What is it? Set 467

On Sat, 17 Nov 2012 14:47:51 -0500


The ferrules are slightly different between the two. I wondered at first if they were the same tool or not :)
The latest version seems to have a bit of cloth or something stuck in between the cutter and handle. Might provide some clue if the current owner can't account for it being there...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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On 11/17/12 2:47 PM, Rob H. wrote:

With the handle at that angle, it seems to me it would be awkward to drag along as a scribe. I wonder if it was made to be rocked, perhaps to make a slit at a certain spot.
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Yes, I was also thinking it was for cutting leather but the two outer pieces seem better suited to use with a plank of wood. Though if it is a scribe I don't know why there is a blade and not just a nail-like marker. I just added the leather cutter theory to my answer for this one.
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I don't see why it has two sides. Unless you have very nicely planed wood indeed it's either going to be a bit sloppy or bind on a wide bit. Mortise marker gauges are "one sided" and I can't see why this isn't.
Looking at the photos the guides seem to be round not straight sided - I wonder if they were intended to run in grooves on some sort of jig that's been lost.
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Hey guys,
I may have mentioned before that I want to put wire spoke wheels on a 1/24 scale plastic model of a Morgan 3-Wheeler. The roll of wire supplied in the kit is .0105" (which is in the 29 to 30 wire gage range), quite soft, and is "probably" aluminum. It's kinda greasy and is non-ferrous. It's also a real bitch to try to get the wrapping kinks out and make it straight.
The instructions show that an 18" long cut length of this wire will be "passed" from a point on one "side" to a point diametrically opposite the start point (about .710"), passing alongside the hub (so it's not actually "straight" from one side to the other), then make 90 degree turn, set over about 1/8" and another 90 degree bend to send it back past the "other side" of the hub and to the start side again (one "wrap" will therefore provide 4 spokes from hub to rim) and then continue on until all 18 spokes are in place which will do the whole "face" with one wire, then flip the assembly over and repeat on the other side of the wheel.
This requires a very slight bend each time the wire passes the hub, and two 90 degree bends to complete one pass and move over to the next spoke, with a very sparing glue application. So, the softness is a good idea for the bending, but hard to keep pulled "straight", and even the slightest touch of the mounted wire causes it to bend and look like shit and impossible to fix !!
Anyway, I thought maybe straight pins as used by tailors and seamstresses might work, nice and stiff, cut to length from hub to rim and applied individually, but they are .025" thick, which would work out to be almost a 1/2" thick on the original wheels. So, I'm looking first for the actual known diameter of the spokes of the prototype wire wheels just in case that would be OK, but secondly for something "stiff" and bright like a straight-pin, but closer to 10 or 12 thou thick. Antibody got any ideas or suggestions???
Thanks.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
XXXXXXX XXXXXXXX
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Brian Lawson Inscribed thus:

Its many years since I had a Morgan ! From memory the spokes were a tad over 3/16" and were chromed. You mentioned 18 spokes, I seem to recall there were 24.

HTH
--
Best Regards:
Baron.
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wrote:

Brian, I don't have any info for you, but your thread reminds me of the car I cut my wrenchin' teeth on, Dad's old Austin Healy 100-4. I tuned his spoked wheels as my first automotive task, then helped him tune the engine up (mostly watching) for the next weekend's autocross or gymkhana. Fond old memories. I think I was 7.
--
Every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are
based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that
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On Tue, 20 Nov 2012 22:07:02 -0800, Larry Jaques

Hey Larry,
Very good memories to have !! At 7 for me in 1947, it was soldiers and "the enemy". Lots of fun then. I didn't get into working on cars until the early '50's.
Brian. XXXXXXXX
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wrote:

Hey Baron,
Certainly it does help !
This is a Wills "FINECAST" kit, made in England, and they have provided "notches" for 18 spokes per side, so a total of 36 per wheel, which seems reasonable for a wheel this size, but I wouldn't know the proper count. It is a model of a 1934 Morgan, and it's not mine. The owner appears to have made an attempt that looks not to have gone very well, but he didn't mention that to me. I kinda figured that the prototype spokes would be somewhere in the 3/16 to 1/4 range, so thanks for a confirmation.
Take care, and thanks again.
Brian Lawson
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Brian Lawson wrote:

I just checked with my neighbour and his Morgan model has 40 spokes per wheel. It's a model of a 1929 Grand Prix Morgan he used to own for many years though and he said by 1934 they had introduced interchangeable wheels so maybe different.
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Hey David,
OK...thanks. the "best" photo I have looks like it has 40 spokes too. I've ordered some 10 thou straight pins to try out, and they should be here some time next week. I'll lay it out to 40 with them and see how it looks, but I think putting 40 in this small wheel will make it look "solid".
Take care.
Brian. XXXXXXXXX
Brian. ed, 21 Nov 2012 14:52:42 +0000, David Billington

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Hi Brian,
Brian Lawson Inscribed thus:

Your comment make me wonder if there were variations in wheels, sizes and spoke numbers, across the various models. Some were built for hill climb events and I'm sure would be different.
--
Best Regards:
Baron.
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Tinned copper or brass wire might work for you. The copper is an electrical item, the brass is for making jewelry. If you stretch it until you feel it give slightly it will straighten perfectly and harden.
A street-artist jeweler in Heidelberg showed me how to make these from plated wire with just my fingers:
http://image2.fmgstatic.com/grafx/9a7s_finished.jpg
jsw
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Hey Jim,
OK..thanks....I'll give it a try !!
Brian Lawson.
ps...what is the wire size for the coils you did?
XXXXXXXXXXXXX
On Tue, 20 Nov 2012 19:04:40 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

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You expect me to remember that much detail from 1972? It might have been around 20 or 22 gauge, but of course in Germany it was metric. I had more fun forming sheet silver and brass into decorated spheres in the well-supplied Army crafts shop. http://www.nancylthamilton.com/tools/metal-working-tools/
Once I got wheels though I spent every spare hour exploring the country. jsw
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On 21/11/2012 5:06 AM, Brian Lawson wrote:

Perhaps look at stainless fishing trace wire (not the multi-strand stuff).
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On 11/21/2012 5:26 PM, Spuckle wrote:

my morgan doesn't have wire wheels, but from my recollection of the ones that did, the actual spoke diameter was about 1/4 inch, maybe 3/16.
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All the Best, and a Happy New Year.
Brian Lawson, With a White Christmas !!! in Bothwell, Ontario
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Brian Lawson wrote:

I'll see your 'Merry Christmas' and raise you a 'Blessed Christmas'. :-)
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On Mon, 24 Dec 2012 17:27:42 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

Probably should be "Happy Birthday".     To the Christians, anyway.         :-)
--
Cheers,
John B.
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