What is it? Set 433

I need some help with the fourth and sixth items this week:

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Rob

Reply to
Rob H.
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2510 is a hand-held lifting magnet

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Reply to
Norman Billingham

2514

Buddhist wall ventilator so termites do not suffer on hot days.

Reply to
Gerald Ross
2509: Nut Cracker? 2510: Floor Puller for Computer rooms? 2511: Can opener? 2512: Piano keys? 2513: Jigs for marking lines i metal or wood? 2514: Spr> I need some help with the fourth and sixth items this week:
Reply to
Kenefick
2509 Steak edge tenderizer 2510 magnet, with release and drop capability 2511 wine cork press 2512 some kind of tripod, or easel? 2513 some kind of shim, but for what? 2514 seriously no clue

Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus

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Rob

Reply to
Stormin Mormon

2512 just has to be a fence tightener! phil k.
Reply to
Phil Kangas

The default answer may not work here. :)

It might be a push lever for a crossbow:

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--Winston

Reply to
Winston
2512 - I think it's some sort of fold-up removable leg support for a small fold down (hinged?) table top, shelving.... particular work surface, of some sort. Reminds me of the fold-up leg support for the old in-the-wall ironing boards. Once it is in its hyper-extended position, it is stable when the support angle is opposite the "knee" (flexed) joint.

Sonny

Reply to
Sonny

2514: The ID looks like 1.25". The OD of hose threads is 1.06". I imagine the female end of a garden hose would go through it.

You can't get water if somebody parks on your hose, and being run over can't be good for it. If you used wire to suspend a hose above a driveway, it would probably a kink. With a tube, kinking would be less likely.

If it was found in a deck as pictured, that could be a secondary use. Suppose your outdoor tap is on your deck. Suppose the queen is always dropping in for tea, and you have to get the hose out of the way so she won't trip on it. If it's run through this device, you just unscrew the hose from the tap and let it slide. The female end won't go through, so it will be ready to hook up when she leaves.

Reply to
J Burns

What is #6 made of? Unable to determine if it is wood, copper or ceramic from the picture.

Reply to
Gerald Ross

A tongue puller from the Inquisition? Or an upholsterers tool to grasp leather/fabric? Art

Reply to
Artemus

2509 - They don't look like anything upholstery related, that I know of, though the handles look similar to hog ringer pliers, which are sometimes used in upholstery. It could possibly be ear tattoo pliers for farm animals.

Sonny

Reply to
Sonny

I thought it was ceramic when I posted it this morning but found out this afternoon that it's actually wood.

Reply to
Rob H.

I'll ask the owner what he thinks of this idea.

Reply to
Rob H.

2509 may be hide or leather pulling pliers.

Andy

Reply to
aasberry

Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.

2509) For joining two sheets of thin metal. The spikes on each side fall between those on the other (are there more than one on the near side?) punching both sheets of metal and forming them into spikes surrounding the punch-through and then folding them down to clasp the two sheets together.

Are these really bronze as they appear, or is it a trick of illumination? If they are, then it was also designed to be used in the presence of flamable gases or perhaps powders like airborne flour or gunpowder.

2510) A magnetic pick-up and release tool. Pick up by the red handle and whatever pieces of steel were on the aluminum capped side will stick and be lifted. Pull the uncovered handle, and the permanent magnet will be withdrawn to a position where the field is magnetically shunted, and it will release what it has picked up. (Or possibly rotate the uncovered handle, depending in the internal design.)

2511) Too few angles of view. At a guess, the upper strap loop grips a cylindrical object, and lowers it into the 'V' notch on the foot. I *think* that the loop hinges near where the toothed arc pivots, so the angle of the cylinder can be changed, and the toothed arc serves as a ratchet to select a specific angle.

2512) A lever for lifting something fairly heavy. The 'V' notches on the two feet fit on a rod, and another rod is placed into the notch at the wide end of the long lever. By then pushing down on the narrow end, the part in the notch is lifted.

As to exactly what it is lifting -- that I don't know.

2513) Interesting forms of guided thin chisels. Looking at the right hand end of the bottom one shows that it is hammered to drive the inner chisel blade. The other guide has a chisel surface as well. But I really don't know what they are applied to.

2514) No dimensions given -- other than by the porch planks.

Looks as though it hangs from something (perhaps a tree branch or a nail driven into a tree trunk) and holds some form of pyrotechnic -- or serves a a small cannon. A closer look at the other end, showing whether it is open or closed might help, and especially if it showed a small hole for a fuse.

Now to see what others have suggested.

Enjoy, DoN.

Reply to
DoN. Nichols

snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:

2510 is a tool for picking up small ferromagnetic objects (nuts, nails, screws, etc) or waste (filings, swarf, etc). The red handle is for holding and carrying it; the smaller handle pulls the magnet away from the flat surface at the bottom, releasing the objects.
Reply to
Doug Miller

"DoN. Nichols" fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@Katana.d-and-d.com:

We used to call them "nutso". The guy who spilled the box of nuts on the floor got to use the Nutso to pick them all up!

Lloyd

Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

Well, looks like this one is still a mystery, the owner thought that it could be possible but I would agree that it's hard to say at this point.

Reply to
Rob H.

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