Custom taps and dies


Hi everybody,
Does anyone in this NG make custom taps and dies? My cousin ( a
millwright) is looking for some odd-ball taps and dies for work. He
isn't computer literate, which is why I got tasked with searching
online :)
Cheers,
CVC
Reply to
Charles V. Craig
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Oddball..., as in shape? Thread? Material? JR Dweller in te cellar
Charles V. Craig wrote:
Reply to
JR North
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
I made a "W-48" form tap yesterday. Does that qualify as obb-ball?
There are many places that make custom taps. I haven't looked, but will in the future. I don't believe they are too expensive.
Reply to
Gary A. Gorgen
Hmmmnnn . . . you'd think a millwright, or a millwright's relative would have a better description than "oddball". Justgoestoshowya, he thinks we are not only magicians, but mind readers as well.
Bob Swinney
PS: FWIW taps can be made by anyone with a screw cutting lathe and some drill rod. Dies are a little more complicated, but doable. It's a "chicken and egg" thing. First you make the tap and then use the tap to make the die, etc.
Reply to
Robert Swinney
OoPPs, sorry for the triple post. My PC has a screw in it I made the tap for.
Bob Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
To be honest, I would expect a millwright to know how to make one-off taps and dies as a matter of course.
For taps:- Take tool steel of choice. Starting with square section makes life easier. Turn desired thread on it. Turn a pilot and/or taper. Cut flutes using a mill or shaper (I used a shaper) then harden steel or harden steel then cut flutes with a surface grinder.
For crude dies:- Take tool steel of choice. Drill holes to make flutes. Bore hole for core diameter. Boring a pilot can help with alignment. Tap or single point thread. Turn taper with cross-slide. Harden.
It works.
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
The M32 * 1.5 (they don't list 1.25) costs (sit down) 147.- EUR. That are about $180. Oh, there's a cheaper one for 85.- EUR. The die costs 75.- EUR.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Müller
In this part of the world anyway, the term Millwright can mean either:
1) Someone who is not only a fully qualified and trained machinist in the sense of lathe/mill etc operator, but also trained to set up, align, and probably recondition and repair machine tools, or
2) Someone who may never have had formal training or any/much experience as a machine tool operator or any of the theory needed to be a machinist, but who installs, sets up, and adjusts drive trains, belts motors pullys, etc for saw mills and other such industiral equipment.
Same term, but hardly the same skill set.
Mickey
Reply to
Mickey Feldman
Holy crap, I don't think he's gonna like that :)
Thank you, Nick. I'll pass that along.
Cheers,
CVC
Reply to
Charles V. Craig

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