What is it? Set 467

I need some help with the third and fifth items this week:
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Rob
Reply to
Rob H.
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2716 look like a spring from a clip board
Reply to
Robert
Rob H. wrote the following on 11/15/2012 4:02 AM (ET):
2713 The original snowmobile! :-)
Reply to
willshak
Posting from my desk top PC, as always.
2713 jockey horse cart? 2714 coat rack for the Seven Dwarves? 2715 don't know. 2716 yoke for carrying groceries? 2717 no idea 2718 some kind of motor, maybe?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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I need some help with the third and fifth items this week:
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Rob
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
2713 - Planting Sled.
Reply to
walkerk
2718 Based on extreme ignorance, I'd say this is what I'd expect the receiver of an electrically operated chain-gun to look like.
Reply to
Alexander Thesoso
2715 - a marking guage?
Bill
Reply to
Bill
2716: elephant IUD ;-)
Kerry
Reply to
Kerry Montgomery
Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2713) This looks to me to be a device for sprinkling sand, ashes or salt on an ice covered roadway. The sled runners on the front, and the horse-drawn image of a larger version in the background.
I'm not sure whether there is some linkage from the wheels to t he shaker in the long box, or whether someone was expected to ride on the platform over the wheels, and turn the disc in the center of the box.
2714) I think that this is also ice related. Either as a traction item when moved parallel to the crossbar, or to mark cut lines on a frozen pond prior to sawing and harvesting the ice. It was stored in sheds packed with sawdust as insulation.
2715) A tool to mark a line down the center of a plank, (or at some other offset depending on the setting of the guides.
2716) Frankly, this looks like some insulated solid copper wire, typical of house wiring. The black plastic is insulation, probably a PVC (Poly-Vinyl-Chloride).
Someone wound it around a rod, slid it off, partially unwound the center, and formed the ends into loops -- probably just for the fun of it, not for any functional reason.
A close look at one of the ends (if it is not too tucked against the side) should show the color of copper in the middle.
2717) The pair of O-rings around each suggest that it is to be a snug fit in some form of cylinder. The slightly larger end plate limits how far in it can go, and the threaded shaft in the handle probably compresses the length to expand the O-rings to grip the cylinder -- therefore to be used to pull it out. Perhaps for removing wet liners in some older internal combustion engine styles, such as the one in the Triumph TR-3 (which I believe used the engine originally for the Ferguson tractor.)
2718) Hmm ... military, given the color.
Rotates as the carriage slides on the clamp sleeve.
Perhaps for throwing a coiled line and weight across a gap to start building a bridge of some sort?
Perhaps to launch some kind of grenade or other explosive device.
I think that it is designed to be powered by a rifle, and clamps to the barrel of it.
Now to post and then see what others have suggested.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Correct, it's for planting corn.
Reply to
Rob H.
This item is made entirely of plastic and it's not a spring.
Reply to
Rob H.
2716 I have a vague feeling that I've seen things like this used as a twist-tie to bundle or group wires. From the size, something like this could be used to bundle telephone cables on utility poles.
Reply to
Alexander Thesoso
After a little more memory exercise, this might be a tangent cable support. When something like a phone or power cable passes by a utility pole and must be held up, the center of something like this is fastened to the utility pole and each end coiled around the cable.
Reply to
Alexander Thesoso
it's for holding powerlines to their insulators.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
Good answer! The person who sent the photo said that it's a tie for holding high tension lines to the support insulator.
Reply to
Rob H.
2717: Well, red can mean hydrogen and yellow chlorine. Patent #4070861 was for a reactor using hydrogen and chlorine for propulsion or electrical generation. Oxygen, perhaps air, was added to control the reaction.
Reply to
j Burns
2718: an 18-inch 7342 and an 18-inch 7343.
Reply to
Zz Yzx
2717- some kind of oddball in-the-field centerless grinding jig?
Reply to
spamTHISbrp
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com fired this volley in news:49de85e5-7d51-4cb2-b461- snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com:
looks more to me like something to abrasively bore the spooge out of a cooling gallery or a valve lifter hole between two cylinders of an engine.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
....
Grenade launcher is correct, these are fairly common now but the ones in the photo were experimental models.
Still not 100% sure about the two mystery items but the rest of the answers have been posted here:
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Rob
Reply to
Rob H.

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