Dan Mig info?

While visiting a customer today, he noticed the big assed Hobart in my
trailer (I was on my way home up north). After telling him about it
and blushingly mentioning my spare tire episode, he snapped his
fingers and motioned me to follow him. In one of the back storage
areas, was a mig welder with bottle and a huge spool of wire.
He told me he had used it for years doing car body work, but about 8
yrs ago, had gotten a really big Miller and stored this one, and it
works as of the last time he used it. Did I want it?
Duh!!!!
Its marked Dan Mig 140/200. It has a full sized bottle of Gold 25?
(no idea if there is any in it..didnt check), gauges etc though not a
flow gauge.
We wrestled it into my trailer and there is sits until morning (it was
a 4 hour drive...yawn...).
This has some switches and knobs marked Stitch Welding and whatnot
along with the usual wire feed and power pots, post purge IRRC etc.
What the heck is Stitch Welding and how is it done? Does the machine
start and stop the weld? There is a time knob...IRRC.
What do I set the gas flow for? 15psi? It appears to be .035 wire.
Up to this point, Ive only used flux core on a 110vt wire feed. Any
hints or tips would be greatly appreciated. The shield on the end
of the torch is there, but for some reason it will now screw onto the
end of the torch. It falls off. Whats it missing? Ill try the sheild
from my 110 mig.
Any info would be greatly appreciated.
Gunner who had a good week for welders.
Confronting Liberals with the facts of reality is very much akin to
clubbing baby seals. It gets boring after a while, but because Liberals are
so stupid it is easy work." Steven M. Barry
Reply to
Gunner
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Yes! I have a Lincoln SP-150 with stitch. It's one of those things, once you have it, you can't live without it. :-) Good for thin material, with minimum distortion. You have to play around with it, till you get the hang of it. It's the same as pulling the trigger in short pulses, allows the weld to cool.
A friend bought a steam cleaner that some idiot had cut the tank in half to replace the coil. The tank is about the size of a 20 gal. air tank. It took about an hour to stitch it together, without the stitch, it may taken 4 hours, & my trigger finger would have fallen off. :-)
That sounds about right. Does the drive spool have 2 groves, .035 & .020 ? Mine is reversible. I also have an .045 drive spool, for flux core.
It may be the wrong nozzle. Nozzels are easy to make, if you can't buy one. If you can find a Tweco gun, put that on.
Reply to
Gary A. Gorgen
On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 09:52:16 GMT, Gunner calmly ranted:
So, how much do you want for the old thing, Gunner? Huh? Huh? Huh?
Indeed! Want to trade that Dan and the little Gorton Panto for my Lincoln-on-a-trailer and some gas money? ;)
========================================================== CAUTION: Do not use remaining fingers as pushsticks! ==========================================================
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
After using a 110 V box with fluxcore for years, I got a Miller 210. Welding with it is quite different than it was with the little box. I found it very useful to buy Miller's book on MIG welding and read it from cover to cover. I'm now making welds with the 210 that are both strong AND pretty. I recommend the book. It isn't any harder to do it right than it is to do it wrong, but there are a few things to know that I didn't know before reading the book. My welds were much better after I RTFM.
There is an orifice size calculator at
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With it, you can determine pressure (absolute, not gage) for a given flowrate (20 cu ft/hr is good for MIG) and orifice size, or orifice size for given absolute pressure. Add 15.7 PSI to gage pressure to get absolute pressure. Outlet pressure is about 15.7 PSI (atmosphere).
My Miller uses an .030" orifice.
You can also estimate flow rate by timing how long it takes to inflate a flattened 1-gallon baggie, or bubble the water out of a gallon milk jug. 20 cu ft/hr is about 24 seconds per gallon.
Happy MIGging!
Reply to
Don Foreman
Hummmm If you had a Lincoln IdealArch stick/tig or equivelent, we might talk. Gas powered lincoln I assume?
Id be more than happy to trade Stuff, for a decent stick tig machine ready to rock and roll.
I think Ill play with the Dan for a bit first though
Gunner
Confronting Liberals with the facts of reality is very much akin to clubbing baby seals. It gets boring after a while, but because Liberals are so stupid it is easy work." Steven M. Barry
Reply to
Gunner
I use a small flow meter on my sp-85 lincoln mig. Had my mig for 6 years now.
Easy to move it, when changing new homes.
my 2 cents
Reply to
xman Charlie
I cleaned up the welder, made sure it was indeed wired for 220 (its evidently possible to run it on 110 as well, and installed the gas bottle. Which was next to empty. Sigh... The gas sheild from my 110vt flux core machine fit perfectly
Despite this, I fired it up an burned some wire. Works very well even with the last gasp of C25 that was in the tank. I tried the stitch function. Thats way way cool!
Now when I refill the tank, how much does it usually cost and what gas or gas mix do I use for general purpose work on regular steel? How about stainless? Can this be used for thin aluminum? What gas?
The tank is one of those about 4' tall. B size? How long do they last?
There is a how to label on the inside of the wire side cover and it does mention being able to do aluminum with some changing stuff around. It also says to use ONly 25/75 mix for general use. Is this correct?
Whole new world for me to learn about.
Gunner
Confronting Liberals with the facts of reality is very much akin to clubbing baby seals. It gets boring after a while, but because Liberals are so stupid it is easy work." Steven M. Barry
Reply to
Gunner
On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 18:20:09 GMT, Gunner calmly ranted:
Yeah, it's a project I never got started on. I think the label said 375 but the only literature Lincoln had on it was for 300 and 400A models. It has a 4-cyl gasoline-powered Continental engine. The guy said it was running/working when he stopped using it. The trailer is a compact, heavy-duty thing sitting on 6-ply tires.
This is a bigass DC welder on wheels with about 75 lbs of cables, but no tig setup that I have seen.
Darn! ;)
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
About 10 hours.
C25 is pretty much the standard gas for carbon steel. Straight CO2 can also be used on steel, though spatter will be worse. A 2% O2 mix is often used on stainless steel to make the weld flow out better. There are more exotic mixes, tri-mixes, even quad-mixes, for special purposes, but for the majority of MIG welding, plain old C25 will do the job.
Gary
Reply to
Gary Coffman
C25 works well on steel, CO2 is cheaper. Use pure argon on aluminum. C25 will *not* work. The very little MIG welding I've done on stainless has been with pure argon. There are gas mixes optimized for stainless if you do enough stainless to invest in a cylinder just for that work.
How well your machine might work on thin aluminum depends on how thin, what size wire, feed rate and voltage range of the machine and how good you are at it. If you regard 1/16" as thin then you shouldn't have any problem. However, given your spare tire mount experience, you mignt not want a first project in aluminum to be an airplane....
A B cylinder should run about 4 hours or so. Cost to fill depends on what gas you fill it with and where you get it filled. It'll cost what it costs in your area. Suppliers are sometimes fussy about whose cylinders they'll fill so that could be an issue. May not be an issue with B size and smaller.
You are not limited to 25/75 for general use on steel. CO2 also works and is cheaper. 25/75 works better for me, YMMV.

Reply to
Don Foreman
This kind of reminds me of the thread a few years back about never getting tips on finding a lathe until you drive by with one on a trailer, at which point you get hundreds. I seem to recall that a tarped fiberglass decoy was discussed. Maybe a plywood box and some plastic irigation pipe would get you a welder...? :^) :^) :^)
--Glenn Lyford
Reply to
Glenn Lyford
Thanks!
Gunner
Confronting Liberals with the facts of reality is very much akin to clubbing baby seals. It gets boring after a while, but because Liberals are so stupid it is easy work." Steven M. Barry
Reply to
Gunner
LOL..indeed, I remember that.
Gunner
Confronting Liberals with the facts of reality is very much akin to clubbing baby seals. It gets boring after a while, but because Liberals are so stupid it is easy work." Steven M. Barry
Reply to
Gunner

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