Clausing 5914 Questions



Just a bit of FYI -- I was able to do the entire job without having to hire anyone, using my HF engine hoist. My lathe was crated and delivered by truck freight, and dropped off in front of my shop via truck liftgate (that was the moderately dicey part).Your situation may be entirely different, but this machine is relatively small and lightweight compared to something that really requires a rigging team. You could probably do the moving yourself (with a friend), a sheet or two of 3/4" plywood for rolling surface if needed, and a couple of furniture dollies, with an engine hoist to do the lifting. It's an opportunity to buy more equipment...:-) I have some pictures I could send you if you have further interest.
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In article

I did the Millrite myself (with the considerable help of the seller, Steve Smith), but this time I have the names of some good riggers (versus trying to pick names from the yellow pages like the last time). So, first, I'll get quotes from the riggers. Tomorrow.
Joe Gwinn
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Joseph Gwinn wrote:

If I were moving a 5914 right now I would bolt a 4 foot long board to the left front and left rear feet of the lathe. That would give it a broader base and keep it from tipping over to the front or rear. Once it starts to go over, 1200 pounds can bruise the shoulder trying to stop it. I know.
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Given the time pressure, both the seller's and mine, and the weather, I will just hire a rigger this time. But I do see how one could move this lathe by oneself.
Joe Gwinn
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Joe,
When I bought my 5914 the guy I bought it from could load it into a pickup.
To get it off the truck here at home, I got a 2 ton nylon strap, made a sling around the spindle and around the end of the bed, and got a tow truck to lift it and set it on some Harbor Freight furniture dollies, and rolled it into my shop, used an engine hoist to lift and drop it on the floor.. Strap cost $20, Tow truck cost $50, dollies cost $20... Gave a friend a sixpack for use of the hoist :-)
If indeed it's in good shape you'll love it. :-) And if it didn't come with a Royal collet closer, go get one.
--.- Dave
wrote:

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    Mine (5418 with a bed turret) came via a high flatbed truck (bolted to a large pallet), and I had made a ramp of five 10' 2x4s bolted edge up to three lengths of pressure-treated decking board. That was used to slide it down from the flatbed into my 3/4 ton pickup in the driveway -- over the tailgate, headstock towards the cab. It was then tied to the corner anchors at the front of the pickup's bed. I then drove it up the driveway, and backed up to the shop (ex garage) door. I jacked up the rear end of the ramp so I could open the tailgate and unhook the stays so it would swing below the angle which the ramp would take, and then pulled the ramp and lathe back towards the end of the bed. Once near there, I ran some mountain climbing rope from one corner of the truck bed, around the base of the lathe pedestal, back to the other corner and three turns around a carabiner clipped to that corner, and into the hads of my wife to pay out a little at a time. With the help of a friend, I slid the ramp down until the end touched the floor, then slid the lathe and pallet down until it was almost off the ramp. I used a floor jack to lift the ramp enough so that I could drive the pickup out from under the end of the ramp. I then lowered it in stages with the aid of cribbing until I could leave it stable and close the door to the shop.
    The next day, I used a borrowed hydraulic engine hoist to lift it (via a loop of web strap under both ends of the chip pan right against the pedestal cabinets) and remove it from the pallet. (I tied off the webbing at a stable balance point, so it did not suddenly go headstock down.)
    Once the pallet was removed, I set the lathe down on cribbing (2x4s and 4x4s) (since otherwise it would be resting on the legs of the engine hoist), removed the hoist, and lowered each end a bit at a time until it was on the floor.

    Mine came with a lever-style collet closer -- but with no maker's name visible. I later had to extend the drawtube when I swapped out the original 2-1/4x8 nose spindle and replaced it with an L-00 spindle. And of *course* it came with the closer, since it also came with a bed turret and no normal tailstock.
    It has been an excellent lathe since I got it (and presumably was one before I got it, too. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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