Cutting 4"x 4" x 1/4" square tubing

I have a one time job of making about 100 cuts in some 1/4" wall 4 " square
tubing and some W8X15"s. Any suggestions on tools. I have sort of ruled
out 14" chop saws. I am thinking of buying a horizontal bandsaw. Any
suggestions on what equipment to use.
Thank You,
Rick
Reply to
rbell
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bought a fully auto cold saw 11 years ago. can't even count the money it has made me. Mine is for ALuminum, but principle applies regardless. No squaring or milling to length, +- .005 is easily done. Don't even own a horizontal bandsaw
rbell wrote:
Reply to
yourname
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-- try a 4x6" bandsaw, it's worked for countless others!
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
I agree, but 100 cuts will take a long time. You can add coolant flow to speed things up. You would want a more coarse blade than what comes with them. I think 6-8 TPI would be about right. Might be worthwhile going to one size larger and get a better saw if it will cut faster.
Grant Erw> >> I have a one time job of making about 100 cuts in some 1/4" wall 4 " >> square >> tubing and some W8X15"s. Any suggestions on tools. I have sort of ruled >> out 14" chop saws. I am thinking of buying a horizontal bandsaw. Any >> suggestions on what equipment to use. > > >
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Reply to
Rex B
The band saws are very good, and don't make much noise but they are slow. Plan on other work while it cuts..
Reply to
Waynemak
For 1/4" wall tubing the correct blade (3 teeth in the cut) has 12 tpi. I might go down to 10 tpi. And buy a carbon steel blade, a good one, don't spend the money on bimetal for 100 cuts on a one-off job. Bimetal blades are just great but teeth strip off sometimes.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
We need more info to give you a really good suggestion.
Why have you ruled out an abrasive chop saw? Too much heat, noise, dust, etc.? If it was me and I had the choice, I would choose an abrasive chop saw. They're fast and you get very little burr.
You can also get a dry cut saw with a carbide-tipped blade. The initial cost is fairly significant (maybe $500) but one blade would probably last your run.
A cold saw would be ideal but they're lots of money. A new blade will just drop through your material.
A bandsaw would certainly work, but there is virtually no automation available at a reasonable cost and they are pretty slow. Cut to cut times could be something like 2-5min and the parts would have burrs and sharp edges.
There are automated saws (bandsaws, cold cut saws, etc.) made for this type of work. Frequently these machines will deburr the part as well. I'm not sure if you're making money on this deal, but farming it out may be a good idea.
So, do you have a solution already, or can you provide us with more info?
Regards,
Robin
Reply to
Robin S.
It might be more cost effective to order your material precut. Locally one very competitive supplier of wide flange material optimizes cuts when cutting for many different customers. There is no charge for cutting. You will need a good quality saw to be cutting 8 inch wide flange. It will cost you several thousand to get something that will do the job properly. Randy
Reply to
Randy Zimmerman
I would use a bandsaw, you might consider a 7x12 horizontal, you might be able to lay two or threee rows side by side of the 4x4 tubing thereby cutting two pieces at once. Plus the horizontal bandsaw will run unattended for each cut, freeing you or your operator to do other work.
Chop saws are for woodworkers who are machinist wannabe's.
Reply to
Tony
But since it's tubing, you actually are looking at 1/2" cuts, and even more during a significant part of it as it cuts the top and bottom. I think a coarser TPI would work fine and cut much faster.
Reply to
Rex B
What Randy said. If you have any length at all to these parts, you are talking about a LOT of steel. Suppliers will pretty much cut that up for a very resonable charge. A few years back, I was quoted $.30 a cut to precut some 2"x3" ROPS material when I bought big quantities.
Randy Zimmerman wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
You're joking, right?
Regards,
Robin
Reply to
Robin S.
I cut square tube with one corner up, diamond shape when viewed from the end. I also cut angle with the opening facing one jaw of the vise. It seems to speed up the cut considerably.
Cheers,
Kelley
Reply to
Kelley Mascher
ut, freeing you or your operator to do other work.
yeah, try cutting 4] 1/2 x4 lengths of 6061 into 5 inch pieces in 10 minutes with a bandsaw
Reply to
yourname
Are you counting the sweepup time afterwards for all that swarf? :-)
Bandsaws are much cleaner and quieter; also smaller chop saws don't work very well on larger solid stock. The smaller chop saws were designed for steel 2x4 studs they use in new construction, *not* for cutting e.g. 1" solid square steel bar. I tried once and the blade cut down about halfway and then would simply go no further. There had been a ball bearing or something in the steel before it went to Asia to be remelted and the intense heat of the grinding cut hardened it white hard locally. I showed this half cut to a few guys all of whom were amazed. Wouldn't happen with aluminum, of course. I'll take slower, quieter, less messy and more precise every time in my little home shop.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Abrasive chop saws go through virtually anything metal. This includes hardened steel like "Thompson rod", tool steel punches/die inserts, lathe tool bits, and endmills as well as aluminium, brass, copper, etc.
While I wouldn't want to cut a 4" square bar, 1" square is no problem.
I can understand someone inside their home not wanting to run one of these as they are indeed very loud and create a fair amount of dust. However, when you're getting paid for your work (as the original poster is, and others within this group are), you don't always have the luxury of using a process which is not the most efficient available.
At work we have (automatic) bandsaws, power hacksaws, abrasive chop saws, cold saws, hacksaws, chisels, etc. They are each used as it is appropriate.
Regards,
Robin
Reply to
Robin S.
No
Woodworkers like chops saws because they are similar to their power miter box.
Reply to
Tony
I don't think any other tool in metal working will match the efficiency of the bandsaw when it comes to cutting stock.
You can stack multiple pices of bar stock in the vise of a bandsaw and let it run automatically.
Reply to
Tony
Common abrasive chop saws have very limited miter and no bevel capability. I would say cold saws are more simlar to miter saws than abrasive chop saws are.
But that's beside the point. Professional metalworking is about efficiency, or at least *most* professional metalworking. If an abrasive chop saw is the most efficient cutting method which satisfies the requirements of the part, then it is used.
Woodworkers use drill presses, drill bits, chisels, squares, etc., etc., etc., which closely resemble (or are identical to) the tools metalworkers use. Shall we all start interpolating all holes with endmills on VMCs simply because woodworkers do not?
Regards,
Robin
Reply to
Robin S.
I use my chop saw for Hard steel, my band saw for the rest. Many chop saw wheels will NOT cut aluminum worth a dam. Its also way to cold outside for me to want to cut a bunch of steel with my chop saw, and theres no way I want all the grit on my machine tools. The whole filling my shop with grit and sparks is not on my list of things to do. The chop saw stays in the garage. I can clean tools, eat, drink beer, go relieve some beer, hell maybe post to this group while my band saw does the work.
Reply to
Waynemak

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