Fabricating Camera Optical Equipment Lens Adapters

Thanks for the info Leon. As it happens, I already have a DJVU reader installed. I needed it to download and print the manual for a TEK 465B oscilloscope. But I'll still take a look at the one you like. Ain't the web aewsome? Eric
Reply to
etpm
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I wonder if this stuff would work?
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Btw, doesn't work at all as a bullet casting flux. Just set there on top of the melt. Didn't even smoke.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Thanks for your input Ned. The vacuum grease that I've worked with was a silicone type grease by Dow. I can't say that I know one way or the other if a silicone grease would be ideal for various scopes or binoculars. I don't recall having discovered silicone greases in any of the stuff I've taken apart.
I suppose a thick (medium thick) silicone grease would perform well, as long as it didn't get on lenses, prisms or mirrors (considering silicone's difficulty of removal from those surfaces).
Reply to
Wild_Bill
I think the greases that I've encountered in optical gear is what you referred to Stan.
The colors have ranged from a translucent amber to almost opaque brown.
The desirable effect that mentioned is important in most applications, sine loose movements would be problematic. Some damping of movement is very desirable.
There are some damping products avilable for moving mechanical parts on electronic gear, such as a slow-opening cassette door instead of one that flings open harshly. These typically range in viscosity from thick liquids to thick gels.
Several of these products state that they are synthetic and safe for use on all plastics.
A good general purpose light grease for small mechanisms is a GP Electronics product named Luberex It used to be white, but the in last tube I got, it's a translucent amber.
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Reply to
Wild_Bill
I'm always finding new things (programs, books...) to diddle with. A great waste of time, but it is pretty much the only thing I find of interest anymore and can afford to do...
The Open source DjVuLibre (which is what WinDjView uses part of) is pretty good too, but not quite as nimble. It has more supporting programs, suppose to be able to build djvu files with them. Haven't tried to do that but I might someday.
Reply to
Leon Fisk
Good point, I hadn't considered that the silicone would be difficult to remove if it gets on the glass. The Dow grease I have is very stiff. If I remember I'll see if it thins enough to be worrisome at any reasonable temperature.
The Permatex grease I mentioned does not contain silicone, but its consistency is closer to general purpose greases.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Thanks again Ned, I was looking at the Permatex products and saw one that might be the one you mentioned;
Permatex Ultra Slick Synthetic Multi-Purpose Lubricant with PTFE
It sounds like a good product to try out for any number of purposes.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
high-temp bearing grease usually has a bentone clay soap base, lithium is not too good for high temps, my ex-employer only used bentone.
Reply to
alan200
I think you mean bentonite. Lithium soaps are used specifically for high- temp performance. Bentonite I expect is added to greases for its rheological properties for leaky gearboxes. For optical assemblies, I don't think you want powdered clay in your grease.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
Correct bentonite I have been retired since '95 and have forgotten most of the technical terms. Only ever made one grade of grease, a special zinc based anti-wear OOO grade for mining machinery
Reply to
alan200

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