What is it? Set 267

This week's set of photographs has been posted:
formatting link

Rob
Reply to
Rob H.
Loading thread data ...
1513 looks like the front half of an articulated buckboard, but I bet it turns out to be a 'fifth wheel' to be towed behind a cannon to carry the gunpowder or something.
1514: a knife sharpener.
1515: as with many things here...it looks strangely familiar, but I can't put my finger on it.
1516: Spurs for a bullrider
1517: This looks like a straigforward yoke...possibly for something small like a goat or pony?
1518: No clue. Something for pulling down a garage door?
--riverman
Reply to
humunculus
1516. Indian Push Dagger.
formatting link
Reply to
kfvorwerk
1513 Looks like an ammunition limber. Used to carry ammunition behind a gun carriage on the move.
Reply to
Alexander Thesoso
1518 Lead for a bull. It latches onto a nose ring, letting you lead the animal around by the nose.
Reply to
Bill Marrs
My guesses:
1513 - Obviously a cart of some sort. I'll guess it's half of a set used to transport telephone or telegraph poles around the turn of the (previous) century. The poles themselves formed the body of the vehicle, and animals the motive power. Similar (in the sense of bodyless) trailers/dollies are still sometimes used for telephone poles around here.
1514 - Knife sharpener, the knife blade being drawn lengthwise betwixt the two interlocking ceramic wheels.
1515 - Possibly used to tie off a load; the lowest bit in the photo could be stuck in an oblong hole in a corresponding mounting, and then the toggle turned a quarter turn, and a rope tied to the tee handle portion.
1516 - Folding heavy-duty letter opener, probably not legal to take aboard an airplane these days.
1517 - Barrel sling for hoisting barrels (missing a rope or cable that goes through the clips at the ends of the bows and is held in position by their toggle action)
1518 - Pull handle for some sort of hand truck or cart, perhaps? The teeth that resemble the comb on a chicken's head may engage some steering mechanism on the truck, possibly connected to the back set of wheels.
Now to read other guesses....
Reply to
Andrew Erickson
FWIW, it's a katar--there's even a wikipedia entry for them
formatting link
I've seen one like it somewhere but can't for the life of me recall where.
Reply to
J. Clarke
1516 is an Indian Katar folding dagger. See
formatting link
Regards, Marv
Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
formatting link
Reply to
Marv
1513 has the doubletree and fotboards - if there was a place for the driver to sit, it was on the equipment being towed. I don't think it was an ammunition limber, for those had a chest for the ammunition and the driver(s) sat on the to p of the chest.
1514 I could only guess insulator, but probbly not - the ceramics are too close.
1515 A tool for removing the top of a home-heating oil tank. The "keyed" affair at the bottom was inserted into a matching depression on a flat (flush-fitted) lid and the "Tee" part was the handle. to unscrew the male-threaded plug.
1516 and 1517 will remain until you post answers
1518 Looks kind of like an extension to put on the grate of a coal-fired furnace, to shalke the grate without getting too close to the fire. You probably pull the ring in the handle to open the laych in the eye.
Flash
Reply to
Flash
1513 might be a gatling gun limber?????
Reply to
Steve R.
That's what it looks like to me. If you have a relatively calm or "tame" bull, some people use a rope with a snap, . . . .
BUT . . you use this pole with a cantankerous bull. You can lead him around, and if he takes a notion to charge you, the pole still gives you control, as it will push his head down or off to the side.
Reply to
Nahmie
That's what it looks like to me. If you have a relatively calm or "tame" bull, some people use a rope with a snap, . . . .
BUT . . you use this pole with a cantankerous bull. You can lead him around, and if he takes a notion to charge you, the pole still gives you control, as it will push his head down or off to the side.
-separator- And this one even has little spikes to push against his nose to discourage him coming after you. Kerry
Reply to
Kerry Montgomery
This sure looks right, an awful lot like patent 1,226,201. See:
formatting link
Reply to
Leon Fisk
Good job on finding the patent!! I knew what it was---have one on the farm. Knew it was called a "Bull Staff". But repeated googling only got me a bunch of stuff about Pit Bulls.
Bill
Reply to
Bill Marrs
Still don't know for sure what the unidentified tool is, but the rest of the answers can be seen at this address:
formatting link

Here are two more that were sent to me by people looking to identify them:
A. 3-12" long:
formatting link

B:
formatting link
The owner's description of it:
I found it on a windowsill in my living room. We have bought several things like vacuum cleaner/garmin nav system/phone etc this last year but it doesnt seem to fit anything.
It has four descriptive names/numbers molded on the bottom side---- >POM
Reply to
Rob H.
Looks like an old water key, used with an old style curb box. The pentagonal socket fits the cover bolt. The flats are so you could use a wrench on a rusty bolt and the pick end for prying up the cover or breaking loose crap around the bolt. The hammer end for tapping the cover back into it's recess.
Reply to
Steve W.
NOW I know why it looked so familiar! Its a handle for a coal stove shaker! We had one when I was a kid.
formatting link
--riverman
Reply to
humunculus
O.K. I was too late to dig into this set.
Hmm ... I would like a clearer look at the bottom, but it looks to me as though it has a five-sided hole.
Was that three minus twelve inches long (-9 inches), or perhaps intended to be 3-1/2" (three and one half inches?)
Aside from the size, the five-sided hole looks like what is used on fire hydrants to keep the average wrench from being used on them.
Perhaps it is for access to fire valves in buildings or something similar?
It looks like a strap for keeping some accessory near the equipment with which it is used. The ponted screw goes through the eyelet in the strap, and the thumbscrew holds down the plastic anchor.
[ ... ]
Not exactly a machine screw, but perhaps a self-tapping sheet metal screw.
The thumbscrew.
Thus giving easier access to the knurled edge of the thumbscrew.
Look for something with a color which matches the plastic piece, and the color of the strap.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Here's a little gift for ya, Rob. Go through the pics on this website....I think several of these have come across this site over the years...
formatting link
--riverman
Reply to
humunculus
Wow, that's a lot of wrenches! I'll look through them over the next few days.
Thanks, Rob
Reply to
Rob H.

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.