fuel consumption units

This is the rating for a 9hp honda engine. What does it mean?
230g/PS-hr(313g/kWh)
Reply to
mark
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It burns 313 grams of fuel per kilowatt hour?
Wes
Reply to
Wes
It means the engine consumes 230grams of a standard fuel per metric horsepower per hour of run time.
Thus if the engine runs flat-out producing 9 metric horse powers for 12 hours the fuel consumption would be: 230 x 9 x 12 =3D (fuel consumption in grams).
How applicable this is to your situation would require that you know the calorific value of the test fuel, and the octane number for the compression ratio for that engine. Probably a few other factors such as air pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, phases of the moon and the day of the week:-)).
It permits a comparison among engines from different manufacturers, especially if each mfg tests in accordance with the same standard.
Wolfgang
Reply to
wfhabicher
Rate of fuel consumption in grams of fuel per metric horsepower per hour. A PS is a unit commonly used in Europe and maybe elsewhere and is often known as a metric horsepower, 1 hp being 746 Watts, a PS being 735 Watts.
Reply to
David Billington
PS = Pferd Starken?
Pony Strength?
Piddly Steamboats?
Reply to
Tim Wescott
Any way to convert it to Gallons/hour. I am trying to compare the fuel consuption with my 210hp cummins diesel. This is on a commercial aquaculture boat and I use the honda for a hydraulic power pack but am considering letting the diesel idle all day long and run the hydraulic pump from it. The main reason is noise, I can't stand listeneing to the honda any more, the diesel is fairly quiet at idle.
Reply to
mark
Wes wrote in news:3GOFl.199207$rp7.139177@en-nntp- 02.dc1.easynews.com:
Yes, engine outputs are actually rated in KW, everywhere, right up until it gets to the marketing folks. Then it gets converted to HP.
Reply to
Anthony
mark,
454 grams =3D 1 lb. Weigh one gallon of your fuel (or look it up among a table of conversions) and bob's your uncle.
I was only half joking when I threw in air temperature in my earlier post because fuel temperature is definitely a factor in this conversion; ie. 1 gal of fuel oil @ 150 deg F weighs less than the same volume of fuel at say 60 deg F.
Your Honda engine would burn (1 / 454 x 230) =3D (230 / 454) lbs of fuel per PS per hour, or just a hair over 1/2 lb of fuel per PS per hour.
PS =3D Pferdestaerke, ie. horsepower, in German. It is very slightly smaller than a HP in the inch-lb-second system (US customary) of measure, as pointed out above.
Wolfgang
Reply to
wfhabicher
Fuel consumption and noise are the /least/ of your problems. It will cost you maybe $400 - $500 to replace or rebuild that 7 or 9 HP Honda engine every 5,000 hours. How much is a rebuild on the Cummins main engine ging to cost you? I'll guarantee you it's not $500, more like $5,000 plus. The Cummins will go longer between rebuilds, but you pay for it.
Are you running a genset for electric power? Or an inverter and a big battery bank? Make the hydraulics an electric pump - 120V if it's a constant load, 12V straight from the batteries for intermittent.
Is there any other auxiliary engine running when the main engine is off? Hang a hydraulic pump (with a magnetic clutch) off both the Cummins and the Auxiliary, a little piping and a toggle switch for the clutch coils, and you can pick the engine that's running.
If all else fails, hang a pump with a mag clutch off the Cummins for when it's running, and make a nice sound box for the Honda motor to kill the noise.
Or combine three or four different things on one engine - get one of the little water cooled 2 or 3-cylinder Diesels in the 18 - 30 HP range (Kubota, Deutz, Hatz, Kohler, etc.) and hide it down in the engine room where you don't have to listen to it.
Some "commercial" diesel gensets have the engine crankshaft available to hang a hydraulic pump off the end - they use a simple cage and Lovejoy Coupling. Check with your local telephone or power company for ideas, a lot of small 'bucket trucks' hang the pump for the bucket hydraulics on the Genset engine as a power source. You should be able to fine a marine style genset with the same crank access.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
I know this is a little off-topic, but how much of the workday is the the hydrauic "power pack" actually in use? If it's an intermittent thing, couldn't you use something like a pickup truck snowplow lift setup? Mine runs on a 12 volt battery. I know it sucks a lot of battery power, but you could get a big RV battery and either charge it from the Honda as needed, or from the main engine if once or twice a day would do it. My current snowplow unit is an integral device; the hydraulics are part of the lift frame. But I have an old unit where the whole pump/electric motor sits in the cab, with a lift hose going to the cylinder. That's the kind I think I'd consider. I think I see them in the Surplus Center catalogs.
Another thought, if the noise is the issue and you have to run the Honda all day: consider an 1800 rpm Onan (or similar) Genset. They are a lot quieter and they last a long time.
Pete Stanaitis --------------------------
mark wrote:
Reply to
spaco
I use the Cummins to get to the Mussel lease ~3 miles and then use Hydraulics for 10 hours straight and the use the Cummins to get back to the wharf. Currently the small hydraulic pack is up on the aluminum roof of the cabin of the boat, I have it mounted on rubber mounts but it seems the roof transmits the sound. Would a sheet of 2" styrofoam between the the 2 help this. Some guys run the hydraulics from the diesel but like someone said it is much cheaper to rebuild or buy a new honda. I think my simplest solution is to keep my current setup but move the power pack to the stern of the 31' boat and maybe build an insulated engine compartment making sure good air flow is maintained.
Reply to
mark
I use the Cummins to get to the Mussel lease ~3 miles and then use Hydraulics for 10 hours straight and the use the Cummins to get back to the wharf. Currently the small hydraulic pack is up on the aluminum roof of the cabin of the boat, I have it mounted on rubber mounts but it seems the roof transmits the sound. Would a sheet of 2" styrofoam between the the 2 help this. Some guys run the hydraulics from the diesel but like someone said it is much cheaper to rebuild or buy a new honda. I think my simplest solution is to keep my current setup but move the power pack to the stern of the 31' boat and maybe build an insulated engine compartment making sure good air flow is maintained.
You might look for a small diesel engine to run the hydraulics. Long time idling on a diesel can cause coking and other problems.
Reply to
Calif Bill
Have a look at nearly any motor yacht. they usually have a water cooled auxiliary generator that is mounted in either a sound proofed engine room or sound proof compartment and most of them are really quiet. Of course a water cooled engine is quieter then an air cooled engine but you'll get some ideas.
Regarding overhauls, if you want to stay with a small engine you might look into one of the Japanese or Chinese built horizontal, one cylinder, water cooled, diesels. I've seen them installed as generator sets on boats and they can be made to run pretty quietly and they last a long time.
Cheers,
Bruce (bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
Reply to
Bruce In Bangkok

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