Drilling itty bitty holes

I just messed up my only #71 drill bit -- boo hoo.
What's the name of the gizmo that you use when you have a Great Big Drill
Press, and you need to drill an itty bitty hole?
The one that transmits rotation to the drill, but lets you be the one
that exerts downward force on it.
Alternate suggestions for methods of drilling itty bitty holes will also
be gratefully accepted (Time to build my own plunge EDM machine?)
And, any suggestions of sources for drill bits, and types? McMaster has
a bunch. I need some to drill aluminum, some to drill really thin (15 or
30 mil) birch plywood.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
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They are called "Sensitive" drill chucks.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
McMaster has them, what you need is a sensitive drill chuck, or a CNC milling machine that would apply consistent feed.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus30421
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-- Unka George (George McDuffee) .............................. The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there. L. P. Hartley (1895-1972), British author. The Go-Between, Prologue (1953).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
Just go to Farnell / element 14 or RS components and grab a PCB drill the right size. Get ones with the 1/8 shank. I've use them routinely in my big old Waldown radial utility drill press and they work fine. The carbide ones are a bit fragile but ok if treated nicely.
Reply to
Dennis
Buy a Foredom flexshaft and drill press attachment, it's a lifetime investment and really useful for handwork and finishing. I drill thousands of holes with similar sized drills in 14 ga. sterling. I find a slow speed and beeswax as a lubricant works best. When the drills break it is usually because they are either dull or because the work moves.
Reply to
Mouse
Harbor Freight has an little air tool Item # 47869 that has the high rpm's for drilling small holes. Somewhere on the internet there is a web site showing how some kids made a drilling machine for PBC's that used one of these to drill. The machine drilled from the bottom up. A laser pointer mounted above showed where the hole would be.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
= Alternate suggestions for methods of drilling itty bitty holes -=-
when I was working with the guys at GE in Daytona, they drilled fiberglas PCB material at >120Krpm. Of course, they were drilling a 1/2" stack at 10 "hits" per second.... (all .015 to .032 holes at that speed; carbide, only)
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
The Harbor Freight tool only turns up to 56,000 rpm.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Dremel Rotary Tool Work Station. ;-)
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Cheers! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise
It may be a friend with an itty bitty drill press, as used for drilling circuit boards. Some big drill presses, particularly Asian imports, are so sloppy a sensitive chuck won't help keep from breaking drills.
Example:
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Reply to
Don Foreman
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Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
I use a an overrun small 12v DC motor fitted with a pin chuck and mounted in a housing which has an extension that slides freely in the tailstock chuck.
This gives me a high speed (15,000 RPM) tailstock drill. Since I manually feed the motor housing I can directly feel both drill torque and feed pressure.
A JPG is in the drop box under the heading "Tailstock Drill chuck"
Jim
Reply to
pentagrid
Patience? ;) I bought a set of handheld pin vises for my number drill set. I wonder how well those would chuck...
Do you think Amiron will get that for it? The first 240 viewers didn't think it was worth that...241 with me. You might for your dual unit, though, if you still have 'em.
I imagine that most folks' minds would wander toward little hobby drills rather than big industrial units. Small bit = small drill.
Frinstance:
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-- Nobody, as long as he moves about among the chaotic currents of life, is without trouble. -- Carl Jung
Reply to
Larry Jaques
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That's the one which I have -- but mine is old enough so it does not have the clear plastic belt guard -- and since I had it from new, it never did. :-)
Also -- the price when I got mine (near 1974 or so) was closer to $150.00. :-) The current price on the auction looks about $200.00 less than Cameron's own new price for the tool. It also came with a 0-1" dial indicator for showing the current depth of hole. Mine came with (and still has) an Albrecht 1/8" (3mm) keyless drill chuck, and it works well with down to #80 bits with no enlarged shank.
I've been very pleased with it over the years. I've even used it (with the dial indicator) and a small index head to make miniature barrel-keys for a multiple disk drive tray which needed each drive carrier locked in to power on each drive. Supposedly an early implementation of hot swap.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
(...)
I don't see anything between:
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What am I doing wrong, Jim?
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Nothing! The JPG and accompaning text file were posted to the drop box but have't appeared yet. Not sure of the reason for the delay so I've posted duplicate files to
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Reply to
pentagrid
Nifty!
--Winston
Reply to
Winston

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