chuck for a speeder socket wrench

Is there a chuck that will fit on a speeder wrench to make it a de facto bit and brace? B and B's are hard to come by, was trying to see if I
could make one of my speeders do double duty. Helpful when working on fence posts way out in the pasture away from a drop cord, and don't need recharging.
Tim
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t wrote:

What about one of these? http://www.atomindustries.com.au/chainsaw.html
Tom
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Interesting

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For auger bits why not try http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid 947088000&tab=spe#tablink?
They also make a 3/8" drive variant for 1/3 the price of their 1/2" drive item.
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Couple of suggestions.... Get an adapter for your speeder wrench and weld the chuck to the adapter so you can just pop on the chuck when you need it... that way you still have the speeder wrench for other uses. Secondly, go to some of your local "yard sales" and you probably will find a brace laying on the table for a buck or two. They are very expensive if bought new. Ken.
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Old B&B's are as common as dirt at yard sales. They usually go for less than $5. I think you would find that the speed wrench doesn't have quite the torque or hand fit for doing much boring. Bugs
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not a bad idea.
i've been digging the bins at auction and antique houses, but most of the braces are broken, haven't found any good ones, and the Scot in me won't let me pay for a new one...

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All you need is the chuck that accepts the tang on an auger bit. Saw off the rest and weld a socket on it that will accept your speeder.
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I have a small chuck that has a 1/4" hex stub on the back of it. It looks like it was made to plug into one of those quick-change drill bit holders. It's only a 1/4" chuck, so probably smaller than what you had in mind. It's marked "Jacobs MULTI-CRAFT USA". I've never used it for anything.
You could probably have someone make an adapter that would fit a regular chuck, but I agree with the guy who said a speeder handle might not take as much torque as you'd like-- the ones I've seen are made for speed, not torque.
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t wrote:

facto
I
on
need
see: http://www.garrettwade.com/jump.jsp?lGen tail&itemID6391&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainCat000&iSubCat036&iProductID6391
You might have to cut and paste
Was plastered on the back of a new catalog. As far as braces are concerned, both the local Ace and True Value still have them, with plastic furniture they were like $15. The bits are what costs. My dad used them all the time for boring holes in walls for running house electrical wiring and conduits, he claimed that it was a lot safer than power drilling since he could stop immediately when he hit a pipe or wire in the wall. With the proper bit, you could hook the wire through a hole in the bit and fish it back through, too. Have a couple of those, still.
Stan
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Haven't checked for quite a while, but the *last* new brace I purchased (good one, too) was about $48US. Ball bearings and all. Ken.
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