Cast alluminum

Hi all,
I had a little accident involving a fork lift and one of my glass lathes. End result was one of the cranking wheels to move the carriage was broken.
The spokes broke free of the hub. I believe it is cast aluminum.
What would be the best way to fix it other than something like JB Weld?
Thanks,
Randy Hansen
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What is a glass lathe?

You could probably have it TIG welded (or even MIG welded) if, in fact, it is aluminum and not some kind of pot metal. If your shop is capable, you could machine a new one. Or you could buy a generic replacement.
- Michael
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A lathe for turning glass as it is blown. One of the local metalworkers works as a mechanical engineer and gave me a tour of his facility. That was one of the cooler toys they had.
http://www.littonengr.com/Lathes.html
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Cool. Thanks for the info and the link. Too bad the images are small and there are no photos of the lathes in operation.
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"Click for larger photo" worked here.
To come back to the subject: Yes, welding MIG/TIG would be OK. No big load (as long as fork lifts are not involved).
Nick
--
Motor Modelle // Engine Models
http://www.motor-manufaktur.de
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wrote:

I was referring to the "larger" photos! Perhaps I should have been more clear: too bad the images are not of higher resolution and more detailed.
- Michael
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Given the chance you can place a piece of support material around the broken spokes, your idea is actually quite a good one. In a moment of stupidity, I tipped over my rather trashy Crapsman overarm saw, which has been indispensable in building our shop and house. The handle broke off the saw when it tipped over, so I repaired it exactly as you suggested, with a couple small strips of aluminum added to each side of the handle to lend strength. It's been that way for a few years now and has worked perfectly, although it's not very pretty. That's OK, I'm not, either. :-)
Welding by any means is likely to result in a rather crooked running wheel, although with care it might turn out fine. You would have complete control using epoxy, which, I think, in this instance, would be my first choice. I keep thinking of a small piece of tubing placed over each of the spokes, if you get my drift.
Good luck!
Harold
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I would try TIG'ing it, or put it together using JB weld, use it as a pattern and have a backyard metalcaster type cast you a new one........
wrote:

=============================================Put some color in your cheeks...garden naked! "The original frugal ponder" ~~~~ }<((((o> ~~~~~~ }<{{{{o> ~~~~~~~ }<(((((o>
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Randy H. wrote:

You may want to look at http://www.use-enco.com/ and search for "handwheels". MSC, Mcmaster-Carr, and several other vendors also carry them. It may be simpler just to replace it with a new one that is similar. --Glenn Lyford
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wrote:

Hey Randy,
Does it look like any of these??
<https://reidecom.reidtool.com/xephr/edit/CATEGORY?query =*START_WITH_ID532>
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Randy H. wrote: ... cranking wheels to move the carriage was broken.

...
If it is aluminum, not pot metal, and you don't have a welder, you could use that aluminum soldering stuff ("Alumiweld" or something like that). Works with a propane torch, MAPP is better. Kinda pricey, though. If you could scrounge up a little zinc, it would probably work just as well (the alumiweld is mostly zinc). A roofer might have some zinc scraps.
Or just use JBWeld, there isn't much force on the wheel.
Bob
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Once there was a product called Liquid Al and Liquid Steel. In a tube. See if you can find it in a hardware store.
Martin
Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH, NRA Life NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
Randy H. wrote:

-
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Thanks for all the help. It's much appreciated!
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My choice would be OA fusion welding using 5% silicon filler rod. Should not be difficult if carefully pre-heated and supported.
--
Regards,

Chas.

(To E-Mail me replace 'xxx' with tango papa golf)
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