What is it? Set 454

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Rob H. wrote the following on 8/16/2012 4:07 AM (ET):
2635 Some kind of slide hammer. 2637 Reusable wine cork. 2640 Vise for sharpening saw blades.
Reply to
willshak
2635 looks like a slide action banger, rather than slide action puller. I'd guess maybe a hole maker, for planting seeds.
2636, looks like it clamps on the table, pushes, and cranks. Beyond that, nothing comes to mind.
2637 bottle stopper, for some rather high cost something or other.
2638, nothing comes to mind. Is the V shaped metal to the right rigid, or floppy?
2639, seriously no ideas.
2640, probably farrier.
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I need some help with the fourth and fifth items this week:
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Rob
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
2636 : to crimp Shotgun shells after reloading ?
keep on doing this interesting blog, thanks
Am 16.08.2012 10:07, schrieb Rob H.:
Reply to
Walter Kraft
2637: barrel plug for muzzle loader. It's feasible to carry a modern rifle pointed down. Muzzle loaders often had longer barrels, and I'm told the bullet could fall out of a smoothbore. Moisture in the barrel could cause a misfire, which was worse with a muzzle loader.
Reply to
J Burns
Some really intriguing tools this week! : )
My guesses:
2636: For reloading (ammunition)
#2640 For a farrier (a little light, but would be easier to tote than an anvil)
#2639 Is Really Interesting!
Bill
Reply to
Bill
Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2635) A slide hammer with a spike for punching into sheet metal or for breaking glass (perhaps windshields after an accident?)
2636) Not sure -- it depends on the surface of the pin rotated by the crank. It could be that the end grips a piece of wood or other workpiece and the fork on the lever turns a bevel on the other end. Or it could be that the fork prevents rotation, and the end of the rotating pin cuts a particular shape (possibly just flat) on the end of the workpiece.
2637) One of the two tuning adjustments of a flute. This one goes on the other side of the mouthpiece from the fingering holes. The knob moves the cork towards or away from the mouthpiece hole to optimize the performance of the vibrating air column.
The other adjustment is a slide between the mouthpiece and the fingering holes.
2638) It sort of looks like something to slip over the head of a small animal to make it difficult for it to go through brush.
2639) Looks as though its function is to hold two rectangular rods (steel, wood, whatever) at one of five different angles, one of which should be parallel, based on the looks.
2640) I believe that this is a vise specifically for sharpening a saw.
It is held closed by a foot on the pedal, released by relaxing the foot, at which point the saw blade is slid to bring another area where it is supported by the jaws.
I don't think that the grip is strong enough for much beyond that -- just for holding the saw blade while it is sharpened with a file.
Now to post and then see what others have suggested.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Well at least we solved one of the two unidentified items this week, unfortunately it wasn't the wooden tool, I'd like to hear the answer for that one. The solutions for the rest of them can be seen here:
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Reply to
Rob H.
I can imagine a use for 2639. Suppose you have a chicken pen with a framed doorway big enough for a person to walk through. Every day, the hens and chicks go out to feed.
Suppose you have a mesh panel to fit that hole. A hinge pin sticks up from the center of the top of the panel, to engage a hole in the bar along the top of the pen. The mystery latch would serve as a hinge at the center of the bottom.
The latch would be bolted to a strip of iron, through the bottom slot. The iron would be fastened to the sill at the bottom of the doorway.
The center of the bottom of the panel would be another iron strip, with a hole big enough to go over the bolt head in the upper groove of the latch. Stick the iron in the groove.
Now the latch allows you to keep the door closed or to swing it 11 or 22 degrees each way, keeping the hens in but allowing chicks up to a certain size out.
Hens are good at incubating eggs and keeping young chicks alive, but chicks raised by hens may not be tame. Perhaps removing chicks would increase egg production, too.
Reply to
J Burns
Gosh, I had to read the abstract of the patent to understand how the icepick worked. Don't laugh, you probably would to (the directions are in the last paragraph)!
Reply to
Bill
In a flock where hens incubated eggs, there would be chicks of various sizes. The sill height could keep the youngest chicks in the pen. The door might be put in place once a week, to separate the older chicks. Perhaps one notch would normally be just right. The farmer would open it to the second notch if some chicks were a little too big that week.
Reply to
J Burns
#2639 Maybe a clamp a craftman would have made to assist with something like "wet bending"? Maybe to make a chair? Sorry I can't do better--I really tried to find the answer...
Reply to
Bill
For those of us familiar with a slide hammer, I doubt it. One of the things which I had suggested it being for was breaking glass in a car windshield for rescue purposes. Breaking ice is not that different. :-)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Okay, admittedly I've never heard of a slide hammer. But I have a hunch how one works now...
Bill
One
Reply to
Bill

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