Crane operator license

I am thinking about buying an all terrain crane and I am confused about whether its operator need to be licensed or certified, or both.
OSHA seems to have strict requirements for cranes used in construction, but I do not do construction. What I do (machine moving and removal) is called "general industry".
Does anyone here own a crane or have a good idea on this?
i
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Ignoramus11174 wrote:

http://cranes101.com/_illinois.php
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Steve W.

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No, it is all terrain, not a street vehicle.
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On Thu, 25 Jun 2015 19:28:27 -0500, Ignoramus19964

You got screwed. That thing really needs paint. ;)
So, what did you learn about the licensing and such for personal use?
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wrote:

A retired friend pays the commercial registration fee for his heavy-duty pickup truck, though I doubt Iggy could claim the crane as his personal car.
I've thought about buying a used bucket van for personal use. http://highperformancecrew.com/showthread.php?7841-GMC-Bucket-Van "Asking Price: $ 4850.00"
-jsw
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On Fri, 26 Jun 2015 07:15:59 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

I've had the same thoughts myself. Why a van? Hell to navigate.
They turn up all the time on eBay. Some (a small fleet) '05 1T GMC/Altec bucket trucks went for $5-7k a few years ago, when I was looking. They were probably gas, though. I have no idea how clapped out a truck can get in service for a decade, either.
They'd be handy as a shop crane, too. Pop the man bucket off and...
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wrote:

I know they aren't practical, but I do have a use right now. A neighbor and I hired a tree service with a crane to take down mature, branch-shedding oaks leaning ominously toward our houses. They left the trunks of mine in a jumble so I could salvage the crooked firewood and straight sawmill lumber; these trees originally grew straight without large lower branches in a forest. Now I have a heap of wet logs 16" to 20" in diameter and up to 25' long to rearrange into a neat covered stack, cribbed up off the ground and all on my property, by myself.
I designed my lifting gear to move 8', 1000 Lb sections and this severely strains some parts of it, though the A frame posts should support 4700 lbs apiece, assuming they are 25000 lb yield scrap steel, or 5400 if A36. My 5000 Lb crane scale appears to be cracking as it won't return to zero, so I bought another one. Fortunately Chinese ones are fairly cheap if you don't need certifiable accuracy, just comparison to a proof test load.
I've spent more time repairing and modifying the equipment and designing the post-and-beam sheds I'll make from the logs, to cut them to manageable lengths without waste, than moving the wood. This is what those trolley wheels are for.
-jsw
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On Fri, 26 Jun 2015 09:53:19 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Shouldn't take long, with one under each arm. Are you wanting to mill them into long sticks, or could you saw some down to size to facilitate their movement? (Never mind, I just read the next para)

I couldn't have afforded nearly the amount of gear I have bought had I been restrained to brands such as Fluke, Starrett, SnapOn, Milwaukee, etc. Chiwanese stuff does just fine for many, many things.

Oh, cool! Timber framing can be tremendously beautiful, strong, and efficient. Have you built a hydraulic peavey yet? Are you using a manual timber boring machine and chisels, or a chainsaw-based mortiser?
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wrote:

I'm not a purist on rough sheds. The ones I previously built from tree trunks are lag-screwed together, their pressure treated timbers are attached with small screws in metal plates to minimize damage if/when I reuse them elsewhere. The sheds will be largely a place to store the wood, like in closely spaced 6x6 rafters. -jsw
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On Fri, 26 Jun 2015 07:15:59 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

There's no chick you couldn't pick up with a vehicle like that!
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wrote:

Would you pick up chicks who required a crane?
I might consider one who knew how to operate it. She'd be unlikely to spend my money on Manolo Blahniks, though maybe on Red Wings.
-jsw
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On Fri, 26 Jun 2015 11:24:36 -0400, Spehro Pefhany

from my radar, duuuuude. (Ewwwwwwwwwwwwwww!)
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This is an all terrain crane, it is not street legal and needs to be transported on a low boy semi trailer.

nice if you can make money with it
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On 06/26/2015 12:02 PM, Ignoramus23199 wrote:

I picked up an old JLG 40H manlift 10 or 12 year ago for $5K off eBay (also happened to have been located in Chicago area altho it was a rental turn-in and the broker/seller was in FL). It's been _extremely_ handy around the place altho I got it when was getting started with reroofing the old barn not long after we had come back to the farm...it had the advantage or any of the bucket trucks I've seen of the larger basket that allowed hired hand and I to be able to load up w/ shingle bundles (went back w/ cedar shakes rather than convert the open-slat roof to solid to maintain original character) and still be able to get both of us in there....that would be enough to keep us going until we needed a ground break and saved schlepping them up and finding/making storage platforms on the roof. The disadvantage comparatively is its weight (12000 lb) and less maneuverability and not being "roadable" but for use just around the farm place that's not a real restriction. Now that I've had it, it's been handy enough for many other tasks I'd really miss it if it weren't around.
It needed some maintenance for some leaking cylinder seals here a couple months ago and I looked some with the idea given its age of maybe just finding a newer one instead but in a short window nothing came online that wasn't quite a lot more expensive. I'm sure if one didn't have a time frame deadline and kept watching bargains are there periodically still. There was on 60-ft that was "almost" but I decided to spend the money on this one at least one more time before finally retiring it...
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One of the guys who does maintenance for me, knows how to rebuild cylinders. It is not difficult.
i
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On 06/26/2015 6:37 PM, Ignoramus23199 wrote: ...

_Rebuilding_ the cylinder is pretty much trivial, yes; getting the main lift and level cylinders out _to_ rebuild is a major effort.
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It would be easy with a crane, but ................
The cylinder rebuilding shop where I get my scrap steel cutoffs has a rack of large telescoping tubing to make such cylinders. It might be useful to get to know a shop where you are.
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On 06/26/2015 8:19 PM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

W/ working farm I know the hydraulics folks in town _quite_ well... :)
I don't have the facilities to handle these larger cylinders, though...the "extend" is almost 20' single stroke 2=1/2" bore; the main lift isn't huge but need enough shop area to support the boom and crane to lift and extract horizontal as it is enclosed inside the boom and has to come out lengthwise; I have neither of sufficient capacity.
I took it (well, actually, they sent the float to take it to their shop) to the Deere shop in town; they ended up unable to get the end caps off the main lift and took it to the hydraulic shop. He needed most of a day to finally get it apart to replace the seals....
Turned out it also was a major effort to remove the link pins for the main lift cylinder as well...after almost 30 years (its an '88 model lift) they had "growed" in place and were buggers to drive out. The much smaller slave lift (one that keeps the basket level with varying boom height) wasn't that bad; if it were only it I might have tried it but figure wasn't any point in doing one w/o the other given the age; if the slave was already leaking it wouldn't be long before the master also began.
Meanwhile, the seal kits were only $40/ea or thereabouts.
I'm not at all upset over the shop charges; it's part of having such. I can and do deal with most routine stuff, but that one is beyond what I've the capacity to handle and have other things that need doing anyway...
PS. After it was finished, loaned the lift to a local non-profit riding stable that works with developmentally-challenged kids so they could work over the tension rods holding the frame of their arena (it's one of the soft-cover over metal support type). The Deere dealer contributed the haul over to their place and will go pick it up and deliver it home when they're finished...
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Pretty easy if you have a crane to help!
i
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