpose, why not use it? The load that a house puts on block is very even, and all compression. If your car puts a point load on the concrete, it puts a tension load on either side of that contact, and concrete stinks in tension.
Since it's a matter of putting your body under it, I'll go with what has been used for a few millennia, myself.
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Put another way: One shot from my .357 will completely destroy a 12" concrete block, biggest piece is 6" or so. The 8"x10 tapered timbers I use for car ramps wouldn't even notice. Same weight I might add. Net: Concrete is very good in pure compression, wood is very fiberous, concrete fails suddenly, wood fails gracefully.
Concrete blocks used in a basement are carefully bedded in mortar tofully distribute the load. Block and brick cutters are nothing more than a press with a concetrated load. Snaps blocks with very little effort. They really don't handle a concentrated load at all well.
Nick Hull wrote:

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jtaylor wrote:

Can you rent a bay that has a hoist? That would be the best solution by a long shot. Know anyone that has a pit in their garage that has not been filled in?
Wood to get higher than a normal jackstand? Two options. Build a very solid ramp or cribbing.
We had a ramp on the farm when I was a kid. The posts that it sat on were telephone poles sunk into the ground by a couple or five feet. The ramps themselves were 2 x 12 and 2 x 18 rough cut lumber. It was removed after many years use as an oil change and work platform after the posts began to show signs of rot. Big wood is expensive, and the time and work needed to build one are prohibitive.
Cribbing is used almost universally to lift and hold up large and heavy things, like houses. Got a source for short ends of boards? Cross stacked wood holds up well and is relatively stable, and a patient person with a pile of wood blocks can accomplish a lot, but you will have to work out how you will rest the car upon the cribbing so that it is secure and balanced, so that it will not fall if you bump into the car in the shop.
Myself, I have always used jackstands, with a couple large blocks of firewood as a backup when I had to spend time beneath one of my cars. A smooth concrete floor and a good creeper are a help.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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Dave wrote:

Interesting is a good word for that..... Intersting to trust ones life to chinese hydraulics... Interesting to trust ones life to chinese welding... Yup. Interesting. :-) As long as one ned not go under it.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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On Sat, 09 Jul 2005 10:35:22 -0600, the opaque Trevor Jones

http://www.harborfreight.com/manuals/46000-46999/46604.pdf Read safety tip #7 where it says "Never work underneath a vehicle without using additional safety support devices (i.e. jack stands) to support the vehicle." Good mechanics ALL know never to trust a single hoist or jack. That's common sense.
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