cutting HSS blanks

what is to best way to cut HSS blanks so you can save the maximum amount of material and flexible shapes. and how do you drill into HSS?
i want to make knives and also bowl gouges for wood turning. ~Bezalel
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First of all, is your HSS material hardened or annealed?
If hard you have very little choice, but hard work ahead of you!
If annealed you can cut with band saw and drill at reduced speed (40 - 50 fpm) using high speed steel drills and cutting oil, followed by filing and belt sanding.
In the hardened condition the only way to work the steel is by wire EDM and grinding. It might be worthwhile to have it annealed in that case.
You should be aware that HSS is not a good steel to make knives from. For wood turning gouges it is fine.
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what would be better for knives? and after its annealed and shaped can it be hardened easily?
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buy some blanks, they are preformed, you grind them how you want them....
xman
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On 26 Dec 2005 09:03:25 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

OCS, or OMS
(old Chevy springs, or old Mercedes springs..which are the prefered material for the Napales Kukri knife)
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
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You take one lousy week off to join Thorax at the Elvis concert, and this
2005 18:21:06 GMT in rec.crafts.metalworking :

    I've got a tip of one of those, makes a fine wedge to pry vises off milling tables...
Peter
--
pyotr filipivich.
as an explaination for the decline in the US's tech edge, James
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Tue, 27 Dec 2005 18:27:39 GMT, pyotr filipivich

I have a modest collection of very old Kukris, and in fact, carry one in both the truck at all times in my BOB (current military issue, not a paki version) and have a sheath for one of the smaller "social" ones, (pre 1900, interesting steel) that counterbalances the 1911 in my "serious business" shoulder holster.
Im very much a fan of Kukris, and as Im sure you are aware..<G> I have a serious view of knives and own several.
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
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There are some knife people here who probably will direct you to good knife sites, where there is a lot of good information about steels, mixed in with some misinformation. In general, the serious knifemakers have a pretty deep knowledge about steels and a lot of practical information.
It should be pointed out that some good knifemakers think highly of using HSS for knives, particularly for thick-bodied ones. It holds an edge really well although it is not easy to sharpen to a fine edge.
As for heat-treating it to re-harden: you can re-harden it without big trouble. However, hardening it back into true high-speed steel, with red hardness, requires some knowledge and good temperature control -- more than most home-shop heat-treating operations can really muster.
Hardening is a process you can do in one continuous step: heat, quench, temper. Achieving red hardness is a two-step process. Without the second step, you'll have hard steel but it won't hold its hardness up into the red range (around 1,000 deg. F, plus or minus depending on the grade of steel).
I haven't done any serious wood turning but I'd be surprised if red hardness is a big issue. May be, but I'd think you could get good performance from your tools without it.
-- Ed Huntress
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A lot of the wood in wood turning contains more silicon than one can figure. Some woods - dull carbide. The exotic woods - various 'hearts' - Purple, Green, Red are tough. The woods draw up the dissolved silicon (from sand - SiO2) and build structures within. Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
Ed Huntress wrote:

-
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figure.
Green, Red

build
Well, what do you think -- does he need red hardness? He'll get the best wear resistance you can get with steel, using HSS with or without red hardness. But will the tool get hot enough to require it?
-- Ed Huntress
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It's best not to shell or edge harden - as re-sharpening is a constant bit of fun. Should be the whole end - and then hand grind as needed. Wheel grinding should be done with a cool chip off wheel. White or Pink - those that chip as they grind and re-make sharp points - but the chips carry off some heat. Work slow.
The nasty bit - a nice 80 point 10" blade of carbide - now like a butter knife. But now they are starting to use Steel grade Carbide on wood tools and it is lasting better.
Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
Ed Huntress wrote:

-
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Get a few back issues of Knives Illustrated and read all about the various alloys. Also, there are ads from knifemaker supply houses.
Joe Gwinn
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