Chopsaw blade on a tablesaw?

I need to cut a lot of 16 ga., and so thought I would put the tablesaw to work with a chopsaw blade. It didn't seem such an awful idea, but I sure
wasn't ready for the spark show. Thought I would take a break and see if prevailing wisdom has a commonsense reason why this is a bad thing to do. The fire extinguisher is close at hand...
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a recent project, cutting up some grating, didn't want to use O/A torch, too cheap to buy a dry cut saw, just bought a dry cut saw blade (milwaukee 10" from amazon.com) put it on my table saw (rpm's were substantially lower than my circular saw). worked, what for me was, OK. i use a sliding plywood miter box on top of the tablesaw bed. one thing though, with grating, towards the end of the cut the already cut pieces could/would pinch the blade, which sucked, i broke/chipped a few (BRAND NEW) teeth that way. dry cut blade was more expensive i'd imagine than an abrasive cut off saw blade, less sparks though i'd imagine. don't know if you can cut sheet metal with it though, i'd guess you'd have to feed it slowly but more importantly very steadily.
b.w.
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The cutting action is OK, as far as that goes. I just can't get a straight cut out of it. And I don't know why I'm surprised it makes that burnt-grinding smell. (The woodshop is in the basement; the metal shop is in the garage, for that very reason.) Planning and daydreaming sometimes leaves out the details of the other senses, I guess.
The price for the abrasive blade is right: $4 and some change. Run-out and warp is what you'd expect for that: god awful. About .030 warp on the face, and front to back is out .010 mil. (That is kinda weird. I dialled in the trunnions and a Forrest blade to just about 1 mil not that long ago. It's the blade, not the arbor.)
The size of the work doesn't lend itself to clamping to the plywood sled, and I can't find a 1/2 bolt this moment to clamp things to the miter gauge. I'm glad to call it quits. Should maybe think about getting a shear and press brake for this kind of work. It's a simple job if you have the tools for it.
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Better figure in the cost of new bearings for your table saw. Ask me how I know.
Chuck P.
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Mike

Hmmm. It sure does vibrate quite a bit. Is that what you're talking about?
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Nope, abrasive dust really kills the bearings.
Be sure to clean out the sawdust before doing this again. You do not want to mix sawdust and hot sparks, it can smolder for hours.
Mike Young wrote:

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Mike Young wrote:

The table saw will work fine, but you need a Tennyru style blade (C6 carbide). You can get a 7 1/4" Matshushita for $35 from Medford Tool: http://www.medfordtools.com/matsushita/steelcutters.html
It will fly through 16 ga & the cut will be clean and straight. Yeah, kinda noisy and the chips are VERY hot. I have a small dedicated TS with one of these blades, just for steel.
Bob
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