What is it? Set 483

I need some help with the third, fourth, and fifth items this week:
formatting link

Rob
Reply to
Rob H.
Loading thread data ...
2809 looks a bit like a tie down strap for moving loads. Like truckers use. 2810, not enough picture to tell. 2811, holds hot pots on a counter top? 2812, maybe for cleaning electrical terminals? Squeeze and pull? 2813, totally no clue. 2814, totally no clue.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
formatting link
.
I need some help with the third, fourth, and fifth items this week:
formatting link

Rob
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
2811 For removing corn kernels from the cob?
2812 Looks like it could be a cleaner for 8 or 16 mm movie film. Just a guess.
2814 An antique bicycle stand.
Reply to
anorton
Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
First off -- still having problems with the "Larger Image" links.
2809) The patent drawing is of a more complex version of this device though I think that the intended function is the same.
Looking at it -- it is designed to allow lowering a load (perhaps a basket or shelf) under some control -- you have to pull on the chain to lower it, and ideally support it with one hand to control the rate of descent.
Once you release the chain it will lock at the nearest notch up from that point. (The drawing shows one with finer step in the spacing of the notches, and thus finer control over the position.)
A flat brass strap bears the load, and a spiral steel spring is on the inside of the drum to provide partial lifting force.
Whenever you lift it, it will advance the ratchet and lock at a higher position than the point from which you started lifting it.
I can't tell what the intended load is.
2810) This looks like a leather, and from the burned-in brand, it is either Buffalo leather, or a synthetic made to look like leather and sold under the name "Buffalo Hide" or something similar.
2811) Looks like another tight jar lid opener. Covers a wide range of sizes.
2812) This looks like a tool intended for cleaning the surfaces of interchangeable hard disk platters in cartridges. It is probably supposed to be used one time only per end.
2813) It *might* be a wall mounted support for small flags, or perhaps torches.
2814) Looks to me like a stand for a brass or bronze gong of Asian manufacture.
Now to post and then see what others have suggested.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Could be, I still don't know the answer for this one.
I don't know if it's right, but I like this guess.
Correct
Reply to
Rob H.
Apparently photobucket is not currently supported in the Opera browser, as mentioned here:
formatting link

Good answer, it is for raising and lowering something, something typically found it a rich person's home.
That was my guess when I first saw it, but I haven't been able to find another one like it to prove it.
Could be, this is another one that I've had no luck on so far.
Sounds possible, as usual hand carved items can be very difficult to figure out and verify.
Reply to
Rob H.
Probably a "didntpaytheirfairshare".
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
formatting link
.
Good answer, it is for raising and lowering something, something typically found it a rich person's home.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
"Rob H." <
A dumbwaiter hoist?
Reply to
Phil Kangas
Nope, that's not it.
Reply to
Rob H.
formatting link

Hmm ... while they say that they support "Firefox 3.6 or later", the FireFox which I am running (14.0.1 for SPARC and Solaris) does not like it. (But the 14.* series is a weird branch and I'm not sure how it relates to 3.6 (which is not available for the UltraSPARC under Solaris. :-)
I can't see why they have to use all the fancy bells and whistles, instead of writing their web pages to run on standards-compliant browsers. :-)
And given the number of security holes in JavaScript, designing a page to *
require* it is stupid in my mind -- unless they are doing so to take advantage of the security holes for whatever reason. :-)
At least they aren't requiring java, which has a large number of recently-reported holes now, too.
I've stopped using Opera because they no longer support Solaris on the SPARC CPUs.
Chrome was never an option.
Same for Safari (except on a Mac).
And certainly not Internet Explorer of *
any* version.
[ ... ]
O.K. Dumbwaiter, then I would guess that with the flat bronze strap, it could handle a distance typical of that between adjacent floors.
And I got into the list sooner than usual to post it.
[ ... ]
That is the problem, of course.
One other suggestion which I have read looks pretty good too -- for cleaning toner off the ionizing wire for laser printers or photocopy machines. That would explain the visible level of contamination better. if a disk had that level, it would be dead already. :-)
Indeed so.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols

Aha! DoN - I think you have hit on it!! I sent the pic in to RobH.
I found it & a pile of other stuff in a steel cabinet I recycled from a verge junk pile.
It was probably the base for an older photocopier!
Reply to
Dennis
Could that cabinet have been the base for an old 16 mm movie projector like they used to wheel around in schools? My guess was it was used to clean movie film.
Reply to
anorton
I guess it could have been, the wheels on the cabinet are very small. The cabinet was probably 18" tall, around 2' deep & wide.
Reply to
Dennis
Thanks for the additional information on the cabinet.
No definitive answers for any of the three unidentified items but there were some good guesses for them:
formatting link
Reply to
Rob H.

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.