compressed-air drills

SWMBO wants me to build a small deck. Of course, every new project requires a new tool, right? And my trusty Bosch cordless drill is showing its age a bit,
or to be more precise, the batteries are showing their age -- building a deck, I'll definitely drain the batteries in much less time than it takes to recharge them.
So I'm looking at other options, including compressed air drills (e.g. saw one at the Borg this evening for $45 or so). But I got to wondering... almost every cordless drill has a multi-position clutch to prevent overtightening, or sinking screws too deep. Does anybody make an air drill with such a clutch?
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You cannot build a deck with a battery powered drill.
Air drills do not have the torque. (in my experience).
I do have some compressed air screwdrivers, however. (all name brands, used)
If it was up to me, I would use a decent variable speed electric drill, but I would love to sell you a pneumatic screwdriver (straight or gun shaped).
i
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Ignoramus16466 wrote:

Well, you can, but a battery powered impact driver works a lot better.
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Good point I missed in my previous post because I was using a drill and driver for the the deck I just finished. You have to be careful not to bury the screw, but my impact driver is actually easier to control than either my corded or battery drill motors, and is less likely to twist your wrist as you get fatigued. It runs quite a while on a charge too. All of my cordless are 14.4V Makita's
BTW, and MOST IMPORTANT - an impact driver does qualify as a NEW TOOL.
Basic criteria of your OP
RonB
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Pete C. wrote:

Agreed. Air tools have their place but building a deck is not necessarily one of them. I wouldn't use my air drill to build a deck.
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It's a small deck, only about 140 square feet.

Thanks, that's useful to know.

Yeah, that's Plan B -- I have a good one already (Makita 1/2" VSR corded), but it doesn't have a clutch...
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On Sat, 22 May 2010 22:35:34 -0500, Ignoramus16466

Why? I've done it (well, I used a hammer too). A decent cordless drill will easily sink any screw you're likely to use in a deck. An Impactor will do it without stripping the heads. ;-) An extra set of batteries makes things easier, but I did it with two sets of two, with my older 9.6V Makita as the drill and a 14.4V PC to sink the screws.

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wrote:

The 700 sq-ft deck that I couldn't build with a cordless drill* is still looking just fine after 9 years now. Art * 14.4V PC
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wrote:

1. - nonsense RE torque of pneumatic drills - there are more than one type, some are geared, some are not - the high speed ones don't have a lot of torque (and at 30,000 RPM, aren't too good as screwdrivers either), but the ones that are suitably geared down have plenty of torque for drilling in any wood I've encountered..
2. with a simple T, you can have a pneumatic drill and a pneumatic screwdriver
3. pneumatic tools don't get hot when they run, that's a real plus if you are using them a lot
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Bill Noble wrote:

No kidding - just hold the tool so that your hand is near the exhaust port - a quick way to realize how cold expanding compressed air can really get...
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On Sun, 23 May 2010 21:11:15 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

The low torque is great when drilling with an pneumatic in thin metal, at least my wrists think so when it binds.
Mark
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On Sat, 22 May 2010 22:35:34 -0500, Ignoramus16466

I agree on all of Iggys points about tools, though some of the newest cordless drills come pretty close to being suitable.
Gunner
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I drove over 2000 screws with a cheap off-brand cordless 14.4 v drill when I built my deck.
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On Sun, 23 May 2010 10:47:22 -0600, Dave Balderstone

I drove 700 or so in the deck then another 2000 in the floor of my house, with my 14.4V PC. I did have one of the packs rebuilt ($35) after the 2000.
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On Sun, 23 May 2010 10:47:22 -0600, Dave Balderstone

Good on you lad!
I managed to drive 10 with a brand new one 4 weeks ago.
Gunner
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Iggy, I have at least 8 maybe more air drills and at least that many air screw drivers. Most I have bought surplus from Reliable tools on eBay. It is very necessary to use the air drill that is correct for the job. There are vast speed differences between them, some of which have wrist breaking torque. The biggest risk is to use a drill that is too fast for the job and burning up the bit. In wood, this is not a concern. I really like the air drivers much better than electric. Steve
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I have built many decks with battery operated drills. Two units comes in handy with several fast charge batteries for each.
Oh yeah! Those were the drills with the old ni-cad batteries that were 9V units then.
Torque clutches do **NOT*** set screw depth. Torque sets the torque. When you hit hard wood spots you will be adjusting the torque setting. When you hit soft wood spots you will over sink them. Just get used to the sound of the right screw depth or use a dimpler attachment.
You cannot build a deck with a battery powered drill.
Air drills do not have the torque. (in my experience).
I do have some compressed air screwdrivers, however. (all name brands, used)
If it was up to me, I would use a decent variable speed electric drill, but I would love to sell you a pneumatic screwdriver (straight or gun shaped).
i
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On May 22, 11:35pm, Ignoramus16466 <ignoramus16...@NOSPAM. 16466.invalid> wrote:

...
I built these with an old 9.6V Makita: http://picasaweb.google.com/KB1DAL/Firewood#5287788504883032706
It will barely drive a #10 x 3" screw without predrilling, but it drills up to 3/8" holes in dry oak nicely, for the lag screws or Timberlocks. I needed a corded Milwaukee only for the 1/2" lags that fasten the cross beams onto the oak log posts.
Last year I helped a contractor with a volunteer deck project. He used an 18V DeWalt to drive the Timberlocks.
jsw
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wrote:

Predrilling
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Yep. I use a lot of oak for framing temporary sheds like in the photos. If I don't predrill the lag screws break off when I remove them later. I salvaged the oak beams from pallets for kitchen counter sheets and use them for rafters. The wood is almost as hard as 1980's Chinese cast iron.
jsw
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